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A New Stock Pot Concept

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Saw this a few days ago - seems like a very good idea. Comments?

shel
post #2 of 12
Sounds pretty gimmicky. I don't see it really adding anything that well clad/disk pans don't already do.

And what's the lifespan of the oil before it gums up and stops working? Even worse, this would be a true potential problem for the disks to warp and displace.

I'd like to see some independent reviews and serious stress testing of the product.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 12
I don't really see much point of that kind of evenness in any pan; but for a stock pot, it just seems ridiculous. An expensive, complicated solution to a non-existent problem. How often does stock cook unevenly?

BDL
post #4 of 12
I've had trouble with my kitchen floor, the stove tilts a bit to the side. As a result, all my soups end up cooked more on the left than the right. I should get a couple of these pots for sure!

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
I've had pieces of ingredients stick to the bottom of some stock pots, and there have been times when cleanup has been an issue. One of my pots got ruined from food sticking - poor heat regulation from the stove even though heatwas turned down as low as possible.

The oil inside the bottom of these pans shouldn't leak or get gummy as Phil suggests, although I am basing the comment on other oil-filled products I have used over the course of many years - they are still going strong. And I'm satisfied with the even way they distribute heat.

BDL asked how often stock cooks unevenly. I don't know, however, the description of the poit says it's ideal for sauces and chowder, which, by my definition, is not the same as a stock. The question I'd ask is how often does sauce or chowder cook unevenly or stick to the bottom of the pot?

Myfeeling is that this design has some value and can be useful in certain situations, and, if I were in the market for a new pot, it would be worth considering based solely on my experience with oil-filled products as noted above.

shel
post #6 of 12
Lately I have been wondering if a slab of unglazed ceramic ( a pizza stone or some such ) could be used as a thermal buffer between the flame and the pot for more delicate dishes. It would work with all your current pots, no need to buy fancy, oil filled new ones.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 12
That's what flame tamers are for.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 12
Professionally speaking if you try using a baking stone or some from of ceramic disc that is not intended for direct contact with a flame you are asking for some serious issues. Before experimenting with such things please research the idea properly.

If the item is too delicate for direct flame try using the double boiler method. Other than that it would seem to me that if your having issues with food sticking to the bottom of the pan the flame is too high and/or you're not paying adequate enough attention to the work. If you can't give adequate attention then use your oven. you can simmer something for a greater amount of time in there considering it's basic nature is indirect heat.

As far as this quote unquote new pot is concerned it sounds more like a crock.
post #9 of 12
Wish I'd said that.

BDL
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm really glad you didn't ... <LOL>

It seems as though I'm in the minority here about this pot ... oh well, one of these days you'll all realize how wrong you are <LOL>

scb
post #11 of 12
Teamfat, if you do a search under "heat diffusers" you'll find several solutions to your problem.

Heat diffusers (I assume that's what Phil means by flame tamers) come in a variety of materials---none of which are ceramic, btw---and are designed for use when direct flames can be a problem. This might be because of the food you are cooking, or the vessel you are cooking it in.

Glazed tagines, for instance, should not be used over direct flames. So if you use one on a stovetop, a diffuser is recommended.

Heat diffusers are cheap, readily available, and do not have the problems you'd encounter trying to use ceramic as a shield.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 12
KY,

It's only because you're so young and good looking that you don't recognize the name "Flame Tamer." It was a little heat diffuser, stuffed with asbestos, it cost nearly nothing and worked like gang-busters. If you were only old enough to remember when a Chemex coffee pot sat on every stove, you'd remember a Flame Famer beneath them on the glass stoves (and a little copper ring on the electrics).

Guys as old as Old and me think of Flame Tamer as the generic for diffuser.

Asbestos. Who knew? Well actually the people who were selling it to us knew. But that's a different story.

Anyway, I think Kuhn Rikon owns the rights to the name and make a good diffuse under it. Not cheap though. 2 matches for: flame tamer

BDL
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