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Apple Crisp

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
For my Food and Wine class, a group of us have to put together a luncheon menu and match the wines. My group wants to make apple crisp. I was thinking, since I've had success combining ginger and vanilla in my apple pie, that we could go with that for the crisp.

I have 3 questions:

1. What's a nice way to spruce up an old favourite? By this I
mean, a dressed up presentation, adding other dimensions (I
was thinking some miniature almond macaroons), sauce, etc.

2. Does anyone have a really good recipe?

3. What wine woud you serve?

Thanks in advance!

A.:confused:
post #2 of 40
You could maybe make a small tart shell or even a flat disk with a light ginger shortbread dough, fill with the apple filling(combination of granny and golden delicious) and then sprinkle on the cinnamon crumble topping. Or go with the almond macaroons and crumble a layer on the bottom of the apples(or the top). I would do the apple crisp warm, and the sauce could be a cinnamon creme angaise or a warm caramel Calvados sauce.
post #3 of 40
Thread Starter 
Angrychef, I LOVE the idea of a warm caramel-Calvados sauce. Do you have a recipe? What about a wine suggestion? Thanks!!
post #4 of 40
I like a crisp that has oatmeal in it, love the taste and it helps keeping the crisp dry. You could however use nuts, pecan with the caramel sauce sounds pretty good. Or you could use a light biscuit dough with or without nuts.

My favourite crisp is from Richard Sax’s Classic Home Desserts. The recipe is actually for a Cranberry Crumble for Fall Fruits but I use only apple. I’ll spare you the fruits list and preparation and the ginger cream that goes with it but if you want it just let me know.

Oat Crunch Topping

3/4 cup old-fashioned or quick cooking oats (not instant)
3/4 cup all purpose flour
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup unsalted butter, cold and cut into pieces

I add a pinch of salt, some spices and omit some of the sugar. I also add spices to the apple.

Preheated the oven to 375°F.

In a food processor, combine the oats, flour, brown sugar and butter. Pulse until the mixture os crumbled to the size of peas; do not over process. Scatter the topping mixture evenly over the fruit.

Bake until the fruit is bubbly and the topping is nicely browned, 50 to 60 minutes. If you’d like to brown the top further, very briefly run it under the broiler. Cool the baking dish on a wire rack until warm.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 
I like that Isa, thanks.

I love the oats too but I think i would like to go with something a bit less rustic this time because of the nature of the event. Crumbled macaroons would work, but I wonder if there isn't anything else that I could use... Nah, maybe not.

I haven't made apple crisp in a LONG time... Do you guys and gals think it would be opssible to do it in a large tray, only 2 inches deep or so, and use a round cutter to portion it out? Think that would work?
post #6 of 40
With the apple "shrinkage factor", you won't be left with much if you only use a 2 inch deep mould. I do like the cutter idea, would make it really clean.


I do like the nuts idea. That might be more elegant than oatmeal.


In terms of crust you are a bit limited, its either a biscuit like crust, a pie like crus, or a crisp/crumble crust.


Why not an apple charlotte with caramel sauce. Still have the apple but it is a bit more elgant. I have a southern style cobbler with pecan-crunch topping. The topping is roll and cut using a cookie cutter.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #7 of 40
Thread Starter 
Sorry, what I meant was that the end-result would be 2 inches deep... If I do use a cutter, I just hope it doesn't fall apart on the plate...

Regarding the topping, I think I'll stick to the crumble; I think it provides the most contrast in terms of texture.
post #8 of 40
I think of a crisp as an oatmeal topping exactly as Isa posted. Your talking crumble Anneke, which is fine too.

You lost me on:

A crisp or crumb consists of loose fruit with a pastry top (of sorts) how can you use a cookie cutter and pick up portions? Unless you've thickened your fruit to be a solid mass. Then if your putting your fruit filling into a bottom pastry then you have a tart or a pie, not a crisp or a crumble.....

A couple ideas:

Use a phyllo cup shell for your bottom. Cook/bake your apples seperate and your crumb seperate. Fill your shells to order and then top with a quenelle of cinnamon ice cream/or whipped cream. Tuck a dried apple slice (or you can go into fancier apple shapes using grated apple) into your ice cream and drizzle calvados sauce on plate.

I like two contrasting sauces drizzled on my plate, carmel and calvados angaise (for the colors).

You also could make hippen spoons (or leafs, etc...) and tuck those into your fruit or dairy topping (if you choose to use one). Even if you don't use a dairy ontop making something out of hippen will you nice height.

You also can decorate plates with cinnamon dusting it thru a stencil for a easy garnish.

Using phyllo is very quick, very light compared to any other crusts. You can sprinkle it with cinnamon sugar (or gingered sugar etc...) between your layers for flavor too.

I need the dairy to compliment the sugared apples. You could even do a semi-freddo to compliment, that would be very nice....
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #9 of 40
That makes more sense Anneke.


I do love your phyllo cup idea Wendy. As for crips, crumble, etc. here's what Richard Sax says in Classic Home Dessert:

Cobbler is fruit baked with a crust. Most crumble are made with a top crust of biscuit dough, which can be either a single solid layer or individual biscuits.

Crisp refers to the most casual member of these fruit desserts in which fruits is topped with rubbed mixture of butter, sugar, flour and sometimes nuts.

Crumble is the English cousin to our crisp. It has a crunchy shortbread like topping of oats, butter, flour and brown sugar.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #10 of 40
Anneke, for the caramel sauce my proportions are 2 # sugar, 8 oz. water, 2 cups cream, 4 oz. butter and 2 oz. Calvados. Add more cream or milk if you want it thinner. I'd either steep the cream with a couple cinnamon sticks or just use ground cinnamon(I like the tiny specks in the sauce).

As for the wine, I'm not much of a wine drinker so maybe do a search on epicurious for some hints. Something light and fruity would go well with the crisp, I think.

I love anything apple with vanilla ice cream, specially if the dessert is served warm. You could also make tiny florentine cups and fill with a small scoop of vanilla ice cream to serve next to the crisp.
post #11 of 40
Thread Starter 
Wendy, that's so cool: after thinking about it for a bit and discussing it with one of my teachers today, I decided to do everything separate and into phyllo cups, with a dried apple chip. Imagine that!

Two things:

What is 'hippen'.
and
Can you really cook the crumb separately? Just oats, brown sugar, spices and onto a baking sheet in the oven?

Angry, thanks for the recipe.

I'd like to do ice cream but that will add to my food cost. But then again, so will Calvados. I'll have to cost it out and see....
post #12 of 40
It works to punch out rounds of day-old apple crisp. It's how I use up a pan of it. Recycle it the next night and plate it and dress it up. It holds together pretty well.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #13 of 40
TBH, I don't get how you reheat it....and it holds its' shape, really? I alway left mine in ramikins for the guys to reheat. But the crisp turns horrible in the micro. How do you reheat it bighat?

I've made topping seperate before but the sucess of it really does depend upon what topping you use. The oats do need to absorb some liquid, so they don't work quite as well as other toppings. I guess I thought you were doing an American crumb, more along the lines of a coffee cake topping with more flour (that would work better with crisp phyllo, hint, hint). There are cobbler topping that bake like a cross between a cake and a biscuit, that are nice....


Peirre Herme in his first book with Dorie Greenspan has a cheesecake torte (of sorts, I forget the exact detail) but he instructs you to make your crumb seperately. I thought his crumb worked out quite well (I liked that, more than the torte). If it interests you I can post it?

Hippen is a paste much like a tuile paste but it bakes just a hair thinner. Except it main ingredient is almond paste (tuiles are cheaper but less delicate). It holds it's shape well even through the freezer. You either buy or make a stencil (it's easy to make) and on parchement paper that's sprayed and floured you just frost you paste on, using the stencil (it doesn't spread when baked so you can do very detailed items). You'll see many examples of it in Bo Friebergs book.

If you worked your recipe THBs' way cutting out circles you could make tuile cookies that would contain your apples. I can't think of a source for you to look at right this second, but I can get back to you on that. You make your stencil like a long triangle, bake your tuile then while it's hot shape it around a cylander object to the width your apples are cut with one end of the triangle, then your other end goes up in the air.

If you can't afford calvados you can use a poached apple puree to flavor. But it changes the texture.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #14 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thanks Wendy for all that info. Now I'll have something to research and practice on my own during school break! I actually do find all of this fascinating (confirming my friends' theory that I'm a freak), unfortunately, I have to work within the constraints imposed by the school's restaurant, where we will be producing this menu for a pannel. By constraints, I mean both money and time. Everything has to be prepared that morning, and only one or two students will be working on it so the simpler the better... I love the idea of tuiles or their alternatives but I think that might freak a few people out.

What do you think of this ( instead of a crumble top):
Phyllo cups sprinkled with sugar and something (probably not cinnamon because of the flavours in the apples), prebaked. Fill with sautéed apples with ginger and vanilla. Top with a perfect slice of apple chip. Top that with a quenelle of ginger ice cream. Oh, and some sauce below all that. What do you think?
post #15 of 40
What about some kind of streusel top that you could bake on it's own? Once cooked it could be cut and put on top of the apple... hmmm the apple.... What will you call this new dessert Anneke?
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #16 of 40
Thread Starter 
If you have a recipe, I'd love to see it!
post #17 of 40
I'm lost. A recipe for what??
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #18 of 40
Thread Starter 
For the streusel top. Sorry to be so naive about something so basic... It's just not the sort of thing I do very often...
post #19 of 40
It's not something I do either Anneke. I just had the idea while reading the last few posts on this thread. I'm not sure what you would like your topping to contain, i.e. nuts, oatmeal, etc... I checked a few books and found the following recipes.


3/4 cup all purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar, packed
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup very cold butter, cut into 1/2 inch pieces.

Combine all the dry ingredients in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add the butter and pulse several times until the mixture is a crumbly consistency. Be careful not to over mix or the topping will become doughlike. Refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze for up to one month. It's a filling for a multifruit Danish ring. Makes 2 cups.

From The Village Baker's Wife by Gayle and Joe Ortiz

I just found a recipe for a pear crisp in a skillet. It might be perfect for your idea. The fruits are cooked on top of the stove then the topping is added and it bakes for about 20 in a 400°F oven. I'll just type the topping recipe for now but if you want the whole recipe just let me know.

1/2 cup pecans
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon light brown sugar, lightly packed
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3/4 cup unbleached pastry flour or unbleached all purpose flour
3 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1 inch cubes and frozen
1/2 extra large egg, beaten equal to 2 tablespoons

In the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade, grind the pecans and sugars to a fine meal. Add the salt, baking powder, cinnamon and flour and process to combine. Add the butter and pulse on and off until it is the consistency of coarse meal. Transfer to a bowl. Add the measured egg and toss together to incorporate. Chill until ready to use.

From Pastries From La Brea Bakery by Nancy Silverton


1 1/3 cups all purpose flour
2 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
2/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
11 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, thinly sliced

In a food processor, combine the flour, cinnamon and sugar. Add the vanilla and pulse to mix. Add the butter, a few pieces at a time, and pulse until the mixture crumbles into pieces about twice the size of peas. Refrigerate or freeze the streusel if not using immediately. It's a topping for crumb buns to be bake at 350°F for 30 to 35 minutes.

From: Classic Home Desserts by Richard Sax
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #20 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thank you Isa, very sweet of you... Will print tonight and read in the subway tomorrow...
post #21 of 40
Truthfully, having both ginger seasoned items(apple filling and ice cream) bothers me. I think I'd pull back on the ginger in my apples (keep them along the lines of brown sugar and vanilla, a splash of apple vinegar kicks the flavor (dont' laugh!)). Then let my ginger flavored vanilla ice cream (NOT too strong) as it melts take over the flavor into my apple filling (does that make sense?). Too much of any strong flavor will deaden your taste of it.

You could add nuts or raisins to your apple filling for more interest or place them around you plate with your sauce. Also if your under time constraints you might need to change your garnish because apple chips take a bit to dry. You could also make flowers/a crown of, out of phyllo to place ontop of your ice cream. You make your buttered sheets as usual but then you cut into long strips. Then you gather your strip up (like cinching a purse), place it into a small muffin pan (to hold it's shape you might need to put some foil in the tin to make it a smaller pan) and bake. Try using brown sugar in between your layers instead of white and no seasoning in you phyllo.

You can add almost any seasoning/flavoring to plain vanilla ice cream, and it's not bad. Do that right away and put it back in the freezer to firm up or it won't work well. But you'll need to pre-test this, you might find that a finely, FINELY minced candied ginger is more of the flavor you want than powdered ginger....??

(If your not putting a topping on your filling you could make them into apple purses and place you icecream next to it......)

Are they grading you on costs too? Then I wouldn't buy the calvados. Personally, I'd probably go with a carmel sauce and use either candied ginger, brittle, or sugared pecans on my plate for further interest.


Isa crumbs all look pretty good to me!!! Anyone of those will do fine! Just lose the cinnamon and add ginger (not the same quanity, about 1/4 the amount of cinnamon or less), or skip the seasoning all together.

P.S. For you apple filling, saute them but you should still bake them. It really makes a difference.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #22 of 40
This thread made me really glad I just bought some apples! What great ideas everyone has.

To get back to Anneke's question about wine, here are several general suggestions, in increasing body and degree of sweetness:

Riesling (German will be lighter but sweeter than California)
Sylvaner
Moscato
a late-harvest auslese, all the way up to eiswein
Barsac or Sauternes
Tokay

I have some personal favorites, but I don't know if they're available up there:
Bonny Doon vineyard's "Vin de glaciere" (from California)
North River Winery (Jacksonville, Vermont) makes apple-based wines, some of which are medium-bodied -- one in particular is made with maple syrup as well.
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post #23 of 40

Very special Ciders

Neige, Canaille and Frimas are three of the best Ciders in Quebec and will pair very well with any apple dessert, foie gras, a good blue cheese or even better: an aged Cheddar and a pear!

What a good «excuse» to come to Montreal or get a friend to send you a bottle... These ciders are usually available from mid-October to February.
K

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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #24 of 40
Cider is a lot less expensive than Calvados. You could use it to deglaze the apple and/or serve it as a drink if you want the full apple dessert.


Or you could make sorbet or granita but that might be pushing it.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #25 of 40
What have you decided to do Anneke??
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #26 of 40
Thread Starter 
I've shared my (your) ideas with my group, but I haven't finalised anything. The day after my last post, I received some alarming news about my father's health, and have thankfully been temporarily relieved of my duties towards the group. Making plans to travel back home for a few days as we are expecting the worst... Can't thank all of you enough for your ideas.
post #27 of 40
I hope your dad is okay, Anneke. :(
post #28 of 40
Sorry to hear about your father. Take care!
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #29 of 40
Thoughts and prayers to you and your family, Anneke.
post #30 of 40
So sorry to hear about your father Anneke, hope he'll get better quickly.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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