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post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Nicko:

I just joined your forum and I subscribed to your newsletter. It is such a wonderful feeling to be part of a group that shares my passion for good food.

I would like to take this opportubnity to say hello to everybody in this forum. I am looking forward to participating in your discussions.

Thank you Nicko and all the others who are responsible for making this possible.

Best regards,

Papa :)
"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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post #2 of 29
Hi Papa...

Welcome to chef talk.
We are very happy to have with us and look forward to your participation in the boards.
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 29
Hi Papa,

Another nutmegger!
Pleasure to meet ya.
post #4 of 29
Hey, I just reliezed I have over 1000 posts!

I got to find another hobbie :eek:
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 29
Thank you Tseanduran.

I see your in Maylasia...
Can you tell us a little about yourself and what you are doing?
Are you a student
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #6 of 29
Hello, Papa, and welcome to the Cafe. I see we'll soon have to start a Connecticut forum here! Is it in the water, or what?
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #7 of 29
Welcome to Chef Talk!
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #8 of 29
welcome!!
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

I just wanted to say how much I appreciated your messages.

Thank you for making me feel so welcome! You are a very special group!

Best regards,

Papa
"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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post #10 of 29
Hey Papa Smurf!

An Olive Oil consultant? Sounds like a dream job! How do you like it? What's your fav?

Have you seen the article in the last Cooks Illustrated that compared store brands?

(oh, and Welcome!)
post #11 of 29
Does everyone remember the banner we had up about a week ago for Papa's Haven Olive Oil? Well our new member Papa is that Papa. So feel free to ask him questions about olive oil, and also check out his very informative web site www.papashaven.com
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Anneke:

Thank you for your warm welcome!

Olive oil is a passion of mine. I believe that this passion for olive oil was instilled in me the moment I was baptized.

In Greek tradition, olive oil has purification qualities. During baptism, the godparent scrubs certain parts of the body of the baby with extra virgin olive oil to assure that it will grow up to be of good moral character. They scrub the hands so that the baby never steals, the mouth so that the baby never tells lies, etc.... It was that moment that I first tasted olive oil and I believe it left a long lasting impression on me.

I grew up in a family of restaurateurs and olive oil farmers. It was destined for me to develope the passion for this wonderful gift of nature.

I am afraid that I cannot answer your second question about which olive oil is the best. There are so many great olive oils produced around the world that I am afraid I might forget to mention some. Olive oil, and food in general, is a very personal affair. What is great to me might be merely good to another expert or vice versa. I will be more than happy to answer any other questions you might have about olive oil, its organoleptic qualities, cooking methods, etc....

I hope I answered your questions.

Best regards,

Papa
"Olio nuovo e vino vecchio"
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post #13 of 29
Papa,

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
I felt your passion behind that post.
as I have grown in the world of chefs and hospitality I have really learned to respect things for the way mother nature intended it to be. I include Olive oil and wine with that.
when I think of italian antipasto as an example...how simple it is,but you need to understand that it is ok to let nature sing in your food,simply grilled and roasted veggies drizzled with some wonderful fruity olive oil a pinch of salt and a few turn of your pepper mill and you have perfect food,ok a nice loaf of bread would be nice to.nature offers us an incredible array of produce to enjoy, Thank god that we in this era have the opputunity to still enjoy the finest the soil has to offer. Boy am I rambling, Maybe because it's V day and getting warmed up :)
Hey papa, maybe you can share with the community how olive oil is made,from what olives ,how are there graded etc. I have a question for you. When the olives are pressed and go into the centerfuge to seperate the oils what happins to the juice?
Is it tossed or is there a market for it?
TIA
Cape Chef Fellow nutmegger

BTW Papa, Who do you use for a distributer in the tri state area? Or are you direct seller to buyer?

[ 02-14-2001: Message edited by: cape chef ]
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #14 of 29
Great question Cape Chef. I've always wondered that too.

Two months ago I was walking in the olive groves of Southern Spain and got to touch and feel a fresh olive in my hands. What an experience. It's amazing how a tender fruit that stains your hands like blueberries and tastes aweful can be turned into such wonderous products. Given that fresh olives are used for oil, I imagine the olive juice must be pretty nasty...?
post #15 of 29
I have to ask, and I mean no disrespect, but why did you choose the nick papa?
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #16 of 29
On vacation in Morocco, we visited a big pottery factory, where we learned that the enormous black plumes of smoke coming from the kilns result from the burning of olive pits. I was impressed by how they make use of every part of the olive. I never did think about the juice.
post #17 of 29
Momoreg
That's very interesting. Do you remember if there was a smell? What was it like?
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

I would like to take this opportunity to respond to some of the interesting inquiries made yesterday about the olive oil production process and the uses to which the resulting “waste” material are put. Although greater detail may be found on my website, a brief description of the methods used to implement this process and the resulting materials may be more appropriate for this venue.

PRODUCTION METHODS

In order to extract the precious oil from the mesocarp, or flesh cells, of the olive fruit, the extraction process naturally focuses on the separation of the oil and supplementary liquids from the solid material.

Washing the harvested olives with potable water and removing the leaves are the preliminary steps in this ancient process. The foreign material, if left, would adversely affect the flavor of the resulting product and damage the modern equipment that is currently used.

Crushing the olives with either stone mills or metal crushers produces a paste with easily extracted oil droplets within the resulting crushed substance. The older of the two methods is the use of stone crushers consisting of a stone base and upright millstones enclosed in a metal basin. There are usually scrapers to clean the millstones and paddles and blades to circulate and expel the paste. This process ensures that the paste is not overheated (which would adversely affect the flavor of the oil), the oil is not contaminated with the metal and the emulsified paste produced is easy to extract. Due to the consistency and texture of the paste that this process produces, stone crushed olive oil is usually combined with pressing, although sometimes centrifugation is used. The difficulties associated with this process are the slowness of the bulky machinery, the cost and the fact that the equipment cannot be continuously operated.

Metal crushers rotate at high speed throwing the olives against a metal grating. The oil is usually extracted from the paste by continuous centrifugation. The advantages include speed, continuous operation, low cost and high output. The primary disadvantages include the likelihood for metal contamination and high temperatures which damage the flavor of the oil. In addition, this process produces a paste which contains smaller droplets of oil, more emulsified, and therefore harder to extract.

Mixing or beating the paste prepares the paste for separation of the oil from the pomace. This part of the process is important if the paste was made from metal crushers. This process will maximize the amount of oil to be extracted from the paste by breaking up the oil/water emulsion and forming larger oil droplets. (If the speed, time and temperature devoted to the process are miscalculated, a stronger emulsion with oil more difficult to extract will result.)

Extraction of the “liquid gold” is accomplished by pressing, percolation or centrifugation. Pressing is the oldest and most common method of oil extraction by applying pressure to stacked mats, smeared with paste, that alternate with metal disks. The oil is then expressed through a central spike. The advantages of this method include the use of simple, reliable machinery and little initial investment; the low energy requirement; a resulting pomace that is low in moisture/liquid content and precious little oil is lost to the water component. The disadvantages include a high labor intensity and the production is, therefore, not continuous.

Percolation incorporates the use of a metal plate dipped into the mixed paste which in theory becomes wetted with oil, and not with oil mixed with water, when withdrawn. The oil then drips off the plate. The disadvantage of this process is that it is inefficient because the wet pomace remaining still contains a great deal of olive oil. That is why the percolation process, if used at all, is usually combined with another process such as pressing or centrifugation, discussed below; however, the high initial cost and energy requirements, the resulting wet pomace and a high amount of remaining olive oil still attached to water make this procedure less than ideal.

Centrifugation uses high-speed centrifuges that extract the oil from the beaten paste through a fine screen. The advantages include speed of process, efficient and compact equipment/machinery and low labor requirement. The disadvantages include a high investment cost for equipment and trained personnel, high energy requirements, a pomace with a high moisture content and lost oil still attached to the water.

The three methods produce oil must and pomace. The oil must consists of edible olive oil and vegetable water. Centrifugal decanting is used to separate the oil from the water with the help of the naturally different densities of these liquids. Concentric spinning tanks pull off the oil, and the vegetable water drains into lower tanks.

The “waste” consists of solid and liquid waste. The solid waste uses include: (1) Fuel, (2) Fertilizer/Mulch, (3) Herbicide, (4) Animal Feed, (5) Road Construction Material, (6) Olive Bricks and (7) Worm Breeding Material.

The most exciting use is fuel due to the extremely high cost of energy sources around the world. In Jordan, the primary use of pressing waste is fuel to heat households and power kilns. If completely dried, the solid waste is pressed into logs for burning yielding extremely intense burning and an aromatic scent. Commercially sold charcoal consists in part of dried solid olive waste. This fuel source is environmentally non-polluting and biodegradable. The Turkish Daily News recently reported that Selcuk Gida has applied to the Energy Ministry for permission to produce energy from the olive oil cake. This kind of energy production would be a first in Turkey. The energy power station will cost $20 million and be established in Aydin’s Germencik district. Sixty percent of the energy will be sold to Turkey Electric Distributing Company (TEDAS). The company Selcuk Gida is known to consumers of dried fruit which is sold under the Eagle Brand.

As a component of fertilizer and mulch, the olive waste should be mixed with soil and bark and should not be concentrated over the olive tree roots because the roots may burn. Usually, the olive waste is distributed around an orchard or farm and it serves as a natural herbicide, discouraging grass and weed growth. Some American farmers have reported the emergence of red clover where previously none existed. Red clover is a dynamic accumulator of nitrogen and phosphorous, and the presence of red clover (trifolium protense) is also an indicator of potassium.

This olive residue material is also a component of feed for animals such as cattle and poultry; however, goats and sheep eat it “straight” separating the edible portion from the woody parts. Americans use tons of the olive waste mixed with bitumen as a component of road construction material. Olive bricks, although lighter than traditional bricks, are also created from this solid residue as well as breeding material for worm breeding farms.

The chemical analysis of the solid waste consists of: nitrogen (1.18%), phosphorous (0.14%), potassium (2.03%), sulphur ( 0.11%), calcium (0.18%), magnesium (0.09%), sodium (0.02%), manganese (110 ppm), zinc (8 ppm), copper (4.2 ppm), cobalt (0.26 ppm), boron (26.4 ppm), molybdenum (0.16 ppm), cadmium (0.39 ppm), lead (10.01 ppm), mercury (<0.001 ppm), organic carbon (54%), moisture content (23.8%) and PH of 4.7.

The liquid waste water, according to ancient Roman texts, was used as a herbicide and insecticide. Modern research, however, has not yet uncovered viable uses to which this waste can be put. On the contrary, science has warned against depositing this substance into lakes, rivers or the sea due to the polyphenol. The acidity renders an excess of this waste water phytotoxic which can result in pollution.


In answer to the question of how I came to be called “Papa”, the nickname was given to me many, many years ago as a compliment which I could not begin to earn if I lived a thousand years. As a boy, I was stricken with wanderlust which was inspired by the literature written by such authors as John Steinbeck, Victor Hugo, Dostoyevsky, Hemingway, Kazantzakis, and many, many other wonderful writers. I traveled across different continents and worked at various jobs to pay for these voyages. These odd jobs usually involved animals or hunting in some way because they were often seasonal and universal in job descriptions. The people I met taught me so much and, since DVD’s and MTV were not exactly in vogue in places like the former Soviet Union, Hungary and the Greek islands, the men shared their sports activities with me as well as story telling in the evening, usually over a fire for cooking and/or warmth purposes. I came to love hunting, deep sea fishing, literature, fine Cuban cigars, wonderful traditional food and “real” people (not the kind you meet as a tourist). My friends at home, however well meaning but regrettably overstated, likened my interests to those of Ernest Hemingway who is fondly known to his admirers as “Papa”.
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post #19 of 29
Papa,

Thank you for that wonderful , detailed reply to our questions.I just went to your web site and found it most enjoyable..I recommend everyone check out papa's page.
Also great story on how you got your name.

cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #20 of 29
Thanks for teaching us something, Papa. I went to your website too. Very informative, and nicely designed, too.
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

The FDA decided to regulate health claims that companies make about their products on internet sites. There is currently a loophole in the current legislation that restricts FDA regulations to product labeling controls.

So, what can you believe about the claims that olive oil companies make about this wonderful gift of nature? In order to clarify matters, I decided to write the following posting for you (which, like my previous posting, does not appear on my web site and it is written for Chef Talk members). I hope you enjoy it.

OLIVE OIL AND ITS HEALTH BENEFITS.

A recent paper* published by Dr. Chopra's research group at the Northern Ireland Center for Diet and Health, University of Ulster, had some interesting conclusions.

Health benefits from lycopene in tomato products have been suggested to be related to its antioxidant activity. Dietary fat may influence the absorption and hence the antioxidant activity of lycopene. The study compared the effect of consumption of tomato products with extra-virgin olive oil versus sunflower oil. The different oils did not affect the absorption of the lycopene into the body, but the tomato/olive oil combination generated increased plasma antioxidant activity by around 20%. Therefore one conclusion drawn from the research was that it would seem that consumption of tomato products with olive oil, but not with sunflower oil, improves the antioxidant activity of the plasma.

Researchers are faced with the question of whether the combination of tomato and olive oil does something synergistically, or whether the beneficial antioxidant effects are caused by olive oil alone. Extra virgin olive oil is particularly rich in the phenolic antioxidants as well as squalene and oleic acid, and high consumption of the foregoing in the diet provides considerable protection against colon, breast and skin cancer, coronary heart disease and aging by inhibiting oxidative stress. Research has shown that scavenging of the hydroxyl radical was significantly higher among extracts of olive oil. This effect was only minimal in seed oils. In addition to their direct antioxidant capacity, extracts of olive oil are also potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase activity. A constant high olive oil intake in the diet, especially extra virgin olive oil, provides a constant supply of antioxidants. This may reduce oxidative stress through inhibition of lipid peroxidation, a factor that is currently linked to a host of diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

There is a low incidence of skin cancer among Mediterranean populations, and olive oil consumption could be a contributing factor to this low cancer rate. Olive oil contains significantly higher amounts of squalene than seed oils, and squalene is to a large extent transferred to the skin. German researchers believe that this transfer mechanism is probably accomplished by scavenging singlet oxygen generated by ultraviolet light. Japanese scientists also claim that virgin olive oil applied to the skin after sunbathing could protect against skin cancer by slowing tumor growth.

Researchers at the University Hospital "Germans Trias Pujol" in Barcelona, Spain, compared the benefits of olive oil with safflower and fish oil on rats to determine if the type, and not just the amount, of fat in the diet had an impact on cancer tumor growth. They found that the research subjects on the olive oil diet had less precancerous tissue and fewer tumors than the animals fed the other oils.

The researchers believe constituents of olive oil, such as flavonoids, squalene and polyphenols, may help to protect against cancer. Flavonoids and polyphenols are antioxidants, which help prevent cell damage from oxygen-containing chemicals called free radicals.

Another study by researchers at the University of Oxford adds to the growing body of evidence that shows olive oil is as effective as fresh fruit and vegetables in keeping colon cancer at bay.

Dr Michael Goldacre and a team of researchers at the Institute of Health Sciences compared cancer rates, diets and olive oil consumption in 28 countries including European countries, the United States, Brazil, Colombia, Canada and China. Countries with a diet high in meat and low in vegetables had the highest rates of the disease and olive oil was associated with a decreased risk.

The researchers suspect olive oil protects against bowel cancer by influencing the metabolism of the gut. They think it cuts the amount of a substance called deoxycyclic acid and regulates the enzyme diamine oxidase which may be linked to cell division in the bowel.

A study in the March 27, 2000 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, which was produced by Dr. Ferrara's research team, shows that a diet high in MUFA from olive oil can also help reduce blood pressure levels.

Ferrara and his colleagues found that while consuming the extra-virgin olive oil diet, research subjects reduced the amount of antihypertensive medication necessary to control blood pressure levels by 48%, versus only a 4% reduction on the sunflower oil diet. In addition, eight subjects on the extra-virgin olive oil diet required no antihypertensive medications; all subjects on the sunflower oil diet required antihypertensive medication. The authors conclude that a diet lower in total fat and saturated fat and a diet that contains higher amounts of MUFA can lower blood pressure levels and reduce or eliminate the need for medications in people with hypertension.

So why does olive oil lower blood pressure? One possible reason is its polyphenol content. Polyphenols are potent antioxidants which help arteries dilate, thereby reducing blood pressure. Ten grams of extra-virgin olive oil contains five mg of polyphenols; sunflower oil has no polyphenols.

* Lee, A.; Thurnham, D.I.; Chopra, C. Consumption of Tomato Products with Olive Oil but not Sunflower Oil increases the Antioxidant Activity of Plasma. Free Radical Biology & Medicine, 29:1051-1055; 2000 [Nov. 15th, 2000 issue]

Papa
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post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

Based upon one of the questions posted earlier, I realized that I should explain how we get this wonderfully tasting fruit on our table from the bitter tasting raw olive.

This is the recipe I use to treat and store freshly harvested olives, which is free of chemicals and uses natural ingredients in the role of preservatives.

Wash your olives with drinkable water and then soak them in a 10% salt 90% water solution. Allow the olives to lose their bitterness, which can take up to 6 months, but sample regularly so when the bitterness is acceptable and the taste to your liking, remove the olives from that salt soaking solution. The process can be expedited by cutting a straight line through each olive with a knife.

Create a new solution with 1 part wine vinegar (to lower the ph) and 3 parts of a 6-8% salt solution.

Place olives in glass jars and make sure that the olives are well covered by the 75% salt solution (6%-8% salt) and the 25% wine vinegar mix. Add olive oil on the top to cover the whole mix.

You can be creative with the second mix. Dried basil, oregano, mustard seeds, chili peppers (crushed) and bay leaves could be added.

Remember that a lot depends on what type of olive tree is growing in your garden. Kalamata olives are picked when they turn black (ripened) while other olives are picked when they are green or red (halfway stage). Some people like to pick their olives in all three stages of ripening (green, red and black), do the initial treatment separately and then store them in the second mix together, thus creating a colorful mix with a variation of tastes.

Papa

PS. This information does not appear on my web site either and it was written for Chef Talk members.
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post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

Another request arrived privately today from a member of Chef Talk who was given a can of Olive Pomace Oil and wanted to know more about its quality. I thought that my answer might be of interest to some of you and decided to post it.

To begin with, olive oil is a world commodity, such as sugar or wheat, and, therefore, became the subject of the "International Olive Oil Agreement" in 1959. In light of the growing international trade, this agreement was designed to control the standards for the production and quality of olive oil and was administered by the International Olive Oil Council in Madrid, Spain. This agreement was amended in 1979 to include specific olive oil definitions and standards. The amendment requires that any product identified as "olive oil" be obtained exclusively from the olive and excluded from the definition is any oil from olives that is extracted by solvents (or re-esterification processes and any mixtures with other oils.

In other words, the designation "olive oil" cannot be applied to olive residue oils. An olive residue oil, by definition, is obtained by treating the olive residue, called pomace, (which is the substance
remaining from previous pressings) with solvents. It may be classified as "refined olive-residue oil" or "refined olive-residue oil and olive oil". These classifications are suitable for human consumption.

The latter classification has subcategories: Crude Olive-Pomace Oil, Refined Olive-Pomace Oil or Olive-Pomace Oil. It sounds like the one you are asking about is the last one.

Olive-Pomace Oil is a blend of refined olive-pomace oil and virgin olive oil fit for consumption as is. Once again, however, in no event whatsoever may it be called "olive oil" according to the International
Olive Oil Council rules.

To answer your last question, I would like to say that I would never recommend olive-pomace oil to anyone. It has a very poor quality ranking in the list of oils.

I hope this is of assistance to you.

Best regards,
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post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Cape Chef:

I am afraid that I missed your last question.

I do not have a distributor. My olive oils that I import are sold directly to companies for a variety of uses. My clientele includes retailers, salad dressing making companies, university research centers and cosmetics manufacturers.

If a distributor wants to contact me, I will be more than happy to talk with him/her.

Thank you for asking.
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post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who visited myweb site.

Thank you so much for your kind words too. My wife and I wrote the whole site. It took us over 2,000 hours, 6 bottles of wine and countless amounts of coffee to write the text. This is why your feedback means so much to me.

Thank you once again!
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post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Friends:

Here is another article that does not appear on my web site and was inspired by your questions. I hope you enjoy it.

JUDGE AN OLIVE OIL BY ITS COVER.

How many times have you wondered about why some olive oils come in clear bottles where you can see their color and some come in dark glass bottles?

The following information has been provided by Italian research scientists concerning the components of olive oil that provide great health benefits, are not found in the same abundance in other oils, contribute to its organoleptic qualities and enduring storage capacity and can be lost if subjected to light which makes proper storage of olive oil an important issue.

Olive oil is a very complex mixture of components which affect its stability. Research has shown that while polyphenols are important, tocopherols, phytosterols, and particularly avenasterol contribute to the olive oil’s antioxidant activity. While the polyphenols have been shown to be antioxidants, some polyphenols are better antioxidants than others, so the antioxidant effects do not simply reflect the total amount of polyphenols but rather the levels of those with the more potent antioxidant effects. It is possible that some olive oils may have lower amounts of these more potent antioxidants even though the total polyphenol levels are high. Some antioxidants can, under certain conditions, act as prooxidants thus increasing oxidation. This is why you should avoid clear olive oil bottles and purchase olive oil in dark glass bottles instead, and you should store your olive oil away from light and high temperatures. Many experts believe that olive oil sold in clear bottles and stored on the top shelf of a supermarket under strong lights lose some of their profound health benefits and flavor after being subjected to these conditions for a period of time.

Olive oils with a high polyphenols rate have a long preservation capacity. Polyphenols are antioxidant components and they are recognized as protective substances. Many experts believe that polyphenol contents in olive oil can indicate its quality and its real value.

"In olive oil, a high polyphenols rate is most important to preserve the integrity and benefits of the oil and to prevent ranking [deterioration/rancid quality]. We can say that phenolic substances, and not tocopherols, are the right inhibitors in this fat matter, and found more in olive oil rather than in seed oils. In fact, it has been determined that there exists a positive correlation between the polyphenols rate and the oxydation stability of virgin olive oils. It has also been noticed that a positive correlation exists also between polyphenols rate (especially phenolic acids) and organoleptic characters of the oil. " (Vitagliano M., Industrie Agrarie, UTET, Torino, 1982, pag. 664)

"The phenolic patrimony is the most precious characteristic of virgin olive oil, which is the only vegetal fat in which polyphenols are abundant. Such substances, which contribute to its typical ‘fruttato’ aroma as well as its ‘piccante’ and bitter taste, have a great antioxydant power. The extra virgin oil, thanks to these components, is the most preservable fat and the one with the highest biological value. For these reasons, in olive oils the polyphenols level determination represents one of the most significant analyses aiming to the determination of quality parameters." (AA.VV. Extravergine, Manuale per conoscere l'olio di oliva, Slow Food Editore, Bra, 2000, pag. 94)
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post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Dear Debin:

Thank you so much for your kind words!

This wonderful group has become very inspiring to me.

Thank you once again!
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post #28 of 29
Hey I would really like to see you guys move these topics to the Cook's corner or another more appropriate forum. They are great topics and they should be taking place in the right forum, and not the Beginner's Forum. I am locking this down, but I have posted some of the original questions and replies in the Cook's Corner.

Thanks.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #29 of 29
Dear Papa, I am thrilled to have found this page with so much information on olive oil. I am wild about olive oil and use a lot of it. I not only cook with it, but I use it whenever a family member gets indigestion. My daughter used it as an antacid when she was pregnant. It really works fast! All of the women in our family use it for tanning, and have no wrinkles. My doctor says, "That's not supposed to happen," as he stares at me in disbelief :) Now I am going to visit your web site. You and your wife sound like such warm and wonderful people.
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