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difference between stock, broth and consomme??? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
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Originally Posted by SpoiledBroth View Post
 
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Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

And one more thing.  One does not "BOIL" liquid with meat for a stock, broth, or even consomme.  Do that, and I'll tell you nasty things about your mother while you are mucking out my greasetrap.  You simmer liquids with meat/bones.  If you boil for longer periods of time, you churn in any protein from the meat/bones into the stock, making it cloudy, and also churn in any fat into the liquid, making it greasy and milky.r    
this is only really true of western stocks, my understanding is that asian stockmaking is predicated on emulsifying fat in the stock (hard boil).

Not all of them. These tend to be for Ramen, or particular tonic soups. They also do western style stock for many things, and a particluar general purpose has a sort of double stock usually translated high stock or master stock (though master stock is also some times used for red cooking broths that have been used heavily). Much of Chinese food theory has to do with keeping you healthy according to a long and intricate folklore and thus the tonic stocks and soups. And it's even reasonably balanced by Western nutrition standards. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #32 of 40
Thanks Phatch, you beat me to it
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoiledBroth View Post


this is only really true of western stocks, my understanding is that asian stockmaking is predicated on emulsifying fat in the stock (hard boil).


could you give some examples . I am very fond of the chinese stock used for good wonton soup , I had in china town in London . 

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Not all of them. These tend to be for Ramen, or particular tonic soups. They also do western style stock for many things, and a particluar general purpose has a sort of double stock usually translated high stock or master stock (though master stock is also some times used for red cooking broths that have been used heavily). Much of Chinese food theory has to do with keeping you healthy according to a long and intricate folklore and thus the tonic stocks and soups. And it's even reasonably balanced by Western nutrition standards. 


Yes I am interested in learning more about making more of my chicken broths like theres .theres are clear light  and refined .   

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Not all of them. These tend to be for Ramen, or particular tonic soups. They also do western style stock for many things, and a particluar general purpose has a sort of double stock usually translated high stock or master stock (though master stock is also some times used for red cooking broths that have been used heavily). Much of Chinese food theory has to do with keeping you healthy according to a long and intricate folklore and thus the tonic stocks and soups. And it's even reasonably balanced by Western nutrition standards. 
Are you implying fat is inherently unhealthy...?
post #36 of 40

I think Phatch is referring to the idea of tonic soups, not fats, being balanced.  But I'll let Phatch clarify this.

 

However, if you have a Chinatown in your city or a traditional Chinese drugstore, I urge you to pop in for a visit and peek, it's a blast.  Gureanteed they'll have an old display case full of pyrex baking dishes crammed full of dried roots, herbs, sea creatures, and who-knows-what-else.  A customer walks in with a complaint, the druggist sits him, takes his pulse, asks a few questions, and makes a diagnosis.  Then he makes up the medicine.  Say you have kidney stones, he'll lay out five sheets of cardboard on the counter, and with a sliding beam scale, will scale out the various items.  Many times the herbs have to be stewed with a chicken, or in some cases with pork. One package of herbs per chicken, and yes, you et the chicken too.  Sometimes it's just the herbs brewed straight up, but most of the time it's with a chicken or pork. paessk

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

I think Phatch is referring to the idea of tonic soups, not fats, being balanced.  But I'll let Phatch clarify this.

 

However, if you have a Chinatown in your city or a traditional Chinese drugstore, I urge you to pop in for a visit and peek, it's a blast.  Gureanteed they'll have an old display case full of pyrex baking dishes crammed full of dried roots, herbs, sea creatures, and who-knows-what-else.  A customer walks in with a complaint, the druggist sits him, takes his pulse, asks a few questions, and makes a diagnosis.  Then he makes up the medicine.  Say you have kidney stones, he'll lay out five sheets of cardboard on the counter, and with a sliding beam scale, will scale out the various items.  Many times the herbs have to be stewed with a chicken, or in some cases with pork. One package of herbs per chicken, and yes, you et the chicken too.  Sometimes it's just the herbs brewed straight up, but most of the time it's with a chicken or pork. paessk

 

Vile stuff.  You better get better or grandma will make you drink more of that stuff.

post #38 of 40

No, not that fat is inherently unhealthy. Just that Asia has more ideas about stock than just western or emulsified, but includes both.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #39 of 40

I don't think there is any "corect"  answer to the question, at least one that satisfies all cooks in all cultures and enviroments.  

My general feeling is for stock, simmer meat bones and strain.  For consomme, clarify the stock and strain.  For broth add flavorings or vegetables to the stock and strain.  If it's just an ingredient in a more elaborate dish, canned will do.  If making a soup or stew, make it from scratch.

post #40 of 40

All this talk of tonic broth and herbalists, well:

 

I dveloped chronic fatigue syndrome, or something much like it, before it even had the name.  After about 4 years of horrible suffering I met a Chinese herbalist who did the pulse thing and then gave me the "perscription" for 2 potions.  I brought them to the kind of guy foodpump described, but I had to pick them up a week later because one of the ingredients was rare and had to come from a supplier in NY.

 

Well both had to be boiled for about an hour, both smelled foul, one worse than the other it smelled like a badly over-ripened sweaty horse and I would guess horse s..t wouldn't have tasted worse.  I had to do this twice-daily on a tight schedule for 2 weeks.  But the gist is I felt like a new man at the end of it.  Funny thing also, I discovered I could have accomplished all that and more with just a temporary change in diet.

 

Like Hippocrates said, "Let food be thy medicine."

 

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 10/26/15 at 6:38pm
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