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Eggs on a griddle

post #1 of 9
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My owner operator is looking into breakfast as a way to make some money. We have plenty of recipes for this but I cannot make an egg to please him. We are using a clean flat griddle set to about 350 degrees. He says whether they are scrambled or over easy they have a funny taste. He cannot be more specific than that. I have tried clarified butter, vegetable oil, and bacon fat and he says the flavor remains. Any ideas? Thanks in advance for any help.

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post #2 of 9
hmmmm, a well seasoned grill/griddle used lunch&dinner for pork and sauerkraut might indeed impart some interesting flavors to breakfast items....

barring that sort of situation, I'd go for a second opinion set of taste buds on the eggs <g>
post #3 of 9
Just a "funny taste"? He's got to be more specific. Ask him what other food the eggs taste like, or what other substance. If he can't describe it better, you can't do anything about it. (And if he can't describe it, imho he shouldn't be running an eating establishment, but don't tell him I said that. ;) )
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 9
Cook an egg or two on the grill and an egg or two, same style, in a saucepan. Don't tell him which is which, see if he can taste the difference.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 9
Is the griddle cleaned with a grill brick and finished with vinegar at night?
post #6 of 9
You'll be able to tell just looking at them. Maybe that's what he doesn't like, the texture. It is different on the grill. Scrambles are never as fluffy and turns can get crispy. Pans are the best way to go. Besides it free up your grill.
post #7 of 9
After challenging your owner/operator's sense of taste and ability to distinguish good food from bad, don't forget to tell him how much you'd like to date his wife and say he can double with his sister.

He's probably tasting the "warm up." Come in a little earlier, give the griddle a few more minutes to temp so it's well and truly stable. Then grill some bacon. Scrape the griddle down with your spat or board knife before cooking the eggs in your usual butter or clarified -- whatever used to make him happy. The bacon will not only get some good pork-fat action going, it will freshen the season.

All the texture stuff, all the do it in the pan stuff, and so on is right -- but it's his restaurant so keep trying to make his way work. No matter how wrong he is, he's righter about his eggs on his stove than any of us can ever hope to be.

BDL
post #8 of 9
:crazy:
:lol:
:lol:
:lol: sorry that just tickled my funny bone and made me LOL really loudly
Bruce wondered what i was laughing at
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #9 of 9
You said you start with a clean grill, so my thought that leftover olive oil had turned bitter isn't valid.

Hmmm.....fresh eggs, little salt, and clarified butter should work.
You may have others try them.
On that note, how do you think they taste?
Because in the long run, he can hate the eggs, as long as the customers love them.
Might be hard to convince him of that though, as most owners consider their palates to be unquestionably the best.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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