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Stock vs Broth - Page 2

post #31 of 37

Broth is for the customer and stock is for me.  Broth is finished  with appropriate seasoning etc and served to guest. Stock is strained out of pot of bones and  mirepoix and herbs. and stored or used for something else. Thats my definition for what it's worth.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #32 of 37

I'm in the stock is made from bones, broth is made from mostly meat camp.

 

With stock, I think, you actually DON'T want a strong flavor. Thats why veal is the most highly prized for making a rich, gelatinous stock. It's fairly neutral, and when you go to make a sauce later it won't interfere with the other things you want in the sauce, but still give you the gelatin you want for body and mouthfeel. But bones, in general, don't have a lot of flavor to just themselves.

 

IMO, broth's are generally meant to be served "as is" and should be pretty intensely flavored. Usually they are made from meat (or a mixture of meat and bones, like a chicken carcass) and often the meat is served with the broth, like in chicken soup or chicken pot pie. 

 

This doesn't mean that, say, a stock can't make a good base for a soup, but it will most likely need to be fortified with vegetables and meat.

 

But again, I would say, stock has more neutral flavor and much more body, where a broth has much more flavor but less body. 

post #33 of 37

I know someone already mentioned bones and their wonderful contributions, but I tend to say "Broth" when I"m making potages. Often, with no "stock" but a vegetable simmered in water and then served as is or pureed.

post #34 of 37

I'm taking culinary classes and one textbook is "On Cooking: A Textbook of Culinary Fundamentals". It says "The techniques for making stocks discussed in Chapter 10 are identical to those used for making broths. Like stocks, broths are prepared by simmering flavoring ingredients in a liquid for a long time. Broths and stocks differ, however, in two ways. First, broths are made with meat instead of just bones. Second, broths (often with a garnish) can be served as finished dishes, whereas stocks are generally used to prepare other items."

post #35 of 37

We also use the On Cooking textbook in the restaurant/food lab at my school. I was also taught that the difference between a stock and a broth was that a stock had clean rinsed bones while a broth was bones, fat, meat, etc. Another big difference between the two was that a good stock was crystal clear. You'd have to constantly skim the scum and fat off the stock and make sure it NEVER reached a boil or else it would cloud and you'd have to throw it out or clarify it (lessening quality). Broth is way more forgiving but tends to have a lighter mouthfeel and less flavour. A good stock is like a punch in your face.

post #36 of 37

A stock, if you run definitions in the dictionary, is something that is ready to be converted at a moment's notice.

 

Like all the other professionals,  my definition is  a stock is any liquid that is mildly seasoned and with very little or no salt, but with great depth of flavour..  Like this, it can be reduced heavily for a sauce or glaze without being overly salty, or can be used as is  for soups with salt added.

 

A broth is anything that the customer eats--it is seasoned properly.  As such it can not be reduced for  sauces or glazes without becoming overly salty.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #37 of 37

Please indulge me as I fabricate whole cloth a history of the invention of stock and broth...

 

Once upon a time, Suzy Homemaker was making some soup for her family. She began to notice that she was throwing away the ends of her vegetables and realized that she was tossing away flavor and felt very bad about it because she realized that there were starving children in Africa. She decided to help the poor dears by collecting the ends, simmering them in a pot, tossing the solid matter and employing the liquid in various ways in her meals.

 

Later he husband Bruno noticed that she was throwing away lots of bones and suggested that she do the same with the carcasses. These took longer to cook but also yielded wonderful flavor and nutrition. Another win.

 

Their guests raved about how rich and delicious their meals were and asked the secret. They went home and made stocks/broths using perfectly good veggies and even expensive cuts of meats, which were costly and wasteful - the complete opposite of Suzy and Bruno Homemaker's original intention! But it did taste good.

 

Eventually a large multi-national corporation named "Let's Monetize, Inc" decided to turn both into products. They called them "stock" or "broth" as need to create and market a product to sell to people who were willing to pay to not have to think or act creatively or to tend a simmering pot. Stock and broth became stuff in a box you buy.

 

*********************

 

I'm of the opinion that if you regularly do as Suzy and Bruno did you will have great stuff to add to your meals that is economical, resourceful, delicious, healthy, etc. without buying products that have been "hacked" by heartless, soulless corporations that will constantly compromise the quality and healthfulness of what they sell you (food coloring, preservatives, etc.) using only stuff that you would have otherwise thrown away.

 

And rather than cooking a stock from perfectly good veggies to add to your soup, just add the veggies to your soup! And instead of adding "beef broth" to your soup, drop in a bone or "hock", or maybe a turkey leg or something.

 

Think: "What would Suzy and Bruno do?"

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