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post #61 of 89
wow what cool questions
ok heres a couple and no googling
what is the link between kiwi fruit and latex?
whats the difference between a pavlova and a meringue?
whats another name for a feijoa?
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #62 of 89
anaphylaxis aka "allergic reaction" Apparently whatever molecule causes allergic reaction to one is so much like the molecule that causes allergic reaction to the other that... [cough, cough, swell]. Avocado, bananas, melons, tomatoes (I think), too. Allergic to gloves, allergic to guacamole. Sucks.

Stumped. Thought they were the same. When you tell me the difference, can you tell me something about the history of Pavlovas? I like them quite a bit. They originated in the antipodes, didn't they?

Pineapple guava. My mother-in-law grew them in Whittier.

kiwi, feijoa, Pavlova... are you from NZ? ON EDIT: Duh. Just noticed the legend on your post. Uhmmm. Are you Xena?

BDL
post #63 of 89
Thread Starter 
Awesome, putting them on my wish list. I got "present credit" cause no one knows what to get me, even me. So LaRousse (sp) is another book then? making for a total of three?



wouldn't want to watch, but wouldn't be bothered doing it. Used to help grind meat for the local butcher as a kid (friend of the family and my Grandma ran an antique store in the same building). Still remember the queasy sensation the first time i saw a fresh side of beef twitch after hooking and helping lift it to the over rail. Had no problem moving and cutting it, just didn't like to watch it twitch on a hook. otherwise, labor intensive but very cool. Bravo
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #64 of 89

nearly there bdl

the link between kiwi fruit and latex is they both have the same enzymes in them, kiwifruit have 144 enzymes and latex have some of those, so if your allergic to one your allergic to the other , same with the aniphilatic thingy
meringue are crunchy all the way through, pavlova is crunchy on the outside and soft and marshmellowy in the middle, pavlova has vinegar and cornstarch in it where as meringue doesnt hence the texture difference
if you listen to us kiwis then we invented the pavlova in the 1930s for the ballerina anna pavlova , cant remember who the chef was, if you listen to them australians :smoking: their the ones that invented it for the same pperson , but dont you listen to them australians :roll::roll::roll::lol::lol:

feijoas are just the most delicious fruit ever, i hope you got to try them. and yes im from New Zealand , in Auckland

and no im not xena , im too short to be a warrior princess:lol::lol:
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #65 of 89
Yes, LaRousse is the author's name and shorthand for the book which is The LaRousse Gastronomique. It's a sort of encyclopedia of cooking -- filled with all sorts of wonderful information and recipes. Not all the information is right and not all the recipes are good which is part of the fun.

Escoffier's Guide Culinaire seems very removed from today's cooking. Pellaprat's Mastering the Art of French Cooking aka The Great Book of French Cooking less so. If you go for MAFC, I recommend trying to find one of the older 1970s or '80s editions. More recipes, incredible color illustrations with fussy, fifties presentations. The most recent edition has an introduction and some editing by Jeremiah Tower, but even so, it's not as good.

I learned most of what I know about "classic French cooking" and cooking in general from the 60s editition. Given that you already know how to cook, I think you'll really love it. It's not the ideal book to learn to cook from.

Aha!

Gabrielle then.

I'm giving myself full marks for the allergy association, and you for the Pavlova stump. Yes, I've had feijoa and really like it. Have you had durian? It is the ripe brie of south-east asian fruits. Or maybe the Nijinsky.

BDL
post #66 of 89
i smelt durian when i was in singapore, would just love to try it, i had a little bit in a chocolate but i really dont think i could be a good judge of its taste with such a small amount
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #67 of 89
I'll try a couple for you...

1. How would you select and prepare a starfish?

2. How would you traditionally make rennet?

3. How would you store fresh eggs without refridgeration in a tropical climate, how long would you expect them to last?

4. And finally one that I got hit with a couple of years ago....you are to provide the catering for a traditional banquet celebrating the feast of Beltane...what would you serve and why?
post #68 of 89
BDL -

Tinted Curing Mix. Basicly its just to help hold it on the shelf for a longer period of time and is also used to well tint the meat pink.

So you were spot on. :smoking:

Whos keeping track of right and wrong anwsers?
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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post #69 of 89
I'm going to quit while I'm ahead. I'm all in favor of keeping a running quiz going but I'm going to reserve the right to not feel obligated to answer anymore. I hope other people keep asking and answering. I promise to come up with some more questions later.

That said, I don't want to duck out without admitting that the starfish stumped me.

The Beltane question was a good one. I especially liked that it came out of a real experience. The first thing I'd do if asked to cater a feast was ask the clients to identify their particular religious orientation. That is, were they Wiccan and did they want a Faerie Feast with marigold custard and all the trimmings, were they more interested in cooking beef over an open fire, were they followers of Pan and want food with reputations as aphrodisiacs, or ....

The egg and rennet questions are merely technical. Rennet -- scrape a cow's stomach. Eggs -- much more interesting question. There are a lot of ways to hold eggs outside of a refrigerator; and surprisingly most of them are almost as good. Burying in shaded dry sand, burying in shaded wet sand, coating in lard, submerged in acidulated water, submerged in lime water, holding in an open basket, to name a few. My understanding is that all of these methods are roughly equal. However, you may be thinking of some special way . Under tropical conditions, I'd guess that nearly all the eggs would survive at least a month for most of the storage methods; but that it would be highly problematic after two. Just guessing.

Anyway, the spotlight was fun for awhile but now it's giving me sunburn. Let's just throw the questions up to anyone and everyone.

BDL
post #70 of 89
"Stumped. Thought they were the same. When you tell me the difference, can you tell me something about the history of Pavlovas? I like them quite a bit. They originated in the antipodes, didn't they?"

There is a "controversy" over the country of origin, but they are named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. I did have to go back to the "book" to make sure that I got my reference right.

Bo Friberg says that the "Pavlova Cakes" was published in New Zealand in 1929 during the year of Pavlova's Australian tour. These Pavlova cakes were individual desserts.

In 1934 the owner of a hotel where Pavlova stayed during the 1929 tour had her chef create a new dessert and he came up with a dessert that served several people. Legend has it that someone declared that it was "as light as Pavlova."

So in Friberg's book, New Zealand gets credit for the original individual Pavlovas and Australia for the larger one.
post #71 of 89
iz,

Very cool.

Thanks,
BDL
post #72 of 89
Having spent a little time reading round a few other threads, I can now see why this thread was put together...looking forward to seeing you announce a book, I think there is a market for a good technique orientated book.

I will leave the starfish question out there to see if someone else has a go at it.

Rennet - needs to be made from the 4th stomach of a milk-fed calf, once the animal has started eating significant amounts of solids the lining contains much less chymosin and high levels of pepsin and can only be used for a few types of cheese. The chopped stomach is placed in saltwater or whey, acidulated with wine or vinegar and left for 24 hours - the rennet is then filtered out of the solution.

Eggs - I spent a fair bit of time working on large sail powered yachts were refridgeration was minimal or non-existant, this forces you to get fairly creative about food storage, and I'm not going to mention having the kitchen tilted over at 30 degrees whilst it slams into oncoming waves!
The key thing is to prevent them dehydrating, so anything that helps seal the egg will preserve them - we used to coat them with vaseline as lard melted and made an awful mess. We found that the shells started to break down after around three weeks in acidulated water, and lasted only around ten days if stored in the open air. If the eggs are well sealed then they will last 3-4 months.

Beltane - I'd hoped you might get a chuckle out of that one, it's the sort of thing that could come through the door of many a kitchen without prior warning. In my case they were Wiccan, but they did regard it as being somewhere between a celebration of spring produce and a celebration of fertility, the colour red was significant. We produced a spread of rustic lamb and poultry dishes that used lilac, rose petals and lavendar along with a selection of wild herbs and flowers that was well received.
post #73 of 89
Miraz,

Great new information. Thanks for it.

Rennet: Interesting details, it's nice to start filling in some gaps.

Eggs: I read a study on folkway methods of egg preservation 5 or 10 years ago, and vaseline didn't score well in comparison to some of the other methods. The study was conducted either by or for some sort of Eco-hippy magazine and wasn't large enough to be more than statistically suggestive -- so take it FWIW. My impression was the authors' methodology was careful and appropriate. But, IIRC, there was no analysis -- which presents a false impression in a way because lay people tend to over value the predictive power of small samples. I loved the whole "Shipwrecked" theme.

Star fish: I don't get stumped much on fish, and am really looking forward to the answer. Rattling around somewhere in the great void inside my skull, was the impression that somewhere somehow people ate some sort of star fish.

Beltane: People are endlessly fascinating. Amazing the things they get up to, isn't it?

Thanks again,
BDL
post #74 of 89
I've come across Starfish recipes in Japan, Greece and the Pacific Islands - there are few different cultures out there that do eat them - but it is an acquired taste! So far I've resisted the temptation to hand one to an interviewee just to see what they would do with it...

I have a feeling that I might have read the same article - we tried a number of things but the vaseline worked best on a boat, on some of the longer passages we were at sea for 10-12 weeks (NZ->Med via the southern ocean) and carried enough to feed 25 people for that time with minimal spoilage.

The Beltane thing was an interesting project, I always enjoy exploring new areas of cuisine and there is a certain resonance between our profession and pagan religions that celebrate nature.
post #75 of 89
Chum, sockeyes, and chinook are all species of what very common and well-loved food fish?


Salmon
Kate
Carp
Escolar



This is an easy one:::


What is the most common name for Dolphinfish?
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post #76 of 89
Dolphinfish is probably best known as mahi mahi among most west coast English speakers. But dorado is another common name around here among Hispanics, sport fishers and everyone who goes down the coast to Baja, PV, Acapulco, etc.

The other widdle fishies are salmon. You're going to be eating a lot more of those species because this years' King salmon run is lousy, Bad King runs expected for the next few years, too. :mad:

BDL
post #77 of 89
salmon, you forgot pink, a.k.a. humpy and coho a.k.a. silver.
chinooks, are king there are red and white, which are marketed as ivory or glacier salmon. Chum also called dog salmon are marketed as Keta. and of course sockeye are the famous reds.

mahi mahi
post #78 of 89
Hey BDL, you know what? It just dawned on me, lawyers are wrong half the time! :)
post #79 of 89
At best!:roll::beer::crazy::smoking::eek:
post #80 of 89
What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen Sparrow?

How many licks does it take to get to the tootsie roll center of a tootsie pop?

Where's the Beef?

Why does the silly rabbit never get the Trix?

Name four things Bullwinkle pulls out of the hat.

What was Sherman to Mr. Peabody.

How exactly does Cheez-it get all that flavor into that little cracker?

What were the full character names of the Castaways?
post #81 of 89
Is that the common grey sparrow, or the red breasted sparrow?....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #82 of 89
I was a grip on Rescue From Gilligan's Island In fact, if you want to know what I look like, look at the cover of TV Guide. That's me holding the shiny board, swimming along with the raft, as it floated in the ocean. IIRC Rescued was the first time all of the characters' names were given.

On a personal note, although there's a "thou shall not cross" caste barrier between cast and crew, Bob Denver and I became buddies during the shoot, and remained friends afterwards. It's difficult to see him as anything other than silly because he wore the clown mask so well. He was a very decent man, who worked much harder at his comedy than anyone knew. He approached physical slapstick with the attitude of a dancer/athlete -- constantly practicing not only the routine but "the basics." He died way too young.

FWIW, Alan Hale Jr., and Jim Backus were very accessible as well. Hale was a very lonely guy who loved to talk. He spent no time at all in his or anyone's trailer -- if he wasn't working, he was on the set watching and talking. At the time, I was too young to appreciate the person behind the need. But if I wasn't working, I listened when he talked and occasionally asked questions which made me better than most in his eyes. Probably for that reason, Hale remembered me and looked me up through Bob, a couple of years after Rescue, to cater a party for him. It was one of the last parties I ever did.

Backus, by the time of Rescue, was already very old and not particularly well. He was the King of the Cast and enjoyed holding court. They liked sitting around and hearing how it used to be from him too. They were professional actors -- not a professional audience so that ought to give you an idea of how well he could tell a story. Very funny guy, lots of great stories, and of course the voices. A pleasure to be around.

The Ginger I worked with was Judi Baldwin. Tina Louise had the reputation of a world-class be-yotch. Bob and the rest of the cast were outspokenly grateful that she wasn't on Rescue. Never met her myself, just sayin' is all. Baldwin did the sequel MOW, Castaways; but not the third MOW, Globetrotters. Backus was so ill by the time they shot Globetrotters they wrote him out. He insisted on working, so Sherwood made a few changes and wrote a little scene for him. Bob told me

Anyway, Gilligan (they ducked giving the "full name" in Rescue, but I've googled it since and found it may have been Willie Gilligan), Jonas Grumby (Skipper), Thurston Howell III, Eunice Wentworth Howell (Lovey), Marianne Summers, Ginger Grant, and Roy Hinkley.

BDL
post #83 of 89
What the balls BDL, haha, I thought you were done anwsering. If I knew you were going to anwser them, I would have made them harder.

Here, Ill go start a new topic where we can just post questions for anyone to anwser. :chef:
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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post #84 of 89

Four Cuts of Chuck

I'm not doing this to stump BDL, rather, it's something I really want to know and which has been bothering me for quite a while.

My recollection is that there are four basic cuts to a chuck roast - one is the neck, another may be the center cut. Are these correct, and what are the other cuts? For extra points, what is the difference in muscle structure and fat between these four cuts?

Signed,

Puzzled in Pacoima
post #85 of 89
Its more like this. There are supposed to be 4 parts

Base/Vehicle: Can be edible or not. Just something to carry the product for easily handlin and eating.

Spread/Dressing: What ever you want to call it but it is optional and is if the item needs it.

Filling: main compenint

Garnish: IMO optional but hey its classical.

BTW. Ive enjoyed this thread so far
post #86 of 89
In Pacoima, Ese?

I'm a little puzzled by the term "chuck roast." There are several chuck roasts in the chuck primal. The primal itself is divided into the following sup-primals and cuts: Blade roast, blade steak, cross-rib, arm roast, 7 bone roast, top blade steak, shoulder pot roast, mock tender, under blade, short ribs, and flanken ribs.

You should bookmark the "ask the meatman" site; and if you're anatomically hip, there's a site called "bovine myology." Both very good, complete sites.

Puzzled in Monrovia,
BDL
post #87 of 89
Yes, the primal. Ever since Merle Ellis went off the air and stopped writing his column, and Lenny's on Shattuck closed, I've had no sources for meat references. Thanks for the pointers. In any case, I thought the neck was part of that big primal. My mom used to buy neck meat and tenderloin to grind into hamburger.

The difference in cuts from the primal may be a result of the history and origin of meat cutting on the different coasts.

shel
post #88 of 89
Shel,

Well, at least the neck is from the same end of the beef as the chuck. The tenderloin, not so much. When your mom said "neck," the butcher knew what part of the chuck she and the other NJMs meant. It might be the same place "stew meat" comes from, I just don't know enough to guess.

There are lots of regional differences in meat cut names -- which I mostly learned about barbecuing and in barbecue forums (or fora if you insist). However, I believe the list of Chuck subprimals and cuts I listed are standard names used throughout the country. I skipped over some of the really small cuts, like the "flat iron steak," which is taken by cutting across the top-blade, but I don't think that's what you're getting at.

BDL
post #89 of 89
When mom said tenderloin, she meant the real tenderloin. Neck is part of the chuck primal - checked it out at the bovine myology site just to be sure. http://bovine.unl.edu/bovine3D/eng/S..._id=1056388973 That was the hamburger I ate growing up. I honestly don't know how good that combination was. Mom was an awful cook, however, the meat burnt well. She could reallyget a char on it :smoking:

Some day I'll tell you about her "smoke alarm" beef patties <LOL>

scb
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