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What's the hardest dish to cook? - Page 3

post #61 of 68

Can you put a whole bunch down for the first blanch Ed?

post #62 of 68

Make sre when you second fry that they are ice cold

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #63 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefchadnyc View Post

Lauren - use a cake tester...or even a paper clip.

 

Stick it in the meat, pull it out, put it on your lip.  If it's warm, it's medium.  If it's cold, it's rare.  If it's hot, you're screwed.

 

Also good when you cook fish.  It will slide through with no resistance when it is just cooked through.  If it catches, it's still not cooked.

 

...We should start a thread - tricks from 4-star dining to no star diners.


That's right after my own heart.  Much better than a thermometer - You'd think that before the invention of the instant read thermometer, nobody could cook anything right!  and YES, please start this thread. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #64 of 68

uhm pasta salad

post #65 of 68
I made some beef wellington for the first time a week ago. I looked at several recipes to find what kind of techniques and prep it would require. I ended up creating a portabella and button mushroom duxxel with prosciutto wrapping around the beef tenderloin. The mushrooms were dried and minced well, the prosciutto was wrapped tightly around the duxxel and seared beef tenderloin. The searing was done quick on high heat and then touched up with mustard.

I cheated with the pastry, since I used boxed puff pastry. Touched up with egg yolk and decorated with my french knife. Touched up with some course sea salt, and baked at 450 f till golden brown. Only thing I regret was not drying the mushrooms into a near powder. That would have helped in preventing some of the beef tenderloin's moisture from getting into the bottom of the puff pastry.

Luckily, only one of the two beef wellington leaked moisture into the puff pastry. The other was nearly perfect, besides it was a hint cooked more than rare. Served my family for the holidays. I believe we served 14 total that night. We finished every piece, and it was regarded as everyone's best meal or close second. Took a lovely 7 hours to make the beef wellington and side dishes.

It tempts me to try fish n bread soup, a recipe I have heard can take much prep, and skill. I read a bit about the recipe at a library in one of the cooking reference books. It uses a saffron sauce to combine with a fish stock reduction. Other than that, I just remember it being the most difficult dish within the reference book.

Hope someone brings an interesting recipe for me to try out. For now, I am experimenting with some Italian-Japanese dishes, and am close to finalize a pasta, with seared and marinaded teriyaki Roma tomatoes and caramelized onions. I am trying to figure out a sauce to hold it together, but it almost works without one. I mean, a culinary instructor rather loved it without any sauce, but I feel it needs the after taste and texture of a light sauce. So far a sesame Alfredo kind of works, but it isn't what I am looking for.

Good luck to all of you. Hope you find a really intriguing recipe.
post #66 of 68

I've experience western and Asian cooking

 

Born in South East Asia, taking French cooking...

 

I can say...

 

Western

Bread. A simple Baguette is hard to master and yet to get the right size and taste

Fermentation, Shaping, Kneading, scoring, resting. 

Need tons of practice and hard to get a success one. But i believe experience and right recipe can get it right

and you might be suprise, asian dont like hard bread like typical country bread, ciabatta, sour bread etc.

They prefer bread which is like bread loaf soft or brioche, and all famous bread shop sell like hot cake is tyipica soft roll kinda base

 

Asian...

Something stir fried. you might think? Are you sure?

I have eatern few Chinese restaurant in Europe, they doesnt even taste nice...

They lack of something call "wok aroma" (direct translate from Cantonese) 镬气

The taste is crucial for stir fry noodles, fried rice and etc.

Hard part is stir fried at extreme heat and without getting the food burn

 

Another thing.

Dim sum, it is work of art and speed, getting right recipe for the skin layer is hard.

not only recipe is hard, wrapping skill for the siew mai and etc is freaking hard

 

French

Its hard when you want to get perfect shapes and size

using right ingredient to get the colour, taste and texture....

So far, hardest thing i ever think of french cuisine is French Pastry.... getting right temperature, (Pastry Cream 65C or egg white/yolk curdle)

Right folding methods, and etc....

Croissant, this is insanely hard for country like us, we need 16C air con room or else sure split and fail

 

And with multicultural here, i can perceive is hard....

where i dont have much experience at it...

Tweaking Indian spice and incorporate nicely into a recipe

Curry here have many kind... A fish curry and mutton curry use different curry powder.

Fish curry need sourness and mutton curry need real spiciness.

I've been to Indian morning market, only chilli they have> 12 kinds of chilli ,all taste different, come in different colour ....

You have heard about Garam Masala, You simply mix spices and you can call it garam masala.. cause it is not fix. When you see recipe in youtube stating garam masala, make sure u ask the chef what kind of spice inside the garam masala


Edited by FB User (Private) - 1/6/15 at 1:31am
post #67 of 68
Speaking of dim sum, that is one dish I have never cracked
. Those steamed turnip / Daikon cakes. I adore the texture but have never nailed it myself. Maybe 2015....
post #68 of 68
What a great thread! I'm glad this popped back up. But the answer must be pasta salad... i can't remember the last time I had a good one! wink.gif
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