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Your Favorite Cheese - Page 3

post #61 of 88
One store I frequent had some Humboldt Fog on hand, I got a small wedge, first time I've tried it.

That is GOOD stuff.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #62 of 88
Speaking of goat cheese, yesterday, for the second time, I purchased

Arina Goat Gouda
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl....DTL&type=wine

It's absolutely wonderful of you like goat cheese and gouda. Definitely worth a try. I love it!

shel
post #63 of 88
Shel said-

"Let us know what you think of it ..."

Well, the Roaring Forties blue cheese is creamy and quite nice. Not having a very discriminating palate, though, I prefer Maytag, at about 1/2 the price, or even Danish blue, at about 1/3 the price, both for their sharper taste.

Maybe I'm just cheap. :confused:

Not at all to knock Roaring Forties; I think it's just that my ageing taste buds require more stimulation. :mad:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #64 of 88

Morbier [More beer?]

Finally found the cheese I was thinking of with the layer of ash in the middle - Morbier. Quite a pungent aroma, you most likely wouldn't want this one on a cheese board at a wine tasting. It isn't as sharp as you might guess from the aroma, but it is good, a reasonably rich creaminess. Well, I like it, my wife would probably don rubber gloves and use a long pair of tongs to haul it out to the garbage can, holding her breath on the way.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #65 of 88

Gromit says a nice bit of

Wensleydale makes "Wallace's face look nice and toothy."

BDL
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #66 of 88
I believe their new favourite cheese is Stinking Bishop. One cannot fault their taste!
post #67 of 88
I'm laughing at Old.:lol: I was in the local VFW one night when someone came around with a plate of limburger. I'd heard stories about it all my life (the primary recommended use being to place a piece on the manifold of someone's car that you don't like. We now use deer scent for that purpose) but had never tasted it. Figured this was my big chance without actually wasting any money on the experience. My friends were yelling "NO! DON'T" but of course I didn't listen. I thought I would die. It tasted like thoroughly rotten shrimp smells. The guy who was passing it around said "Well, it is better if you put a couple of thin slices of onion on either side." I'm wondering why they don't just buy some decent cheese to start with. I'm told German brick is even worse, but I will accept that conclusion without risking my life finding out for myself. Just give me some muenster or camembert please.
post #68 of 88
Have you had an opportunity to try Etorki? It's made with sheep's milk and comes from Europe. It's somewhere between a soft and a semi soft cheese. It's not well known or readily available around here. They have it at the cheese stall at the market in Toronto which I rarely get a chance to get to but it is unbelievable.
No rind or mold or flavouring of any kind. It does have a distinctive "depth" to it's taste but so rich and smooth.
If you ever have a chance to try it you won't be sorry.

doodle
Life is too short to eat bad food!
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Life is too short to eat bad food!
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post #69 of 88
It's from the Basque country, and comes from a specific type of ewe - forget their name, but they have black heads. My memory is that the cheese has a thin, orange-brown rind that most people find edible. It's been several years since I've tried it, however, my failing memory says it was pretty good with a mild flavor. I wish I could remember more. I'll see if my cheese purveyor carries it.

shel
post #70 of 88
St. Andre, Pt. Reyes Blue, or Humbolt Fog; Depending on the mood or the day...
post #71 of 88
Sooooo funny, we used to serve softly melted morbier on a crostini drizzled with LULU truffle honey as an appetizer 10 years ago.....or the same goo on a baby green salad with haricot verte dressed in Dom champagne vinagrette.
People actually paid a pretty penny for that stinky cheese.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #72 of 88
There is a raw milk version and a pasteurized version, the latter being less pungent.

My favorite is "Fleur du Maquis".
post #73 of 88

Podda Classico

A few days ago one of the cheese purveyors I frequent offered up a taste of Podda Classico. The simplest - and oversimplified - description of the cheese is that it falls somewhere between a Parmigiano Reggiano and an older Pecorino Romano. But it's really more than that.

It's produced on the Italian island of Sardinia (Sardegna), and is made from a blend of pasteurized cow's and sheep's milk, and is aged for between 6 and 11 months. The cheese has a nice golden yellow color, is a bit crumbly (like an older Reggiano or Pecorino Romano) and has a nutty, somewhat sweetish taste. There is a younger Podda Rigato, which is a "sister" cheese to the Classico. I've not tried that one.

The Classico is a good choice wherever Pecorino Romano and Reggiano can be used. I've used it in a couple of spaghetti dishes with very good results. It's nice to break off a piece for a nibble as well.

A little more information is here:
Italian Gourmet Food at Salumeria Italiana - Podda Classico

My piece came from AG Ferrari which has a few stores in the SF Bay Area.
post #74 of 88
I received a cheese order from my purveyor this week. I bought some Pave Sauvage (goat), Valencay Cendre pyramids (goat), Banon de Chalais (cow milk) Brillat Savarin, Pont Le Eveque, Explorateur, Edel De Cleron , Brie De Meaux, Epoisses, Chaumes, St. Agur and Tomme De Savoie. Yummy! I use them in my cheese offerings. St Agur topped with raw local honey is my new favorite cheese course.
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #75 of 88
wow....dems good cheeses.....are you using honey comb on your cheese plates? I've had it, but not bought it for that use yet. Maybe at this Wed's farmer's market.


This past weekend I participated (12th year) in the Chef's Wine Country BBQ aka James Beard Picnic.....totally bastardized some Goatsbeard blue by mixing it 1part blue to 3 parts mascarpone....piping into a fillo shell then topping with 1) local fig jam and MO tiny toasted pecans, 2) local cherry serrano pepper jelly and nuetske bacon tiny lardons....Really really tasty.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #76 of 88
Shroom- I top my St Agur or Roquefort with a raw honey I purchased from a local beekeeper. Its not filtered and still has bits of wax etc that I carefully remove before drizzling on top. The flavor of the unrefined honey is rich, deep and almost a pleasantly musky. I put the other cheeses on a separate board. The goats I like with a lil fine EVOO over the top. We serve it at the end of the meal after the dessert course. I got a compliment the other night from a guest that mentioned that they were impressed that all the cheeses were served properly tempered.

Long live fine cuisine!
What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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What a relief! To find out after all these years that I'm not crazy. I'm just culinarily divergent...
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post #77 of 88

Buche Selection Cremier

It's been too long since posting to this thread. Over the past few weeks I've enjoyed a number of wonderful cheeses, and at some point I may catch up posting about them.

This morning I picked up a Buche Selection Cremier, a French goat cheese in the general style of a Bucheron, but a far better tasting and more complex cheese with greater textural characteristics. The cheese is made by the Sèvre & Belle cooperative, well known for it's goat milk products.

The outside rind of the cheese is camembert-like, and below that is a soft, almost oozing layer of richly, but not overpowering, flavored creamy goodness. The center of the log is something of a typical goat cheese, creamy, somewhat chalky (but not overly so), mild in flavor. The center is a nice white color, and the rind and the layer between the rind and center is a soft yellow. This is one fine cheese, especially if you like goat cheese.

Buche Selection Cremier...Goat-Cheese-Delicacies-JGrady Select
post #78 of 88

Wisconsin Gruyere - Sur Choix Roth Kase

Yesterday, along with the Buche Cremier, I picked up a small wedge of a Wisconsin Gruyere after comparing it to a European "cave aged" cheese. This cheese, Roth Kase Specialty Grand Cru Gruyere, is outstanding, offering a great texture (excellent for melting as well as nibbling), a nice depth of complex flavors, and a lovely color. This prize winner is highly recommended, and shows clearly that American made cheeses can certainly go up against the best Europe has to offer.
post #79 of 88
Last week while traveling for work I was in Ann Arbor and went to make my stop at Zingerman's. While there I shipped home the house made Manchester, Goat, and Liptauer. Probably one of my favorite food places in the world.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #80 of 88
Zingerman's is an interesting operation. Getting their goods mail-order is very expensive, and just about everything they sell is available here for less. Still, they do have some unique items, and I like the place - been years since I've been there though. They've expanded quite a bit since my last visit.
post #81 of 88
Blues and goat cheese
post #82 of 88
I love blue cheese and have often bought delicious roqueforts and gorgonzolas from local markets. I can't get my husband to touch the stuff although he has tried it a few times. So imagine my surprise when I finally found a Costco brand of blue cheese called Rosenborg Danish Blue Cheese. He's eating this stuff by the spoonful every day. I must admit it's very good if you get the chance to try it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #83 of 88
I, too, like Danish Blue cheeses!
post #84 of 88
Majorero is my new obsession. Mild but lingering spanish cheese. Very different. Serving it with smoked paprika almonds or apple guava membrillo.

Favorite is St. Agur with honey right now.
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #85 of 88
when having a "cheese meal" anything goat is my fave
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post #86 of 88
I'm fairly ignorant when it comes to cheeses. I like them...I eat them...I'll pick up anything from a same day made mozzarella, Brie, Manchego, Reggiano, or blue. But I just don't know much about different makers etc.

I'm not really opposed to anything but I I know very little about cheeses when it comes to brands, what to select and so on. I normally buy a random cheese and just enjoy.

Recently I had deluxe cheese flight tasting. It was really quite fun! Although I do wish I had a pen and paper with me to take down specific notes :(

  • Buffalo Mozzarella, Fratta Afragola, Campana, Italy (very fresh...good taste and nice texture)
  • Edel de Cleron, France-Comte, France - cow milk
  • Iberico, Toledo, Spain - sheep milk (it was nice, well rounded easy to eat cheese)
  • Cabra al Vino, Murcia, Spain - goat milk
  • Barely Buzzed Cheddar, Behive Cheese Co, Uintah,UT - cow milk (Nice cheedar, but the coffee rind overpowered the small piece that we had)
  • Parmigiano Reggiano, Vacche Rosse, Reggio-Emilia, Italy - cow milk (isn't it always good)
  • Fiori Sardo, Fratta Pinna, Sardinia, Italy - sheep milk
  • Pau's Sant Mateu, Solex, Toledo, Spain - goat milk
  • Lincoln log, Zongerman's Creamery, Ann Arbor MI - goat milk (interesting play with the blend of flavors and textures)
  • Manchego, LaMancha, Spain - sheep milk (nice and full bouquet)
  • Feddost, Nordic Creamery, Westby, WI - cow milk (intersting flavor with the clove not really appearing until the back of your mouth)
  • Ocooch Mountain, Hidden Springs Creamery, Westby, WI - sheep milk
  • Green peoppercorn, Coach Farms, Pine Plains, NY - goat milk (wow, this one doesn't sneak up on you at all. Bam, here I am! )
  • Bayley Hazen Blue, Jasper Hills Farm, Greensboro, VT - cow milk (this was unlike any blue that I've before. The other blues that I've had have always been about the Blue-green mold flavor. But this one was more about the flavor of the milk. I'm guessing a raw milk blue cheese as it had that "from the barn" flavor. Interesting cheese)

I do have other comments about some of the cheeses, but I don't remember which cheese that the comments matched up with (I told you I needed a pen and paper).

All in all...I guess I can conclude that I like cheese :)

dan
post #87 of 88
My favorite cheese is Muenster or a vegetable Havarti. Favorite cheese dish: fondue with crusty bread!
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post #88 of 88
smoked cheddar cheese and asiago that's my favorite
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