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white fish

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
What kind of white fish has the best balance of natural fish flavor without being fishy? I always try to remember what type of white fish i like but always forget. i thnk orange roughy, cod, and halibut are the ones i like...anyone have suggestions?

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post #2 of 16
ah,, we need to buy more fish . . . <g>

try remembering the oily strong tasting fishies - bluefish, mackerel, (add....)

the "other white" fishies:
orange roughy
red snapper
trout - brown, speckled, rainbow
sea bass / striper / rockfish
flounder
catfish
tilapia
cod
halibut
ocean perch
shad
swordfish... ? pseudo white?

each has its own flavor and "advantages" such as firmness, flake size, etc.
post #3 of 16
Cod would be fairly mild and is a favorite of mine. For freshwater fish catfish is good as far as whats easily available in stores, I have access to walleye all summer so I don't buy much fish :lol:
post #4 of 16
The most favourite white fish in Scotland is haddock. It figures largely in our fish n chip shops. However, stocks are diminishing all the time.

I also like cod, halibut and monkfish. Monkfish is a more 'meaty' fish.
post #5 of 16

A fish story the FDA

Since we have all been talking fish lately, let me tell you whats been happening in Florida.In June at least 10 fisherman were sickened by ciguatera which is a food poisening caused by ciguatoxin that accumulates in reef feeding fish.Less then 100th of a gram can can cause this. It accounts for 50,000 people a year worldwide who are made sick.Within hours it causes nausea, vomiting.diarrhea, stomach pain and the reversal of hot and cold sensation in the body. Death could occur within two hours of ingestion through respiratory paralsis depending on your overall health. IT CANNOT BE KILLED BY COOKING. The fisherman ate yellow fin grouper,black grouper. Some were found in a Whole Food Market here.AVOID barracuda, hogfish ,amberjack,snapper and fish that weigh over 5 pounds. The chief exporters of fish to us are China, Thailand and Canada. The bad fish seems to be coming from the Bahamas.and some spots in the gulf. My biggest bone of contention is again the FDA and their budget cuts. In 2007 868000 entrees of imported seafood of which 14,000 were were subject to inspection, thats less then 2 percent. This is not acceptable.We Americans consume about 16.3 pounds of seafood a year up 2 pounds since 1997.
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
thanx everyone...and i mean don't get me wrong..i love a good mackerel and other "fishy" fishes but sometimes you just need that mild fish flavor..but thanx for the list..there were definitely some on there that i havent thought of for while! :roll:
post #7 of 16
Thanks Ed Buchanan I live in florida and do lots of fishing but haven't in a while.so i guess my fish pole will just collect a little more dust.
post #8 of 16
Personally I wouldn't consider catfish as a mild white fish, I find it to be somewhat strong and muddy tasting. I love it, my wife doesn't. Hmmm, I'll be on my own for dinner thursday night...

Speaking of fish, what are the differences between smelt and fresh, so to speak, sardines?

mjb.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #9 of 16
...muddy tasting

the farm raised catfish seems to avoid the mud flavor, but I know what you mean....

I don't think smelts and sardines are the same fish except perhaps in "local terminology" - growing up around the water we had 'inaccurate' names for a lot of critters.
post #10 of 16
I find that a lot of not-so-good freshwater fish has this muddy flavour. Having had lots of steamed fish as a child I've ran into my share of muddy tasting ones that no amount of soy sauce can hide. On that note I think tilapia's the worst culprit of all. I fins that flatfishes (like dover sole) are great mild white fishes with an excellent flavour and texture.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #11 of 16
My vote would have to go to Sturgeon. I prefer it to Halibut due to the tendency for Halibut to dry out quickly, and a strong flavor depending on the fish. I have never had a bad piece of Sturgeon, probably due to the fresh supply we have in the Columbia River where I live.


On a side note, I wouldn't consider any of the trout listed above as a "white" fish. If they are white it is due to being farm raised. A wild trout will be pink fleshed similar to a Salmon (not nearly as dark), and have the same texture and oil content as a Salmon. I find the farm raised fish to taste "muddy" and have a mushy texture.
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post #12 of 16
Speaking of trout, something I have not seen lately in the markets is steelhead, which looks like salmon but is really an ocean-going trout, as I recall. I used to enjoy it, it sort of tasted like salmon but was different.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #13 of 16
........steelhead...

they are a good fish! we had some about 2 months ago. the once and only once steelhead has appeared in our market in six years!
post #14 of 16
While I've caught my share of them, I've never seen steelhead in the market.

My impression is that the ones being sold are farmed fish, not wild. But I don't know that for sure.

Years back, there was an incidental steelhead catch by Native Americans in Lake Michigan. Steelhead were not a legal commercial catch any other way, and to market them they were called "white salmon."

You are correct, Teamfat. A steelhead is a sea-run rainbow trout. Basically, a trout that acts like a salmon. Unlike Pacific salmon, however, steelhead can perform that fresh-to-salt-to-fresh water trick innumerable times.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #15 of 16
..they were called "white salmon."

odd - steelhead flesh is as red as sockeye

must be a limited legal catch somewhere - ours were adverted as "wild caught"

I've seen references that steelhead and rainbow are one and the same fish - wonder if that's supported by DNA or "observation"....
post #16 of 16
Steelhead are anadramous Rainbow Trout. The Steelhead you see in the market in more than likely farm raised, but there are a few times a year when incidental catch provides some wild fish for the stores.

The problem with this in most areas, is that there are multiple runs of fish moving through the rivers when the commercial and tribal fishermen have their nets in the water, and some of those runs are listed as endangered or threatened. There is quite a movement on in the Pacific Northwest to ban all nets in the rivers due to this, and any support of the net fishermen hurts the cause. Investigate the fish you are buying to make sure it comes from areas that are not currently working to keep the runs in their rivers healthy.
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