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Sweet potato fries...help!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I tried making sweet potato fries at home the other day but they didn't come out crispy like they do from a restaurant. I tried blanching them first but that didn't work either. All the recipes that I looked at followed the same steps that I did, but still ended up with soggy fries...

Any suggestions????
post #2 of 17
trying parbaking them first and then flash them in the fryer when they are almost done.
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post #3 of 17
How did you actually 'fry' them? Most soggy, limp fries come from cooking too long or too little in fat that isn't hot enough. One of my favorite ways to do sweet taters is cut into about a 1/2 inch dice, then put a glass baking dish with a thin layer of high smoke point oil (canola, peanut, etc.) in the bottom into a 425 - 450 degree F oven for a bit. When the oli is hot add the potatoes, stir in a good dash of kosher salt, roast for bit, stir, roast, stir .... until golden brown and delicious. Another small dash of kosher salt sprinkled on them before the last stir, and black pepper after you pull them out of the oven is a nice touch. Some folks might like a healthy sprinkle of brown sugar on them instead of the salt while roasting, but I don't have much of a sweet tooth.

At various holidays when presented with mashed sweet potatoes with lots of brown sugar, marshmallows, maple syrup and such I smile, nod, endure a small portion and keep quiet in the interest of family peace.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 17
I'm gonna have to try your technique, team ... thanks for posting :lips:

Here's another thread on the subject: http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/food-...ato-fries.html

Like you. I don't care or things that are too sweet. A friend gave me her recipe for an alternative to too-sweet sweet potatoes. Perhaps you'll enjoy 'em ... here it is just as she sent it to me:

Meg’s Yams with Lavender Butter

6-8 medium size yams - the dark red type
1 tblspoon lavender buds (William's has them)
1 tblspoon sugar or xylitol
2-3 dash cinnamon
1 cup raw pecans
1 stick butter

1. Baked Yams
Wash and with a knife or fork prick holes in yams.
In a shallow covered baking dish, bake yams in 375 degree oven till soft to the touch - in my oven that's around 35-40 minutes.
Let cool and remove skins - keep warm.

2. Lavender infused butter
In small pan on low heat melt the butter - when melted turn off heat and stir in the lavender. Cover and set where it will stay liquid but no longer cooks.

3. Candied Pecans
Rough chop the pecans.
On a medium to low heat Dry Toast the pecans till crispy (Dry Toast is without oil) Remember to constantly stir the pecans or shake the pan so the pecans don't burn.
Turn off the heat and add sugar and cinnamon - stir well and set to the side.

4. Use a fine meshed sieve to strain the lavender infused butter into a bowl.

5. Add, per your taste, the butter to the yams and mash very smooth.

6. Gently fold in the pecans.

7. You are done!!

May be made the night before and warmed in the microwave.
Left over butter can be refrigerated and used on toast or ...

Have fun!
post #5 of 17
IMHPO Sweet potato fries will rarely come out crisp. Having tried to serve them in my fair share of kitchens they have always been problematic. It doesn't matter if you blanch, soak, par-boil/bake/fry, use frozen or try to hold them in desert like conditions.... they will not stay crisp. Even serving them immediately from fryer to plate they loose their texture. I believe it might have something to do with their sugar/moisture content and general overall properties when compared to a cured Russet.

Looking back 15-20 years ago, they were a neat gimmick and seemed a good substitute to regular fries. There were several places in the Atlanta market that would offer either regular or sweet potato fries. I always cringed whenever the owners of places wanted to add these to the menu. I'm not saying you should give up trying but it became a futile effort to us and so often we just gave up trying to perfect them.

They do make decent chips when handled properly though and I have had more success trying to produce those over the years. Still the best way to enjoy sweet potatoes is baked topped with butter, cinnamon and sugar, in a casserole or pie.
post #6 of 17

ole!

i make baked sweet potato fries(wedges) that i first marinate in tequila,lime juice, kosher salt, pepper, olive oil and cilantro for an hour, then bake in 375 oven for 40 45 minutes, turning once...they come out somewhat crispy with still some potato in the middle.. serve with a chipotle ketchup...thats all i got..maybe it has something to do with the size fry you are cutting
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone who helped me out! Will definately be trying some of these new methods in the future! :)
post #8 of 17
One more suggestion for you if you want to do something that looks akin to normal potato fries.

Blanch the fries and drain well, then dust lightly with a little corn starch before frying in hot oil - the additional starch encourages them to crisp up and stay that way.
post #9 of 17
Slice shoestring size. drop into 270f degree oil for 20 sec. let cool for about 2 min. then drop again for about 20 sec. Cool compleatly. Bag 'em up in a zippy, toss 'em in the frig. They're good for 2-3 days. When ready to cook toss 'em intgo 350f oil for 1.5 -2 min ... they'rre done.:smoking:
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #10 of 17
Joey, that sounds **** good!!!
my crew loves sweet taters in almost any savory way. Usually just bake them, some use butter, some olive oil and salt and pepper.

I think I have tried every size and method to get crispy fries and not sure it is possible? one gal last summer said where she lives (in Mississippi), there is a tiny place that makes them crisp and perfect and she would get recipe for me---e-mailed, they get them frozen??

Not savory, but did find a great sweet potato pound cake last year, can post or pm if anyone is interested?
Nan

edit: in all fairness Dirk, I have not tried in them in the classic method, will give it a shot, thanks!
post #11 of 17
I'm with the person who suggested cornstarch... maybe try to do a sweet and salty batter, to try and texture it like a beer batter fry? I'm going to go all mad-scientist in the kitchen tonight and see if I can figure something out...
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For the best cakes in Spokane (and all the "weird" designs that other bakers won't do) visit www.cakes-by-sarah.com !
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post #12 of 17
I would just say make sure your oil is hot enough
post #13 of 17
i also have problems preparing fries for snacks...:o
post #14 of 17
You speak the truth my friend, it's all about the double fry.....I cut mine kind of rough like carrot sticks, season them, fry them at 350 for a minute or so, take them out and let drain on paper towels, turn the heat to 375 and drop them back in a batch at a time, careful not to overcrowd the pot, and crisp them up usually less than a minute, this gives them a super crusty outside and a nice soft inside, they are always a crowd pleaser when I do them. It literally took me a year to figure out this was the way to do it.
post #15 of 17

sweet potato problem

You need to keep the fries frozen, cook them in hot oil (350 degrees F) and cook them for about 2-3 minutes...they should be what you are looking for.
post #16 of 17
The only consistently crispy SP fry I've seen is a coated fry.
Everything else loses it's crispness quickly.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #17 of 17

mpbcobb, I have to agree with you on your suggestion.   I have tried time and again, and tried different ideas that I could find.  Finally got a truly crisp sweet potato chip and here's how I did it:

1) Slice as thinly as possible on a mandoline.  I like the crinkle cut blade, set at 0.  Really, really thin.

2)  Immerse the slices in salted water as you cut the potato.  After all is sliced, rinse and soak again in large bowl, heavily salted.   Soak in refrig. at least 3 hrs.

3) Drain the chips in a salad spinner, and lay on a cookie sheet.  FREEZE overnight.

4) Flash fry the frozen chips in small batches.  I used canola oil and it worked fine.  If the chips are super thin, then will brown quickly, in 2 or 3 minutes, so keep an eye on them.  You want them golden, but not brown.

They will be slightly salty from the soak.  I just add some brown sugar and chili powder for extra flavor.  I have been frying, baking, broiling these things and definitely the soaking in salt water, freezing, and then frying while still frozen does the trick!

Here's the result.  cheers.

DSC01450.JPG

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