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Squirrel

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Does anybody have any squirrel recipes? Yes I’m serious and no I don’t plan on eating it.
post #2 of 19
When I was a kid, my granddaddy used to shoot squirrels sometimes. Grandmama would fry them just like chicken, and cover them with gravy. We loved them!
post #3 of 19
I believe you can literally prepare squirrel as you would chicken in any recipe.

Also I believe the original Burgoo recipe called for squirrel and other small game type animals.
post #4 of 19
Squirrels were a staple of the frontier diet It was a proud boast of the Kentuckey Riflemen that they always shot the squirrel in the eye, so as not to mess up the meat. The British Redcoats found out what they were talking about.

It's been a long time since I nailed a squirrel, but my aunt fried up a couple of my long-ago bag (I had to clean 'em), and she made a thick pan gravy, and they were really fine.

It's a cliche to say they tasted like chicken, and as I remember they didn't, very much. They were a little more gamey. They were, after all, finished on nuts. It works for Smithfield hams.

Mike
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post #5 of 19
When I was a kid, our sitter and her husband stayed with us while our parents were out of town. One night he brought in some squirrel. His wife soaked it in milk, breaded them, pan-fried them and we ate them up!

Good thing Mom had given up keeping the kitchen kosher..... :eek:
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post #6 of 19
I've got dozens of recipes, Isbnso. Squirrel is one of my favorite game meats. But I'm confused. If you're not going to eat it, why should I bother typing them out. More info, please.

>It was a proud boast of the Kentuckey Riflemen that they always shot the squirrel in the eye,......<

Actually, Mike, Kentucky sharpshooters always claimed to have barked their squirrels. That is, they shot a filet of bark out from under the rodent, so it was killed in the fall. No meat was wasted that way.

Now then, if you don't believe that tale, I can take you to an exact spot where one of them bit the dust after being barked and show it to you. :lol:

Barking aside, most gunners in the Middle Ground body shot squirrels because squirrel head stew was a much loved delicacy. It fell into disfavor a few years back, due to a disease that affected squirrel brains. But in rural Kentucky it's still considered a great treat.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 19
Mezz' said

"Good thing Mom had given up keeping the kitchen kosher....."

What, squirrels got cloven hoofs? :eek:

I'm pretty sure they don't qualify as shellfish...

Mike
travelling gourmand
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post #8 of 19
But they were soaked in milk. Milk & meat together = not kosher.
post #9 of 19
ON EDIT: I have no idea of why I answered typing as Elmer Fudd. The misapprehension deserves an answer. Split ("cloven") hooves aren't forbidden, they're actually required. For a land animal (beast of the field) to be kosher it must be a ruminant (cud chewer) with split hooves. Cows, deer, sheep, yes. Camels chew cud but no hooves, no. Pigs split hooves but no cud, no. Rodents, including squirrel, neither -- definitely no.

Heheheheh.
BDL
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
In a nutshell: research.
A few questions for you KY: Do tomatoes compliment squirrel meat? Could I develop a chicken recipe using tomatoes and have it be one that squirrel could be substituted for the chicken and it still be a good squirrel recipe? And why are the rascally rodents chewing up my tomato vines? Not the fruit, the vines.
post #11 of 19
Any chicken recipe will work for squirrel. Tomato goes well and seems to tame the gamy flavor some. Stews are good using beef stock too.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
How many squirrels would it take to make up for one chicken, rough estimate?
post #13 of 19
Probably three to four squirrels
post #14 of 19
As all of you can see, my grounding in kosher rules is pretty weak.

What would you expect from a Lutheran? :D

Mike
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post #15 of 19
Pastrami on white, with mayo, lettuce and tomato.

BDL
post #16 of 19
I'm gonna think that over a while, crafting a suitably insulting response. Too late, tonight; too much wine with dinner. :roll:

Mike :D
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post #17 of 19
First off, let me state that I disagree with all the people who talk about squirrel substituting for chicken. While many recipes are interchangeable, squirrel has a totally different flavor. The are only two game meats I know of that truly substitute, one-to-one, for chicken: Rabbit and rattlesnake.

So, you could, for instance, do a squirrel fricassee, which would be delicious. But it would not taste like the same dish done with a chicken.

That said, let me take your questions in order:

1. I don't think that squirrel and tomatoes particularly compliment each other. Only three of my many recipes for preparing flagtails use tomatoes, and each of them is some form of stew. I've a Brusnwick Stew version, a jambalya, and a hunter's stew. That's it on squirrels mixed with tomatoes.
Shooting from the hip, I can see where squirrel and fried green tomatoes might pair nicely. But I haven't tried it, so can't say for sure. For instance, you might strip cook meat from the bones. Combine it in a brown sauce of some kind, and serve that over the fried green tomatoes.

2. #squirrels:chicken. Depends a lot on sizes, of course. But as a rule of thumb I'd say two-three Fox squirrels or three-four mature Grays.

3. Why are they eating your tomato vines? I dunno! And you can quote me on that.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #18 of 19
First off, let me state that I disagree with all the people who talk about squirrel substituting for chicken. While many recipes are interchangeable, squirrel has a totally different flavor. The are only two game meats I know of that truly substitute, one-to-one, for chicken: Rabbit and rattlesnake.

So, you could, for instance, do a squirrel fricassee, which would be delicious. But it would not taste like the same dish done with a chicken.

That said, let me take your questions in order:

1. I don't think that squirrel and tomatoes particularly compliment each other. Only three of my many recipes for preparing flagtails use tomatoes, and each of them is some form of stew. I've a Brusnwick Stew version, a jambalya, and a hunter's stew. That's it on squirrels mixed with tomatoes.
Shooting from the hip, I can see where squirrel and fried green tomatoes might pair nicely. But I haven't tried it, so can't say for sure. For instance, you might strip cook meat from the bones. Combine it in a brown sauce of some kind, and serve that over the fried green tomatoes.

2. #squirrels:chicken. Depends a lot on sizes, of course. But as a rule of thumb I'd say two-three Fox squirrels or three-four mature Grays.

3. Why are they eating your tomato vines? I dunno! And you can quote me on that.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 19
Fricassee is real popular in georgia....also just plain old bbq.....don't forget
about the nuts in the stomach.....if the stomach is real full....you just open the stomach and spread them on a pan....toasting them until dry....great on top of a chocolate cake......real distinctive flavor.....
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