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Oversized Okra Pods, what-to-do?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I was unexpectatly called away from home (and my garden) for serveral days, but forgot to tell my Okra plants I would be away. The little guys kept working as usual, and when I returned I had a nice crop of Okra pods, but very large pods - 6 to 7 inches long each!
I know they will be tough if I try to cook them normally, but hate to waste them, probably 25 or 30 pods.
Anyone have any recipies that might salvage them, either to 'tenderize' them or whatever! Thanks in advance for any help!
Chris
post #2 of 6
Greek Braised Okra

- 1lb okra, cut into 2 inch pieces
- One cup distilled vinegar (for soaking)
- 1 large onion chopped
- 3 medium tomatoes chopped, seeds and skins removed
- 1/3 cup olive oil
- salt/pepper
- fresh chopped parsley

1. In a large bowl place the okra with the vinegar and fill with water. Allow to soak for at least 15 minutes. (this helps get rid of the sliminess)
2. Wash and drain the okra.
3. In a pot sweat the onions in the olive oil until translucent, and stir in the tomatoes.
4. When the tomatoes have begun releasing some juices add the okra and sautee.
5. Season with salt/pepper and parsley and add 1 cup of water.
6. Cover and simmer for 1/2 hour or until okras are soft. This can be done either on the stove top or in the oven.
7. Be very careful and stir gently as vigorous prodding will mush up the okra.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 6
six-seven inch okra pods make the best compost . . .
post #4 of 6
CeeBee, if they're truly oversized there's not much you can do about it except save the seeds (if they're open pollinated) and compost the rest.

While it's true that most okra varieties are past their prime if they get much larger than your thumb, that's not always true. The cowhorn types, for isntance, remain tender at six and seven inches.

The way to test is this. The very end of the pod forms a thin, pointer-like tip. Use just your thumb or index finger to bend that tip. If it doesn bend readily, the pod will still be tender. If not, not.

BTW, dried okra pods make interesting additions to floral displays and centerpieces. So you might just let them go until they dry on the vine, and use them for that purpose.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thanks Mapiva, you saved the day! Cooked off the beasts last night w/your recipe and it was wonderful, a hit even with the kids! Didnt bother telling anyone they were enjoying the fruits of Pop trying to salvage his screwup. . . :D
Thanks again!
post #6 of 6
So glad it worked out. I'm making okra tomorrow too.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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