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Tzatziki

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I made chicken gyros last night using the recipe from Joy of Cooking for my tzatziki.

Got me to thinking, are there better versions of this out there? Seems to me that this was the first legit gyro I have had that didnt just use sour cream, like the vendors in my area seem to serve it with.


Also, what else can I eat with this stuff? I made too much last night and now I don't know what I'm gonna do with it.


...... And can anyone tell me how to pronounce tzatziki?

Here's what the recipe called for:

1 cup plain yogurt
1/2 cucumber, peeled seeded and diced
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 Tbsp dry dill
1 Tbsp fresh finely chopped mint
1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp lemon juice
post #2 of 9
Try using Greek yogurt, or straining regular yogurt. Also, a sheep or goat's milkyogurt may be considered more "authentic" and it will definitely add a litte something extra to the tzatziki.

Fresh dill would be nice, and try a little more mint. Look for a mild Greek olive oil ....

scb
post #3 of 9
Looks like a good recipe to me.
I've never used sour cream, too heavy.

I believe it's pronounced: suh-zee-kee
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Are there other things the tzatziki will go good with besides gyros?
post #5 of 9
It's good on lots of grilled meats. Also good as dip and eating as relish of sorts with other meats. I often have some tzatziki along with hummus, pita bread, good olive oil and zartar.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Oh cool, I was going to make some hummus later this week. I shall try the two together
post #7 of 9
After you've grated the cucumber - its best to squeeze out the excess water thru a clean towel. It can be too watery if you don't. Go with the Greek yoghurt. I sometimes like to add a little finely diced dill cucumber (gherkin/cornishon) as well. And I add some pepper to the mix.

It goes well as a dip for crudite, sliced raw vegetables.

I love the stuff :)
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 9
It's very like the Raita (riata) served with Indian food. Made very much like u suggest, with the addition of Whole cumin seeds, dry roasted, thenground and sprinkled liberally over the top.
As DCsunshine suggests, Getting rid of excess water from the cucumber is a good thing. A dusting of salt. Leave for an hour. Rinse then squeeze well.
However ur saying it is probarbly right
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #9 of 9
I use strained yogurt, shredded and squeezed dry-ish cukes, dill and some Greek Oregano (a different plant from "regular" oregano). Sometimes I'll also sneak a little roasted garlic in there as a change even though it's not "authentic".

ETA: oops! And a little fresh lemon if the yogurt isn't tart enough.
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