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What is authentic mexican ground beef seasoned with? - Page 2

post #31 of 59

Look into Mexican Cookbooks by Dianne Kennedy. She describes numerous types of chiles as well as wonderful photos and illustrations of what she's describing. As far as authentic, these are important. The combinations are endless and every single one is delicious in its own right. You just have to find the taste you like best.

 

My favorite regional cuisine is So. Mexico, Yucatan,and Guatemalan. More bordering on the mole variations, tons of flavor and not as much heat. Fire roasted chiles and ingredients, pepitas and sesame seed are a major role, masa flour in the sauces.

 

Also there's a huge variation in "mexican" restaurants. You have the commercial chains or the hole in the wall (much preferred) family places that have the more authentic flavors. Not as pretty but OH so much better. When all else fails, ask.

 

Our Guatemalan family was more than happy to explain about the Guajillo, cascabel, ancho and whatnot that went into the traditional Christmas paches tamales. Este y este y este...lovely.

 

Hope this helps.

 

April

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post #32 of 59

First what i call ground meat is only meat passed trough a grinder, no spices, no salt, nothing but meat. You choose which meat you like and then you ask to be grinded. Then with this meat you can cook many mexican dishes or mexican varieties of foreign dishes, like chorizo: for chorizo in Mexico we add chilaca chili, onion, dried tomato, oregano, cumin, pepper, garlic, salt, vinegar, clove, almonds and pine nuts. If you want picadillo, you add onion, garlic, chopped tomato, salt, oregano, potato, carrot, peas and a little bit of lime juice or vinegar. If you want to make mexican bolognese sauce, follow the bolognese sauce instructions but add chilpotle chili to the mix, the result is amazing. If you want meat to fill chilis and make chiles rellenos, then mix the ground meat with garlic, onion, cinnamon, clove, salt, peppes, raisins, parsley, english walnut and peaches in syrup. If it is commoni would say it was picadillo.

post #33 of 59

I have to say that if you are attempting to eat an authentic taco,,its not made from ground beef,,,,but shredded  beef  carne asada , lengua,carrbaso    pork or  chicken usually shredded or even chorrizo ,,,please excuse my attempted mexican spelling,,  when you go to a ( authentic mexican restaurant  )  and order a taco it quite often comes on a hard shell, ( because they assume thats how a gringo wants it ),,however when you order an authentic mexican taco it comes on a hot sometimes doubled soft corn tortilla,,,,sorry I never answered your question but I wanted to address authentic first !!!

 the best food comes from somewhere deep within a latin neighborhood,,a little corner tienda  ,, I have had as many as 250 spanish employees at a time,,,,and they have changed the way i enjoy mexican food !!!

post #34 of 59

What is authentic mexican ground beef seasoned with?

 

 

 

 

 

Simple ..................... authentic Mexican seasonings. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #35 of 59

Don't you love the forums?  What did we learn here? 

 

Hey world ... what are some good Mexican ground beef recipes?   Different regions have different recipes.   A famous chef I know always makes his differently.   He has a restaurant in land XYZ.   My mother is from XYZ.   She doesn't speak Spanish there but a derivative of it.  I speak German.  Well my aunt speaks French, isn't that amazing?

 

Where is my friggin' taco meat recipe?  Guests are coming in a few hours and mine tastes like Taco Bell (has NO taste in other words).

post #36 of 59

I use cumin ,s and p, paprika, hot pepper of some kind, thyme, oregano, or california spices, cilantro, some smoked paprika. Everyone has their own way to do it. I use for taco or any other mexican dish. I chop meat coursley not fine.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #37 of 59

The irony!!!!  I just so happened to ask a Mexican Waiter (?) the other night, how they cooked their ground beef and what they put in it spice wise...

He told me basically peppers, tomatoes, onion, salt.....I do not recall him saying cumin or garlic specifically.  That doesn't mean they are not in there.  He also told me that the ground beef and spice (list above and whatever else) is not cooked on the stove.  It is put in a crock-pot and cooked for time unknown.   

A few hours at least.  The ground beef does basically fall apart-so to say.

 

 

When making chili, I personally like to brown my ground beef in a skillet and thoroughly rinse it and then put in crock-pot with other ingredients and let it cook on low for a few hours.  Excellent!

post #38 of 59

Nothing says "Mexican" like a crock pot.

 

BDL

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post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgemmerling View Post

I personally like to brown my ground beef in a skillet and thoroughly rinse it

Why rinse it?

post #40 of 59

After browning the meat in a skillet it is sometimes rinsed to remove any excess fat, the same thing can be done by leaving it in a fine mesh conical strainer for about 20 minutes or so.

 

 

Not exactly the best idea, but it is done with the intention of reducing fat content.

 

I like a few others believe it's not the fat content of food so much as total number of calories of the consumed food that is the issue, but that is harder to explain i guess, so long live the 'low' fat fad.

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #41 of 59

For that ultra-tender beef that you sometimes find.

 

Start the finely ground beef in ample water, add about 1/4 tsp baking soda per pound of beef, stir, simmer and stir lots more until well cooked and almost all of the water has been driven off.

 

Don't let it brown at all during this time - browning will cause lumps to form.

 

Once the beef is very fine, leave the fat in but use a binder (Masa, oat meal or rice flour any low gluten flour) to soak it up, then add your spices and brown it a bit. 

 

This will start you well onto the way to a 'taco-bell' type of juicy, meaty mush that so many people love!

(they simply add more things at the end to get their 'brand' of flavour profile)


Edited by MichaelGA - 11/2/12 at 11:33pm

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #42 of 59

When I ate them in L.A. and Mexico meat was shredded nt ground beef; Rinsing it just takes out all the flavor of the meat where as draining in a China Cap leaves at least some.

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post #43 of 59

I marinade a two pund top sirloin cut thin in:

 

2 garlic cloves, minced
Pinch of cumin
1 teaspoon of ground New Mexico chilies
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
White pepper
juice from 1 lime
¼ cup olive oil
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

 

for an hour the cook it medium rare over a very hot grill. Let it rest for ten minutes, the chop it into small pieces,

 

Garnish with chopped cilantro, Pico de Gallo, roasted onions, roasted Jalapenos, avocado slices,  and lime slices. Serve with freshly steamed  4 inch white corn tortillas, 2 per taco.

post #44 of 59

Just for giggles thought I would throw this in.

I add about a tablespoon of fresh ground coffee in the mix for a bit added depth.

Grind it really fine and use dark roast. Italian, or French roasts.

Use sparingly or you muddy the flavors.

post #45 of 59

No offense but Taco Bell has to be the least authentic Mexican taco meat I have ever tasted.   I only only gag them down when I can't find anything else to eat.   This comes from someone who is a native Texan and travels Mexico extensively.  I am curious why anyone would want meat to taste like that.   Tasteless, but that is my opinion.  Again no offense but I just don't get that someone would want to duplicate Taco Bell.

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonJuane View Post

No offense but Taco Bell has to be the least authentic Mexican taco meat I have ever tasted.   I only only gag them down when I can't find anything else to eat.   This comes from someone who is a native Texan and travels Mexico extensively.  I am curious why anyone would want meat to taste like that.   Tasteless, but that is my opinion.  Again no offense but I just don't get that someone would want to duplicate Taco Bell.

I absolutely agree.

 

While the title of the thread is "authentic" what the OP is actually referring to is found in his second post where he clarifies the details.

I have highlighted the important bits.

 

 

Quote:
Thanks for the response. I am from Indiana, so I'm quite positive that what I am talking about as authentic style mexican is far different that someone from other parts of the country. The restaurants that I am referring to are mostly family owned and operated usually with one or two of the employees speaking passable English while the rest can recognize words from the menu and not much else. More and more of these restaurants have been popping up here in the last couple years, as the Fresh-Mex boom has FINALLY made its way to the mid-west. At least here, ground beef is far more popular than shredded. You can order shredded at most places, but most dishes coming out of the kitchen with beef are definately the ground variety except for carne asada tacos and such. And that goes for tacos, burritos, enchilades, etc. It is a very very fine grind though. Almost mushy in texture. I would assume it is ran through a food processor, but that is just a guess.
 
There are no visible signs of fresh onions, garlic, or chilis although the flavors are all there with garlic being the lightest of the three. One explanation could be that they are cooked with fresh, then processed though. A peppery, possibly chile punch are there, but it is not so overpowering like a packet. Its deeper, which would maybe make you think fresh chilis?
 
There are virtually no ethnic fresh food markets around my area. Limited varieties of chilis are available, but I honestly don't know what I could find because I do not shop for peppers often. Most of my dried stuff, I buy online. The restaurants I frequent are about 75/25 white to mexican. Reason being most likely because we do not have a large mexican population. There are a few tex/mex restaurants that my wife likes, and I've never ever seen a mexican person in one of those joints. Finally, I've never paid much attention to the hot sauces on the tables because I don't really use it much.

 

What he seems to be describing to me is ground meat that has been tenderized by raising it's PH.  

Which isn't just a TacoBell thing - it is simply the most recognizable use of the process.

 

Thus the entire point of my post.  

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #47 of 59

Boiling the ground meat down method will result in something more like Taco Bell - when I was growing up back east, it was the way we made "steamers" or sloppy joes by boiling this way -- the kind of consistency many people seem to like in a taco.

post #48 of 59

Try a combo of salt, pepper, sugar, chili powder, beef granules or base, paprika, flour,dried minced onion, onion powder, garlic powder, and, to your liking, cayenne pepper.
 

post #49 of 59

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:35am
post #50 of 59

Mexican Chorizo is a type of sausage. It is made with a combination of beef and ground pork, unlike sausage in the U.S., which is made mostly from Pork alone. That is why the texture is softer. The red color comes from Annato seeds that are crushed into a paste called Achiote. Flavor comes from the Achiote paste as well as other herbs and spices. Actually, in the area where my family lives (Veracruz) they sell pre-mixed ground beef/pork. It is more expensive to buy only beef so it is rare to see.

post #51 of 59

Hold on a secund!!!! I am an spanish speaker and there is not such a thins as two different languages between spanish and castellano. It is just barely as brittish and american english or as French from France and french from Quebec. Is mustly a matter of accent and vocabulary use. Some people in Spain dont use the Spanish as a regular language if you go to Barcelona for example where they speak Catalan, if you go to Anadalucia they also have a dialect or if you go to Galician Province where they speak a dialect cold gallego. But Spanish and Castellano are THE SAME........

post #52 of 59

Sandra Glo, my mother's name was Glo, confounded people of course, because they wanted to spell it Glow.  Is it a family name?

post #53 of 59

Hello Rue Clerk. Sorry for my delay in the answer but I've being very busy lately. I can imagine the confusion about he last name lolololo but this is just a nick composition for my 2 last name..... Anyways nice to keep in touch. Have a great day:

 

Sandra

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post

I'm in Oregon, and a friend from Maine thinks Mexican food here is way too spicy. He also knows ...


It is almost impossible to predict any version of what some consider Mexican food in Ohio or New Brunswick or anywhere outside Mexico, imo, ...
You confused? I am too :^)

I worked for a Mexican in New Brunswick for a bit, that was Mexican food to me, haven't seen a Mexican here since but I'll never get sick of Tacos. Had to go because i couldn't understand him when he was mad.

If a Mexican is cooking the beef its Mexican. Otherwise its just another delicious taco filing to me. I miss Carlos yelling at me, best tacos ever.
post #55 of 59

I grew up in San Diego and was only served ground beef tacos at Taco Bell. Dont get me wrong tho I love Taco Bell but authentic tacos to me  have shredded beef, pork or chicken.

post #56 of 59
I think this is what you are looking for? Seems like the secret is In the boiling... Going to give it a try tonight...
http://mrsquartermaster.blogspot.com/2012/03/restaurant-style-ground-beef.html?m=1
post #57 of 59

Don't think there is an authentic Mexican ground beef. Are you referring to US tacos, enchiladas, Taco Bell type beef? Then it's not Mexican. As many other posters have said, you use slow cooked chunks for burritos, shredded for tacos, tostadas, enchiladas. Ground beef is for Taco Bell. There are a number of recipes for Taco Bell ground beef burritos and such. Not the same as 'authentic'. 

 

As in living in Central America or whatnot. 

 

You could look into 'copycat' websites if you are looking at the Taco Bell type stuff. Authentic is much more complex. Flavors range all over the map. So you need to be a tad more specific as to the flavors, really picante/spicey, or more towards Central America (which I love because it's wonderfully flavorful but won't burn your face off like New Mexico will. NM is REALLY OVERRATED!!!!) 

 

So, just saying...

 

April

post #58 of 59

OK, wait...are we talking Taco Bell, Chili, or real Mexican Food?

 

Taco bell mixes water, flour and such and then simmers with the typical "taco" spices. Makes it into a thick paste-ish stuff. 

 

Chili isn't really "Mexican". It varies all over the map.

 

What are we talking about?

 

So confused....

 

April

post #59 of 59

Man, I've posted a lot of stupid stuff in the past. I hope I'm getting more un-stupid as time goes on.

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