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Pasta Gravy recipes requested...

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I understand this could turn into a political/religious/pro-choice-ish debate quickly, but I figured I'd ask anyway.

I'm looking for just a good simple pasta gravy recipe...Not looking for Giada's "additions" or anything like that.....just a MmmmMMmmm good gravy.

Fiance has a "big day" tomorrow and I promised her anything for dinner, she requested homemade pasta sauce and pasta.

Also, what type of short pastas go best with just a simple gravy....


my father insists on using San Marizano tomatos, which I will...(in a can of course) and I'll be using my Le Creuset cast/enamel sauce pan (not dutch oven, unless I decide to make a lot then freeze?)
post #2 of 17
I just typed and attempted to send a rather long, detailed message about making a lovely "summer" tomato sauce, and the forum crashed as I was sending the message. I may try again later, but maybe not.

It's San Marzano tomatoes. When making most simple tomato-based sauces, I use a sauté pan. The work goes faster.

See ya ....

shel
post #3 of 17
...crashed

oh yeah... I compose everything in WordPad then copy paste to the forum block. if CF blow up, I just save WordPad for a later attempt.

it's my default mode since the online default is "I'm gonna' blow up jest you watch!"
post #4 of 17
I often do something similar :mad:

scb
post #5 of 17
RP -

at this time of year there's absolutely no substitute for vine ripe redredred maters.

scald, peel, de-seed - now you got the basics.
not especially quick - short cut: something canned in the tomato line.....

s&p
onion/shallot/leek - or a mix thereof
garlic if it floats your boat
finely diced celery (cook time...)
diced green pepper
dice pepper with (heat of your choice) - I tripped over banana peppers and am enjoying "doing everything long slender and sorta' yellow....."
mystery ingredient: mashed up anchovy
mystery II: shot of bourbon/brandy - or a veddy tart white wine

I find the approach of: "pick a flavor direction" and keep it simple stupid works mucho best grande.....
post #6 of 17
Here's something very easy and kickback; I originally wrote it for Jason. You may want to tweak it with some red pepper flakes. Dress it down with some grilled meat, preferably sausage in onions and peppers, and some garlic toast on the side.

Sugo for Paisans:

1 onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic, minced
2 tbs tomato paste
3 tbs extra virgin olive oil
1 28 oz can plum or (preferably) San Marzano tomatoes, whole, peeled and seeded; or, 1 28 oz can of crushed tomatoes (see Note.)
3 tbs sugar, divided
1 glass red wine
2 tsp instant coffee
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 tsp dried basil
1 tsp dried oregano or marjoram
1 tbs salt, divided

Drain the tomatoes, reserve the juice, and rough chop the tomatoes.

Saute the onions on medium high heat in olive oil until sweated and just beginning to brown. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, two minutes at most. Add the tomato paste, and move the vegetables through it. Cook until the paste darkens, another three or four minutes.

Add the tomatoes, half the juice, reduce the heat to medium, and bring to a simmer. Adjust the flame to hold a medium simmer. Add 2 tbs sugar, the wine, the instant coffee (or a shot of espresso) and the pepper flakes. Simmer 15 minutes, until wine is cooked.

Taste and adjust for sugar and wine. Add the herbs, crumbling them into the sauce. Let simmer another 15 minutes.

Taste and adjust for herbs, and salt. It may not need any salt, depending on the type of tomatoes ues. Continue to simmer until the tomatoes are almost, but not completely melted. Probably another half hour, altogether. If sauce is too thick, thin with the remaining juice, water, and/or wine as desired.

This sugo is as unadorned as can be, add anything that tickles your fancy.

Note: This sauce will be slightly chunky. It may be milled, sieved, processed, blended or otherwise pureed to smooth it. Alternatively, it may be made with crushed tomatoes instead of whole.


With this menu, beer or cheap red. Think juicy -- Chianti, Barolo, Zin, Barb, "Big House Red," and other wallet-buddies.

Say "hey" to NRatched, and remember...

Beer is your friend,
BDL
post #7 of 17
What do you mean by "gravy" sauce for pasta? The word reminded me of the traditional Kretan rice pilaf dish that is served at weddings. It starts off by boiling an old goat (not a young kid mind you). The broth is then used to boil the rice in. When the rice is cooked you add "staka" butter and lemon to it and serve it with pieces of goat meat. Rice is used for weddings. All other times they make it with pasta instead.

Does that work for you as "gravy"???

Staka is a butter that is made from goats milk. I used to watch my Grandmother make it. She would milk the goat and then boil the milk to pastuerize it. Then she would skim the congealed fat off the top of the milk and place it in a jar. Everyday she would add to that jar and allow it to rest at room temperature over the course of the month. The stuff in the jar is staka butter.

Ok ok, my simple tomato sauce is made by sweating 1 small finely chopped onion and 1 finely chopped garlic clove in evoo. I then add a can of crushed tomatoes, black pepper, 2 cloves, and salt. Dash of red wine too. I toss the spaghetti in it and voila.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 17
The though of boiling old goats fills me with trepidation.

Baa,
BDL
post #9 of 17
I'm sure Anthony Bourdain wouldn't have any reservations about trying it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #10 of 17
And in my opinion, New Jersey tomatoes can't be beat! Some might be as good (just maybe), but none better!
post #11 of 17
I don't know about that. He's an old goat, too.

BDL
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
well, I ended up doing a duck ragu (from batali)....came out great....

(with a caprese salad with some NJ tomatoes and some other local heirlooms!!!! )

full pics and report tomorrow......you know me. ; )


p.s. by gravy i just meant a simple red sauce.....nothing special....but "special" ;)

BDL, I'll try yours next.

and yes, I had to get a bunch of NJ tomatoes today......couldn't pass it up...nothing beats them.
post #13 of 17
I've not studied the Italian language, but it seems to me that linquistically, gravy, sauce and sugo are sort of like broth and stock in english. The terms are interchangeable, though some folks in some areas have distinct ideas about which is which. But like RPM said in his original query this doesn't need to turn into a religious debate.

Anyway, my basic sauce is a lot like what BDL wrote up. I don't put coffee in mine, but usually a tablespoon or two of chopped black olives, with their brine. And I like anchovies.

During the summer, though, I often forego making a long simmering sauce and just sweat some onions and garlic with a bit of basil, then add some coarsely chopped fresh tomatoes just long enough to heat them up. Dump it on the pasta, red pepper flakes to taste, top with grated cheese and enjoy.

And Big House Red is a great wine for such dinners.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 17
sugo means juice or sauce. Succo means juice like apple juice, orange juice, but sugo is a variation on succo (with obviously the same root) and is sometimes used to mean the same. But sugo also and more commonly means pan drippings, tomato sauce (like pasta sauce), the juice that comes out of any cooking food. Broth instead, is "brodo" - quite a different beast (old goats aside).

And BDL, now come on, what's teh difference between boiling an old goat and boiling an old chicken and getting a nice soup out of it, eh? Well, with the exception, in the category of old goats, of anthony bourdain - i wouldn;t want to eat him (since i think scavenger mammals are not very good to eat).
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #15 of 17
Another internet joke that sunk in the Arctic Ocean between London and New York. The joke is: I'm an old goat; and so is Anthony Bourdain.

Actually, I believe in eating goat, and like goat and kid meat prepared in a variety of ways. At some point in the late sixties I lived on a commune with goats and horses, and ended up being the caretaker for both since everyone else was too stoned and irresponsible. There I learned my optimal ovine vocation was eating rather than milking goats.

BDL
post #16 of 17
glug glug glug
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
made BDL's recipe...added a leftover shallot, and only put about 5oz of wine (chianti) in....came out great..I loved the kick of the pepper flakes, and added just a TAD more. a little more garlic too.

one thing I'm noticing is that I'm whipping up things much faster and without thinking. I can read a basic recipe, and since I understand the steps a little better and understand what its going to taste like...don't usually have to look at it again....great feeling.










Perfect amount for a box of pasta too. I did use crushed tomatoes though.
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