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An Open Letter to Gordon Ramsay - Page 3

post #61 of 72

Gordon Ramsay haters- C'MON  he has never kicked anyone's ass that never deserved it. He was and presently is one of the best Chefs in the world. He is humble enough to learn from any source he can.  Yeah hes not a softy all the time but some people are just morons! Im a retired LAPD officer who pretty much talked my way into the kitchen a few years ago. I dont care how they talk to me I just want to learn. Im a female over 50 and not thin skinned. But thats just me. I dont have an ego ..and thats the only way you will progress by watching and asking questions...I learned that from GR,,ok im done venting

post #62 of 72

Lol, who are you venting to, this thread is 8 years old. 

 

Gordon is a great chef though. 

post #63 of 72

lol   I didnt check the date ..I do feel better though haha

post #64 of 72

I couldn't read the letter because the link wasn't working; but I could read the discussion thread.

 

Most of the responders are so touchy-feely it warms my heart.   Not. 

 

I don't know how old everyone in this discussion is, but I suspect most are young.   Young people nowadays expect to be coddled and protected from all sorts of discomfort.  And they have been encouraged and supported in that regard by overprotective parenting and government. 

 

When I came up in the restaurant business, chefs were tough and demanded things to be done their way.

 

Gordon Ramsey in Hell's Kitchen is over the top of course, but that's show business.     I watched very little TV, but I considered Hell's Kitchen one of the best shows.     I think that's because I worked in kitchens,  and it's also a function of my personality.    I can understand civilians not getting it. 

post #65 of 72
I just wish he was more consistent. I've heard and seen him crucify people over the use of truffle oil. Then on HK he tells one of the cooks to put more truffle oil on the fries. And in Kitchen Knightmares he crucified folks for not serving real chips with fish & chips... But at GR Pub in Laa Vegas he serves fries with his own fish & chips. And not to mention the bland mash on the shepards pie. GR Steak and BurGR are much more true to his standards. He's a great chef and a great businessman who has a great reputation and empire but...
post #66 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

I just wish he was more consistent. I've heard and seen him crucify people over the use of truffle oil. Then on HK he tells one of the cooks to put more truffle oil on the fries. And in Kitchen Knightmares he crucified folks for not serving real chips with fish & chips... But at GR Pub in Laa Vegas he serves fries with his own fish & chips. And not to mention the bland mash on the shepards pie. GR Steak and BurGR are much more true to his standards. He's a great chef and a great businessman who has a great reputation and empire but...

Consistency is a real wrench for chefs isn't it? I feel sorry for chefs who change their mind on something because then they are automatically labeled inconsistent. I once saw an episode of Jamie Oliver's "Jamie at Home" which was a show about seasonal cooking and he was making a mushroom dish. He advised to avoid white button mushrooms because they lack flavor of other mushrooms. But then on an episode of 15min meals he used white button mushrooms. One show was geared towards food snobs and the other geared at people who don't cook. Who knows what his real stance on white button mushrooms are.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #67 of 72
Yup. The issue is exaggerated when an extreme position or outrageous reaction accompanies an opinion. Truffle oil and white button mushrooms have a time and place. So do real truffles and chanterelles. If only that was how the opinion was phrased, but that wouldn't make an interesting tv show I suppose.
post #68 of 72

Whoa talk about a blast from the past!

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #69 of 72
still relevant after all these years. (A phrase I'm trying to sell to Paul Simon for use as a song title)
post #70 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomNYC View Post

 

I don't know how old everyone in this discussion is, but I suspect most are young.   Young people nowadays expect to be coddled and protected from all sorts of discomfort.  And they have been encouraged and supported in that regard by overprotective parenting and government. 

Not sure why you had to include this in your comment. 

 

I've worked in places where everybody looks like they have a dark cloud hanging over their head. Nobody smiles, there is no real interaction. Every body is confrontational, arrogant, self important, and passive aggressive. It instigates fear. This came from the boss, who was like G Ramsay is on his stupid reality shows. It sells, but it also excuses and enables other bullies from engaging in similar behavior. People who have no right to chop everyone around them at the knees so they can appear taller. 

 

But the fact that commercial kitchens (or any other workplace) should allow abuse simply because its the way they did it in the old days and people are wimps, just propagates bullying and a bad working environment. The result is poor performance and instigates bad attitudes in most cases. Others seem to think berating and humiliating someone in front of their peers for a simple mistake is supposed to be motivational. People who defend this behavior are usually bullies themselves, and don't have any other way to elevate themselves over everyone else. It makes them feel stronger and more important. They find it amusing. In G Ramsay's case, at least he has the chops. They say Miles Davis was an a hole, and Mingus was known to punch people for being late to rehearsal. Sure, they are giants in jazz, but it doesn't excuse abusive behavior. I don't disagree that parents can be overprotective, but the other extreme isn't any good either. I'd keep the government thing out of it, though. 


Edited by jake t buds - 5/12/16 at 8:33am
post #71 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 

Not sure why you had to include this in your comment. 

 

I've worked in places where everybody looks like they have a dark cloud hanging over their head. Nobody smiles, there is no real interaction. Every body is confrontational, arrogant, self important, and passive aggressive. It instigates fear. This came from the boss, who was like G Ramsay is on his stupid reality shows. It sells, but it also excuses and enables other bullies from engaging in similar behavior. People who have no right to chop everyone around them at the knees so they can appear taller. 

 

But the fact that commercial kitchens (or any other workplace) should allow abuse simply because its the way they did it in the old days and people are wimps, just propagates bullying and a bad working environment. The result is poor performance and instigates bad attitudes in most cases. Others seem to think berating and humiliating someone in front of their peers for a simple mistake is supposed to be motivational. People who defend this behavior are usually bullies themselves, and don't have any other way to elevate themselves over everyone else. It makes them feel stronger and more important. They find it amusing. In G Ramsay's case, at least he has the chops. They say Miles Davis was an a hole, and Mingus was known to punch people for being late to rehearsal. Sure, they are giants in jazz, but it doesn't excuse abusive behavior. I don't disagree that parents can be overprotective, but the other extreme isn't any good either. I'd keep the government thing out of it, though. 

 

I agree completely. In this day and age, there is no excuse for bullying or harassing behavior, in any environment, period. I truly feel like that kind of behavior is one of the things that is holding this industry (as a whole) back. I've worked for chefs like that in the past--I really try my hardest to not model myself on that example. I don't want my cooks coming to work with pits in their stomach, nervous and afraid. I'd rather they were positive, motivated and willing to give effort. There is a difference between having expectations, standards and commitment and being a bully who abuses people to get what they want. 

 

This whole notion of "how it was done back then" doesn't hold water for me either. Just because people didn't say anything "back in the day" doesn't mean that people's feeling weren't hurt, or their psyche wasn't damaged. It means they were trained to suck it down and not say anything about it, for risk of further abuse. In honesty, it is similar to child or spousal abuse in that way (don't poke the bear), and also (like spousal and child abuse) perpetuates the cycle. In my opinion, it takes even more COURAGE and fortitude to stand up to this kind of bullying and stop it in it's tracks than it does to just suck it up and go on with it. So, in a way, the "young" people are MORE courageous than the "older" people, because they have the stones to stand up to bullies and try and stop it. So there. 

 

One comfort I take is that I really think this kind of behavior is (slowly) being phased out. Not saying it doesn't exist, not saying it won't exist in the future, but as an aggregate I think the industry is trending towards more positive, professional atmospheres. 

post #72 of 72
I tried to read your article but I can not have access to it, it seems to have disappeared. Would you kindly send it to me via private message. I completely agree with you and feel the same way. Thank you for your post.

Best regards
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