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Smoking - Pro/Cons - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Not sure who did it first. They're both great. I found this today. I love his take on smoking.


YouTube - Bill Hicks on The David Letterman Show 1989
post #32 of 46
Just an antecdotal reply as I have no direct experience. When my father was diagnosed with cancer(oddly enough not tobacco related apparently) he was advised by his oncologist to quit smoking, which he did. Not long after that he commented at dinner one day, "I never knew how good food could taste". He went on to describe the flavors he could detect. He was a chemist and mathemetician by training and he attributed the difference to the quitting smoking as he had not yet started on chemotherapy etc. I have heard similar comments from people I know who have quit smoking over the years. Others have made no comment one way or the other.

Possible test for you. Eat a meal you like while smoking as normal. Then, if you can(I hear it is really difficult), quit smoking for 10 to 14 days and then have the same meal and see if you notice a difference.
post #33 of 46
Sounds good, if I can actually quit for 10-14 days ?
:smoking:WILL LOOK INTO IT
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #34 of 46
I am fascinated by the obsession that non-smokers have over smokers. Is it because they are repulsed when they have to sit in the same room as everyone!? I smoke (when i´m drinking) and for me smoke and booze is a bit like lamb and mint sauce. But i would never go up to a slightly over weight person eating cookies and say "hey fatty - stop eating those cookies if you want to live until your 60", so why the obsession with smoking. The media also always tries to find other reasons for people to stop - like "Stop Smoking - Stay Slim", "Stop smoking save money", "Stop smoking look better". People smoke becasue the LIKE it - like cookies or wine or any other substance that in large doses is bad for you - but why is smoking so much worse??
post #35 of 46
Not a completely true statement. I have had many people tell me they wish they had not started smoking. Some were for the reasons you mentioned i.e. cost or health concerns but many commented that they didn't like the taste or the smokers breath they had afterwards. Some disliked the smoke being in their clothes. Even with apparent regrets and dislikes for whatever reasons they all pretty much felt powerless to quit.

I have heard a few people mention the same kind of taste connection that you have made. Usually it is with a drink although not always an alcoholic drink.

The issue with non smokers is second hand smoke. A non cookie eater isn't going to have to be concerned with second hand cookie crumbs. :D
post #36 of 46
Hmm... not entirely true. An economist would cite negative externalities. A negative externality is something that is a product of a transaction that was not accounted for or paid for in that transaction and ends up affecting people outside the transaction.

Negative externalities related to smoking:

1. Air pollution
2. Litter (butts everywhere)
3. Reduced productivity at the workplace (from ill health, spoiled palates, smoke breaks, etc.)
4. Odors that other people have to smell on the smoker long after the smoking is over.

I could go on...
post #37 of 46
I love smoking. Minus the health factor. In some cases, to me, it makes some foods taste better. For example I love smoking after eating anything with potatoes in it. Whether it’s french fries, mashed potatoes, baked potatoes or even potato chips. There is just something about it that just taste great. It might be an acquired taste, but either way I love it. I quit smoking for a couple months too, a few years back and I never noticed a difference in the way it made my food taste. But I'm expecting a baby boy soon so I'm going to quit for my pregnant wife and him. It’s the least I can do for her.:smoking::mad:
post #38 of 46
Bravo! :bounce:

To all who DO want to become ex-smokers, I've heard that it takes most people about eleven tries before they finally do quit - most, but not all! So if you have tried before and think you just can't do it, remember that with each try you are that much closer to the time when you will succeed. :)
Vera
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Vera
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post #39 of 46
I smoke. I started at age 14. I quit for 6 years, in my 20's and then thought I could have an occasional one. No go.

I like smoking, though I know it's not healthy (and people remind me of that all the time, as if I never knew it). I don't smoke indoors and I hate being in a smoky room.

There's a friend I used to visit on weekends who smoked in his house, so I did too, in his house. I got headachy and couldn't taste food very well. Even if I smoked outside, inside was still smoky. There is a big difference to me when people smoke indoors, as far as how I feel and how food tastes.

I'm not saying that I think smoking done outdoors only, is less unhealthy, although logic tells me it probably is--but it does make a big difference to me in other ways. Sometimes I smoke when I'm driving a car, but there has to be a window at least part way open, even in freezing temps.

Another thing about smoking indoors--my work is in HVAC and the air filters from places where people smoke inside are downright nasty and scary. I don't think smoking should be allowed inside any public buildings unless there is a very good ventilation system, and only in those areas well ventilated.
post #40 of 46
The problem with smoking is that it not only affects you, but the smell and the crap in the air gets to others too.

If you want to kill yourselves on an expensive habit, be my guest, but I don't want to have to smell you doing it down wind.

I make my staff change shirts if they are going to smoke, and even then they stink.
post #41 of 46
i am a non smoker and all my family smoke, , bruce smokes, so im very used to the smell, sometimes i kinda like the smell after hes had one and other times its a bit horrid.
we have very strict smoking rules over here so its really nice to be in cafes/restaurants which are totally smoke free as you dont get that stale smell in the mornings , I have been quite lucky in the places i have worked in that often there are not a lot of chefs that smoke
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #42 of 46
When I smoke, I usually go outside. And if anybody asks, I say I'm going out back to smoke a salmon and well if they don't know me, they are thinking "wow nice".

But whose business is it if I'm smoking a salmon or a cigarette outside? If it's outside?

Salmon are a lot harder to light. But they last a lot longer.
post #43 of 46
:lol::lol::lol::lol: but im sure they are easier to smoke than a camel or a marlboro man :lol::lol::lol:
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #44 of 46
HAH Tessa, glad someone caught the joke :crazy: And you one-upped me lol :bounce:
post #45 of 46
I've been a smoker since I was 19, I'm now 32. I've been a heavy smoker in the past, especially when I smoked camels. I'm now at a point where I've limited myself to a couple of cigs a day, anywhere fom 1 to 5 depending on the circumstances. I consider myself a "nice smoker" meaning I go outside, I have breathmints on hand, I stand away from non smokers, and I won't smoke around anyone that is pregnant, too young, too old, too ill, or anyone that really hates it.

What bothers me to no end is how smokers are treated. Yes I realize we smokers might be stinky people with a few too many wrinkles that get crabby if we haven't had our nicotine hit, but that doesn't mean that non smokers are pleasant beautiful creatures that smell like lillies of the valley. I can't count the times I have been harrassed on the street that think it's ok to walk up to me and lecture me by saying things like "that stuff will kill you" or "this is MY AIR TOO!" or "could you stand a little further away please?" or refer to my cigarettes as cancer sticks.

It seems that the anti-smoking laws have empowered people to take on a better than thou attitude over smokers. Furthermore some non smokers now feel that they have a right to make all sorts of rude comments to us. I'm mostly angry that I take so much care not to be intrusive with my smoking but I am attacked anyway.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #46 of 46
That is fantastic, Mapiva! I've known people who wished they could at least cut back, but never managed to do it. You should be quite proud of yourself for that (and also for being a considerate smoker). :)
Vera
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Vera
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