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Sweet Corn, Should I Buy Now?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I will be having a big BBQ at my house on 7/5. We'll be serving 60+-adults and 30+- kids. We'll be smoking shoulders, ribs, brisket, and chicken, a couple hundred pounds worth. It's going to be like the feast in "Beowulf", sans the buzz killing visit by Grendel.

Along with the mountains of smokey goodness, I would like to serve some roasted corn. It's pre-corn time here in Cheeseland, ( and we'll be lucky to get much at all this year because of the rains) and I will be forced to utilize southern grown ears. Yesterday, some pretty scrawny ears at the local Scratch and Save were 4 for $2.00. At that price I'd have as much in corn as I would in pork shoulders. That won't be happening.

I was talking to a friend yesterday, and apparently a specific Scratch and Save is undergoing a rebirth, and they were having a truckload sale on sweet corn, 24 ears for two or three bucks. My lovely bride has headed in that direction to investigate.

Do you think husk on ears of corn would last until July 5th? I'm thinking moldy, rotting, roasted corn might take the shine off the meats.

Kevin
post #2 of 10
No, it won't last and taste good. Corn must be fresh, and it quickly loses it's sweetness. IMO, if you can't get really fresh corn, make something else.

scb
post #3 of 10
Kev,

It may not be the most perfect solution but........

Years ago when we would go to the corn festival in Walworth Wisc we would buy a couple bushels. Then we would take it home, roast, boil or steam it and then freeze it. If you have a food saver then put it in bags to save it. Then all we did was take it out of the freezer the day before and reheat in the same method it was cooked.

If you put the correct amount of butter and salt (as they did at the fest....) it tastes just great.

as mentioned fresh is always best but sometimes outside influences make room for adjustments. Better than nuttin at all. :D
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
It turns out the corn is 10 for two dollars, so the great deal was somewhat exaggerated. We tried a few ears yesterday and it's so inferior to what we get here late summer that it was pretty disappointing.

I'm going on vacation Thursday and am going to wait until I get back 7/2 to see what's around. Maybe some trucks will come in before the Fourth. Roasting corn is so easy, it would have been nice. Pull silk. Soak. Throw on grill. Have some party monkey with a beer in hand turn it every few minutes until done. Oh, well.

Walworth, WI. Where haven't you lived, Oldschool? :D

Kevin
post #5 of 10
:lol:I would say west of the Mississippi but then KC is there so let's just say west of the Missouri (until it turns east in KCMO) and have visited 9 states west of there.:D

BTW it's a shame your corn crop is suffering so. Wish I could get you some from the area here. It's been very good so far.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
KC. Let's hope our brisket turns out half as good as Arthur Bryant's. It's the smoked meat we are least proficient producing. In the mid 80's, after reading Calvin Trillin's book, me and a buddy once drove all night after the bars closed here in Milwaukee just to eat at AB's. It was tiring and most likely dangerous, but well worth the trouble.

I haven't seen him in almost six years, and he's the reason we're throwing the BBQ. Smoked meats and adult beverages are in serious jeopardy on 7/5. :lol:

But first I head to DC Thursday for five days for some eating and sight seeing with the family. Peruvian chicken, The Colorado Kitchen, and Old Ebbet's(?) raw bar are on the wife's list at this point. We're also seeing a number of Texas song writers performing on the mall on 6/27.

Kevin
post #7 of 10
The fresh corn at the farmstands in August and September is the only thing that makes living in the frigid Upper Midwest bearable.

Well, the tomatoes at that time, too. I've been told by a butcher that the demand for pork bellies skyrockets at that time, as everybody treats themselves to BLT's with the fresh tomatoes.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #8 of 10
Kev,

Since you're heading to DC....... I know the crop around here (Central and Southern Virginia) is starting to come in and we just sampled a couple ears the other night. They were a little smaller than the later in the year crop but that didn't affect their flavor. You can pick some up at around 12 for 2 bucks and overnight them back to the house when you leave or just pack them well and check as baggage. Wouldn't that be about the time you'll be needing them anyways?
post #9 of 10
The fresh corn at the farmstands in August and September is the only thing that makes living in the frigid Upper Midwest bearable.

Well, the tomatoes at that time, too. I've been told by a butcher that the demand for pork bellies skyrockets at that time, as everybody treats themselves to BLT's with the fresh tomatoes.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #10 of 10
I live in Jersey where theres 200 ears of corn per person.....:talk:

Here they say to eat corn 2 to 3 days at the most after buying it and even then its been sitting for a few days after its been picked. I know I can drive 2 seconds down the road from me sneak onto the local farmers feilds and pick my own.....SHHHHH I didnt just say that. It really depends how long its traveled since its been picked.

Another thing that is amazing is buying that scrawny corn and sticking some nice herb and lemon butter under the husk and grill the crap out of it THAN remove the corn from the cob and use that as a smoking wood.

But if you dont want to do that, deff buy it a day or 2 at the most before you plan on eating or cooking it.
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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