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what is yeast butter and powder egg white?????

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
this summer holidays i just want to try something new, when i flipping my cooking books i found some unique ingredients, one is for making madeleines, there's one ingredients that i never herd, is yeast butter, do anyone know what it use for and if there's no yeast butter what can use to substitute

the second is nougat , there's egg white powder , my question is , what it use for, what ingredients can be use as substitute

thx for all you help :chef:
post #2 of 14
Well, egg white powder is dried powdered egg whites.

I can see where it would be useful in some recipes. It allows you to get the effect of egg white without all the moisture. It allows you to use a low temperature process and still have a food-safe product compared to using fresh egg whites.

And you can get a more reliable measurement or half egg measurements using the powdered product. It's quite common in US grocery stores in the baking section, or sometimes the diet section. And certainly available on line.

No idea on the yeast butter. I'd guess at a yeast byproduct of some type.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 14

Gotta love Google

Yeast Butter

Sounds......lovely? :eek:
Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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post #4 of 14
I wonder if they mean Marmite/Vegemite as they're yeast products and a paste?

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 14
apart from the vegan version, i've used nutritional yeast mixed with melted butter and it's actually quite good on broccoli - really! it has the saltiness of an anchovy butter or something.
But it can't possibly be what is in madilenes (how is that spelt anyway?). I'm guessing someone's bad translation from french or something? possibly cake yeast, that is, fresh yeast? i didn;t think madelines had yeast, but i may be wrong. I never liked them so i never asked.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 14
Yeast butter:
As far as I know, there's no such thing as "yeast butter." Also, I've never heard of Madeleines being made with yeast in any form. The most I've seen of any leavening agent is baking powder -- then only a pinch; and only in the vast minority of recipes. The Madeleine came into being about the same time "haute cuisine" recipes were standardized, during the reign of Louis XV; consequently you don't see a lot of variation in Madeleine recipes in "normal" quantities.

While one should never be too surprised by recipe variation, I suspect a misprint, typo or misread more than any form of yeast. A pure speculation is the thought the writer specified a "cultured" butter. They're common in France but not that common in baking.

If you have the time, I'd appreciate if you could copy the entire the ingredient list for us and tell us the source and whatever language the recipe was printed in. I'm very interested.

Marmite/Vegemite in a Madeleine? Ummm, no. At least let's hope not.

Note to Siduri: Spelled, "Madeleine," and capitalized because named after a person.

Powdered Egg White:
Egg white (albumen) is an essential part of nougat. In fact, to my mind nougat is a meringue variant. Powdered egg white is a version of egg white often used by commercial bakers -- even very high quality bakers. Separating egg whites in commercial quantities can be problematic, not to mention failure to come together in peaks, and other aspects of egg-white unreliability. The best and only substitute is fresh egg whites, perverse though they are. Google "nougat + recipe + egg + white" and I'm sure you'll find plenty of recipes calling for egg white in both forms.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #7 of 14
savoury yeast /brewers yeast is very good for you and is really tasty but i think i would mix it with butter rather than margerine , its a great thing to boost vitamin b content and riboflavin in the diet if a person is a bit deficient in the vit b area, its easily digestable
marmite/vegemite is black and just delicious and definatly would make the madelines taste rather unusual :lol:

sometimes powdered egg white is known as meringue powder too
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #8 of 14
sounds like you are having the summer of egg foam!
you need a good egg foam to leaven you madelines and meringue for your nougat!
the yeast butter sounds kinda nasty, but then, i like oysters!

have fun and keep the weird and wacky questions coming!


PS, how did everything bake out?
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #9 of 14
Powdered egg whites are also a saving grace for making macarons and you need your whites to be drier than usual.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
thxs for everybody opinion heres the Madeleine recipe, they come from taiwan cook book also , why I intersted in this recipe because they not like usual Madeleine recipe in taiwan they call it generation Madeleine :
honey30 gr
water 20gr
cream 100gr
yeast butter180gr
eggs 300gr
sugar 280 gr
cake flour 250 gr
almond powder 30 gr
baking powder 5 gr
cornstarch 25 gr
salt 3 gr

1) mix honey and water in a small bowl
2) beat egg and sugar,salt until thick
3) melt yeast butter then add cream
4) mix all dry ingredients and then shieft
5) mix egg mixture with honey mixture mix well then add dry ingredients mix well
6) slowly add butter mixture mix well
7) bake for 17 min at upper 170c lower 150c


btw i just serch grom yahoo and google about yeast butter here 's what i found yeast butter is made from fermented butter , whisch is the best of natural fat , and send out a nice fragrance.

also can someone help me with good nougat recepies with out egg white powder thxs , what i looking for is soft and chewy nought thxs so much also hope u like the recipes above
post #11 of 14
"Fermented butter" is also called "cultured butter," and is widely used in Europe -- although not that much in baking. It's got a nutty, tangy taste and a mildly sour aroma somewhat like creme fraiche. You can make your own cultured butter by adding a little plain yogurt, cultured buttermilk, creme fraiche or sour cream (with a live culture) to regular cream -- about 1 tbs per cup of cream -- and letting it sit on the counter for two hours, than chilling overnight before churning. Don't clabber the cream with acid, and don't just let it sour by aging without a specific culture. You're looking for something with a similar taste but slightly less body than an English "clotted cream" -- if you know what that's like. Since you'll be baking with it, when you churn (presumably in a stand mixer), omit the salt.

Try this: How to Make Nougat - Photo Guide for Making Nougat - Homemade Nougat Recipes

BDL
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
in the recipes the yeast butter melted do i have to melted or heated if i make my own???? do still add cream???? is it the same if you mix butter with yeast?????

also thx for the comment also for the nougat recipes i will try it :):):)
post #13 of 14
Yes. You should do a google search on making butter -- or better yet on making cultured better. Then, make the butter.

Yes. Follow the recipe. After you've tried it, adjust to suit your preferences. Learning how to figure out how a recipe will work, and what variations you want to make before trying it is an important part of learning to cook. However, you don't seem to be at that level of expertise with Generation Madeleines yet. Better to stay close to the recipe -- the first time anyway.

Not if I understand what is meant by "fermented butter." The problem seems to be one more of language translation than of very exotic ingredients. First we have to figure out what the recipe originator meant, than supply the right ingredients. In this case, it appears (to me, anyway) that cultured butter is called for.

As a WORD (not as an ingredient or process), "cultured" became "fermented," and "fermented" became "yeast." In the case of "cultured" butter, the culturing agent is a lacto-bacterium (bacteria that affects milk) and not a yeast spoor. The bacteria and spoors are both eukaryotes (single-cell beasts), but are otherwise different. They won't change milk in the same ways. Furthermore, you don't want live yeast in a cake/cookie batter like a Madeleine. Without several rises and/or a great deal of working , the yeast would give the Madeleine's a very unpleasant taste; but if you did work the dough and/or allow for several fermentations you'd have entirely the wrong crumb. Even then, there are better ways to get fermented yeast into dough than by mixing it into butter, by way of a poolish or a sour starter to name two methods.

I think once you try cultured butter -- whether bought or DIY -- spread on a piece of toasted bread, the whole thing will become clear. It's got a nutty, tangy taste and is the kind of ingredient European and exotic enough to look very sexy to Asian bakers. It makes a lot of sense within the concept implied by the rest of the ingredient list and the name for Generation Madeleines.

It's possible I'm wrong and that "fermented butter" depends in some way on a yeast reaction. In case it's not obvious by now I'm giving an educated guess regarding the ingredients. I'm certainly not an expert on Generation Madeleines, and until this thread, never heard of "yeast butter." I've made regular Madeleines though, am familiar with the normal ingredients, have a good grasp of ingredients generally, and am familiar with the techniques involved. Take it for what it's worth -- a guess from a pretty good cook. Not the word of God handed down on stone tablets to the pastry class meeting Tu., and Th., 10am - 12am, Mt. Sinai kitchen.

If I'm wrong, it won't be the first time and I won't be embarassed,
BDL
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
thx for the info it's really helpfull:):):)
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