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Help with a sauce pls!

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
We are hold ing a Congrats sit down dinner for girls 11-14 Thursday night and I need help with a sauce (gravy, I hate that word though) to go with my eye round roast. The menu is Roasted fingerling potatoes, grilled aspargus bundles and the eye round. This is buffet style with a sit down dining area. I need a sauce that is trendy but one which the girls can still appreciate. I would love any feedback as this feeding young girl thing is very very new to me. ;) Thank you!
Determination is going after Moby Dick in a row boat and bringing the tarter sauce!!!!......NICE!
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Determination is going after Moby Dick in a row boat and bringing the tarter sauce!!!!......NICE!
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post #2 of 20
A simple jus, shittake demi, mushroom bordelaise for a few suggestions. Maybe I am too old fashioned but IMO a "trendy" sauce is hard to serve/present in a buffet style service.

Also IMO eye of round tends to be kinda tough. Is there a certain way you are preparing it?
post #3 of 20
Roast it with mirepoix, deglaze the pan, add veal stock and puree the whole thing. That's good gravy man. :D
post #4 of 20
Eye of round included? Wouldn't that produce some sort of "milkshake/beef smoothie"? :crazy:
post #5 of 20
Hey you busting my chops?!?!? :D :D
post #6 of 20
Ay, thought eye of round was boneless? :confused:
post #7 of 20

Au Poivre

Au Poivre sauce.. doubt this is trendy but what a sauce! Holds well too. Be sure to cook as much of the booze off as possible as it's gonna feed youngens. It's fun to cook off booze anyway... keeps the eyebrows in check:suprise:
post #8 of 20
teenyboppa girls love chocolate so what about a chocolate mole kinda sauce, not too spicy or

but seriously a nice deep rich espagnole based sauce ,or a good tasty jus
girls can be kinda picky at that age, so stay away from spicy, mushrooms,garlic ,
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #9 of 20
Am I the only one seeing this? You have a bunch of young girls and you're serving beef? Do young girls even eat beef anymore? I'd put out a boat of a garlic rosemary sauce, some mustard, and some mayo. I don't see this as being a slam dunk event as far as the beef goes. I wouldn't worry too much about the sauce.
post #10 of 20
I like Kuan's basic idea, but want to suggest a few tweaks.

MADEIRA MUSHROOM SAUCE

For every beef round, use 2 cups of rough cut mirepoix. And add to it the stems of 1 pound of ordinary white (button) or brown (crimini) mushrooms. While the meat is roasting, cut the mushroom caps into thin slices.

After the roast is cooked, remove from the pan and drain off all but a little fat. Transfer the pan to the top of the stove, and over a medium flame push the vegetables to one side, and add 2 tbs of tomato paste in the empty space. Push the paste around with a spoon until it darkens and the raw is cooked off, then mix the vegetables in it.

Deglaze the pan with a cup of inexpensive Madeira (San Antonio Winery, for instance) or off-dry sherry like an Amontillado (Tesoro, for instance). This will give the "sauce" a hint of sophistication that should tickle the girls' nascent maturity, but these wines are neither winey nor boozey enough to taste objectionable to young palates.

When the pan is fully deglazed, allow the wine to reduce by about 20%.

If you don't have veal stock, you can use a good beef base like "Better than Bullion," but increase the concentration by about 25%. Use about 2 cups of stock to each cup of wine. Add the stock to the wine, bring to the boil, lower the heat to a fast simmer, and reduce by a quarter.

While the sauce is reducing, saute the sliced mushrooms in butter until browned in the following way: Heat the pan, and add a little oil, then off the flame melt the butter. Return the pan to the flame and add the mushrooms. Do not turn or stir until the mushrooms have browned (slightly) on one side. Then turn (or toss if possible) and saute until the mushrooms are just cooked. Reserve. Chop 1/2 cup of parsley. Reserve.

Puree the sauce, then pass it through a sieve after pureeing. The sauce MUST be sieved. Sieving gives gloss and texture.

The sauce should be barely nappe. If the sauce is not thick enough, thicken very slightly with a corn-starch slurry, and sieve again. Add a few splashes of Maggi if you have it. Add the mushrooms. Taste and adjust for salt and white pepper. Add as much parsley as you think appropriate immediately before service.

BDL
post #11 of 20
i know its not venison but why not a dark chocolate red wine sauce much like what is used for venison in chocolate...although deer can be a little "gamey" I don't think it would be bad at all...used on beef instead
and obviously instead of venison stock, use beef stock for the base.

I'd also do something different aside from asparagus..little kids and even adults can't stand it (i know i hate it)...but little kids are picky...I can't see that being a hit. Most kids love carrots or broccoli though...

good luck
post #12 of 20
You could also do a simple Cajun cream sauce. Girls love the buttery sauces. It can be real simple if you want. Reduce heavy cream with some Paul Prudhomme in it. To me it's rather trite but the people here love it. My last place did a blackened prime rib with it. I've been making that stuff since the 80's but people here are a little behind the times.
post #13 of 20
eye of round????? Gosh, isn't that so lean that it needs to be served rarish and sliced paper thin, doesn't sound like good buffet fare. Girls 11 to 14.....you might be better off doing a pizza and salad bar....or a taco bar; but if it is a lean roast make sure its rare and thin with a light beefy wine sauce,,,no mushrooms or onions,,,,My girls loved it all, but most kids don't.
Keep it simple and young girl friendly.
Boneless skinless chix breast cutlets pan seared and served with a simple sauce.... lightly thickened herb, wine, and stock base would be better, a white (brown basamati is good, most kids like it) rice pilaf and a simple blanched veg like broc with a light butter stock drizzle. Seasonal fruit lightly macerated, over ice cream, top with chocolate sauce and a butter spritz cookie (you can pipe them into lots of fun shapes) with sprinkles for dessert.
post #14 of 20
I am tired and brain dead sorry i see that it is a sit down....I really didnt give you any good advice for this thread...going to bed now...two 10 hour days in a row have left me less than attentive.
post #15 of 20
i think your suggestions were great, more kid freindly and very doable
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #16 of 20
am i correct to assume that this is being carved at the buffet table? i think two different sauces might work instead of trying to find the 'magic' one for the girls..they are such picky eaters at that age, at least in this country..ideas that pop in my head... a red chile gravy(kinda like a mole),bearnaise, madeira peppercorn, without the peppercorns or any of the brown sauces with fortified wines,a cabernet or bordelaise sauce...maybe also a horseradish-dijon-chive sauce..i think if its good, they'll eat it...or not!
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 20
I love the quote at the end of your thread!!!!!!!!
post #18 of 20
actually, after thinking about this more, whatever sauce you do, make it plain and simple..maybe even an au jus is all you need..at that age, girls want everything plain,aka boring, except when it comes to pizza, nachos and boys! i catered a father daughter dinner this winter and the majority of the girls just picked at their salads, ate a few veggies, a bite or two of salmon(without sauce), but had room for dessert(warm chocolate brownie with vanilla ice cream as i recall)...dads wolfed down the prime rib..so, in the end you may want to do a 'token' sauce for the grown ups and not fret about the girls..sorry to say, they probably won't eat it anyway!..i think i would have chosen a different entree for them, like some kind of pasta, lasagne or glorified mac and cheese..just my two cents!
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #19 of 20

Sauce

What about a creamy pink peppercorn sauce? I think young girls I always think pink.

This will stand well and would be simple, just make sure it's pink!

Another option would be a sundried tomato butter -- again, go for pink!
post #20 of 20
I know it's too late now, but I love to use a sweet component like a jelly along with a reduction of the pan drippings dissolved in some red wine. With beef or pork or wild game, I use red currant jelly, and with lamb I use a homemade mint/rosemary jelly. After reducing by at least 1/2, you end up with a very syrupy consistency, and some caramelized bits on the high edges of the pan. Scrape these into the sauce, and whisk a little butter in before serving.
Never trust a skinny cook
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Never trust a skinny cook
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