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Eggs and Sugar

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone
I've been trying to bake brownies these days and i havent been successful so far..

I have a few questions to clarify.

1st - What do eggs do to the brownie ?

2nd - Can milk chocolate or any eating chocolate ( Calbury etc ) be substituted with baking chocolate ?

3rd - If using milk/eating chocolate is fine, do i still have to add in additional sugar to the batter ? *What i have in mind now is, milk chocolate for example, already has a high sugar content, so, would adding additional sugar be complusory ?*

4th - What does sugar do to the brownie ? Does sugar thicken it or hold the brownie together ?



Thank you all in advance of any replies
Have a nice day !:)
post #2 of 16
You shouldn;t use milk chocolate in brownies, they won;t come out. The chocolate flavor isn't strong enough, and the amount of sugar is not easily determined.

The eggs hold it together, and help with the rising.

the sugar keeps em moist
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi Siduri, how are you ?

Thanks for putting a comment.

Ah, so..milk chocolate doesnt work for a brownie.
May i know why ?
Is it because milk chocolate doesnt have enough percentage of cocoa powder or does milk have any effect on the batter ?

Do people add milk to brownie ? I think i've came across a few recipes that include milk in it, am i right to say that ?
post #4 of 16

what is happening???

CWL
What is happening to make you feel like things are not going in a positive nature??
Determination is going after Moby Dick in a row boat and bringing the tarter sauce!!!!......NICE!
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Determination is going after Moby Dick in a row boat and bringing the tarter sauce!!!!......NICE!
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post #5 of 16
Hi CWL - i'm fine, thanks, and you?
Milk changes the texture of things and would probably make the brownies cakey rather than chewy, and would diminish their chocolate flavor. Milk seems to inhibit the development of chocolate flavor.
Milk chocolate has too little cocoa in it and would make for a bland brownie, plus the amount of sugar is variable and hard to account for in the recipe.
I've found recipes using bittersweet baking chocolate, since unsweetened chocolate was nonexistent here, and also one using cocoa and they both came out ok, because the recipe was made for them. There is a proportion to use for cocoa replacing chocolate which i can find if you need it. You have to add butter. But butter has a different melting point and the result is never identical. For bittersweet chocolate there is a problem with the amount of sugar to replace, but that could probably be worked out.
I've eaten plenty of "brownies" that are nothing like brownies, and i suspect they had milk in them and possibly used a different method than the melt chocolate and butter, add sugar, add eggs, add flour, salt and baking powder method. That method produces what are actually brownies, chewy, black, chocolatey things with a little paper thin crust on top that flakes when you cut them.
I'm no expert but have lots of home cooking experience, and i also read LOTS of cookbooks so i've gathered this information here and there
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi littlechef0222 !

Oh, i tried using milk chocolate instead of baking chocolate and i didnt add sugar into my brownie batter as i thought the sugar present in the milk chocolate would be sufficient..now that i've read what siduri said about how sugar makes a brownie moist, i'm going to incorporate them into my next attempt.

I tried my own method and it didnt turn out right, well, i'm going to give it another shot

Thank you for the replies you guys have given me, those were great information ! 8-)




Hi Siduri !
I'm great as well =) thanks for asking

A BIG thank you for the revelent information you have given me.
It seems that no one uses milk chocolate to make a brownie ?
I'll try to play with other variety of chocolates and let you know how they come out, i am still wondering if someone could make a brownie using milk chocolate...hmmm....anyway, have a great day ahead !

hope to hearing from you soon =)
post #7 of 16
I have used milk chocolate in making brownies before but not just milk--always in conjunction with dark chocolate.

You need sugar in your brownie otherwise it won't taste sweet. Don't forget you are adding a pile of other ingredients in addition to that chocolate--the chocolate might be sweet enough to eat on its own but as soon as you add all that other stuff in and don't adjust the sugar amounts it is going to taste like a brown omelette. Are you looking to make a lower fat/calorie version?

In addition to providing moistness sugar will also soften the gluten in your flour giving your brownie a nice texture. The caramelization of it during the baking process also contributes to the final esthetic of your brownie.

I use equal parts dark chocolate and equal parts sugar in my brownie. And my brownie is not tremendously sweet. Rich and decadent but not overly sweet.

Here's a baker's secret for you--add a splash of raspberry coulis/flavouring to your brownie batter--it will really enhance the chocolate and give a beautiful colour to your finished product.

I only use chocolate formulated specifically for baking, enrobing, etc. Check with your local bakery--I'm sure they'd be willing to sell you some. If you lived close enough to me--I'd sell you some of mine--you wouldn't need a whole lot for a pan of brownies. The better the quality of the chocolate the better your finished product. Chocolate is the star of any brownie--you really want it to shine.

Might I ask why you are sold on milk chocolate for your brownie? I am going to admit to a mortal sin for any baker--I am NOT a fan of dark chocolate. Not for eating on its own anyway--I am a milk girl all the way. But in baking--I ALWAYS use dark. I do have a 20 kg bag of milk chocolate callets in the restaurant but I don't go through them anywhere near as quickly as the dark. Well.....I WOULDN'T go through them anywhere near as quickly if the staff would quit eating them!!!!!!!

Happy Baking!
post #8 of 16
A lot to chew on in this thread.

1. What do eggs do to the brownie? Eggs perform several tasks. They provide both leavening and richness. Although these attributes seem contradictory, consider: Without eggs, you'd have a lean, sweet chocolate cracker.

2. Can milk chocolate be used? Yes, absolutely. In fact, you can make the same cookie/cake without chocolate at all and call it a blondie. The real question is, "How will milk chocolate brownies be different?" They won't taste nearly as chocolaty and there will be texture issues. I suggest getting a few bags each of white chocolate chips, milk chocolate chips and dark chocolate chips and adding them in various proportions to a basic brownie recipe until you have exactly the chocolate notes you want. FWIW, Mrs. BDL, who's the Chief Executive In Charge of Brownie Makin in this corporation, usually makes brownies with ground cocoa rather than chocolate. Good? Well, yes.

3. How would using milk chocolate instead of baker's chocolate change the brownie? You'll need to do a lot of adjustment in terms of sugar and other flavorings to get a decent product. In other words, you can't just substitute milk chocolate for baker's straight across and expect similar results. That isn't to say you couldn't turn out good brownies -- but they'd be different. To bake them you'll have to find a milk chocolate brownie recipe or develop your own. If you google "milk chocolate brownies" you'll get pages of results.

4. What does sugar do? I hate to argue with Siduri and almost never do on account of her being right. However, sugar doesn't do much beyond making the brownies sweet. Sugar does not significantly effect the moisture content or your perception of moistness.

5. Siduri's second post in which she basically says there are a zillion ways to skin the brownie cat and you ought to try a bunch of them is very good advice. The best way to answer your questions is to fool around and see what new questions you come up with. It seems that's the track you're already taking.

Welcome to the madhouse,
BDL
post #9 of 16
There are some brownie recipes that have the sugar creamed with the butter. There, the sugar serves to areate the brownie, giving it a cakier texture, rather than a fudgie one. (I don't care for this sort. If I want to eat cake, I'll eat cake. If I want a brownie, I want a brownie. In fact, I think I need to go make some.)
post #10 of 16
That's an excellent point. Creaming sugar into butter causes the mixture to form little bubbles, which provide expandable cells for heating air or gas released by other leavening agents -- baking powder for instance. I don't know what or even if I was thinking.

Good catch,
BDL
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi chefelle !
How are you doing ?

Thank you for the information !
I guess you're right on the sweetness of the milk chocolate itself, it is sweet enough to be eaten on its own but when added to the brownie batter, i might require sugar to enhance the sweetness.

Oh, you asked why did i want to use milk chocolate for my brownie ?
It is kind of a funny incident, i was preparing to bake a brownie one day.
So, i went to the nearby Supermart to get some baking choclates..unfortunately, they were not available.
I had to make them that day, so i thought, maybe i can try to make them with milk chocolate, grabbed a few bars of them and off with the experiment =)




When i faced problems after 2 attempts, i decided to post up a thread here to get some help.
I didnt expect to have so many replies back =)

Thank you people for the posts and please keep them coming !
I've gained more / better knowledge now thanks to you guys :lol:




Hey BDL !

Thank you very much for answering all those questions i've posted as well !

I'll still try to make brownies using milk chocolate, i suppose i might have to play around with the ratio of milk chocolate, sugar etc..

I'll post up a pic if i ever succeed !

HAPPY BAKING EVERYONE !
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Oops, sorry i left out a question ! :suprise:


For the eggs in the brownie mixture, How long do u beat them for ? And how about the consistency of the beaten egg ? I've seen some people beat them until they turned to a light yellow creamy moose-like substance before they add the sugar and my aunt told me she beat them like how you would prepare a scramble egg with a fork.

Can anyone please tell me how do you actually beat your eggs for brownie, or, different recipes call for different texture of beaten eggs ? :confused:
post #13 of 16
The way you beat the eggs is one variable for controlling texture. The more you beat the eggs, the lighter, more cake and less cookie-like your brownies will be. This is because highly beaten eggs hold more air. Your aunt's method is certainly a good one, and calculated to produce a denser brownie.

As eggs are whisked the proteins begin to toughen enough to create a bubble structure. Whole eggs which are beaten thick are said to be beaten to "the ribbon stage." That means that when you lift your whisk from the bowl it will take some egg with it, which will then fall off in a wide ribbon rather than a thin stream. The egg is light, airy and indeed something like a mousse (but nothing like a moose). Whole eggs beaten beyond the ribbon stage are not as good for baking. The proteins get too tough and the bubble structure breaks down.

BDL
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you BDL !

You seem to have a lot of knowledge in baking 8-)

Here, let me show you a video of brownie making.

" Ah, i am not allowed to post URLs to other sites after i have made 5 posts of more.. "

Anyway, if its convenient for you to go to youtube, type in super fudge brownie, the video shows you how dyanne bakes ^^,

That was how she beat the eggs, didnt that way of beating eggs trapped too much air in it ?
post #15 of 16
bdl, i thank you for your comment, but i'm not nearly as right as you are, though i do admit to having very strong OPINIONS about being right.
Anyway, i thought that the sugar affected, if not the moistness of the brownies, at least the EXPERIENCE of moistness. (People add sugar syrup to dry cakes to make them moist, no? doesn;t sugar do something - i don;t know - like "trap" the moisture, or make it gooey or something that a layman may consider "moistness"? Am i confusing "chewiness" with "moistness"?

The reason i ventured to suggest that sugar makes them moist is that i read once that cakes that use less butter need more sugar for the moistness (or semblance of moistness). Now maybe i got it wrong, or got it from a source that was wrong. As for chemistry, i'm almost always wrong. But i would be curious about that.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #16 of 16
bdl, i thank you for your comment, but i'm not nearly as right as you are, as you well know, having the background and culinary education, though i do admit to having very strong OPINIONS about being right.

Anyway, i thought that the sugar affected, if not the moistness of the brownies, at least the EXPERIENCE of moistness. (People add sugar syrup to dry cakes to make them moist, no? doesn;t sugar do something - i don;t know - like "trap" the moisture, or make it gooey or something that a layman may consider "moistness"? Am i confusing "chewiness" with "moistness"?

The reason i ventured to suggest that sugar makes them moist is that i read once that cakes that use less butter need more sugar for the moistness (or semblance of moistness). Now maybe i got it wrong, or got it from a source that was wrong. As for chemistry, i'm almost always wrong. But i would be curious about that.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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