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How to make pliable Isomalt?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hey All, I'm new to the forum but I've been searching all the old threads and can't quite find what I'm looking for. Any help would be much appreciated!

I've been trying to make 1/10" rods out of Isomalt that are sturdy, but not brittle. I've tried boiling the Isomalt up to various temperatures and then pushing the cooling syrup out of a syringe to create the rods. I'm getting the shapes that I need but the fully cooled rods are too brittle to shape (fyi: I do need them to be a little pliable when fully cooled and especially not brittle).

Any suggestions? What am I doing wrong? Lay it on me, I've got thick skin :)

Jason
post #2 of 14

sugar

You are trying to boil Isomalt and use for what? after your done.? I use it all the time for showpieces, and never once has it been plyable after it cools where did you hear of htis applacation.? I'm going to research for you.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm sorry, I didnt exactly make it clear. I don't even know if this is possible but I would like to use Isomalt to create thin rods that are still shapeable after they have cooled. I dont want them to be floppy but I also don't want them to be brittle.

I have created these rods using a sugar, light corn syrup and cream of tartar but they tend to get pretty sticky after sitting out.

Again, I don't have much experience with this I'm just researching possibilities :-)
post #4 of 14
How do you feel about buying vinyl tubing? we used it in class and my theory is that you can shape it and then cut it off. or get the rods, get it cooled off 'enough' and then cut it off and then shape it. (which is what we did).
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Lessa, that's a good thought but I'd like to stick with an Isomalt recipe if possible.

Are there any additives ( ie tartaric acid for sugar) than can be used with Isomalt to prevent it from becoming brittle?
post #6 of 14
Glucose.

and we did use isomalt in that class. I haven't had coffee yet, so I will look up a recipe from class for you. ;-)
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info! I just ordered some up. And if you happen to come across a recipe please let me know.

Thanks again!
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Do you have an idea as to how much glucose I should add to the Isomalt? I was going start with 50:1 (Isomalt:glucose) but thats just a shot in the dark :/
post #9 of 14
Ok, so I looked in my Notter book and found:


For pulling and blowing:

1000g Isomalt
100g Water

or

1000g Sugar
400g water
200g Glucose
10 drops Tartaric Acid

boil water to 320 F/ 160 C


for casting

Isomalt is the same, but temp goes to 340-360F

no recipe given for sugar.
post #10 of 14
Hi there. I may be butting in enJAneer, but I think that you misunderstood what Lessa was saying: buy the vinyl tubing that has the inside diameter of your desired tube of Isomalt and use it as a mold. Pour the isomalt in the tube, shape it however you desire (figuring out a way to keep the tube in the shape you want) until the Isomalt cools. Then, use a blade to cut away the tube.

If I'm mistaken, I'm sorry, but when I read your original question, my first thought was to use vinyl tubing as a mold as well.

Best of luck:smiles:
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
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Jenni
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post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi jfield, you are right! I did misunderstand what Lessa was trying to explain. Although that does sound like a good way to shape the isomalt, I would still like to be able to shape it after its been cooled. Thanks for clearing that up tho! :thumbs up:
post #12 of 14
Glad to help. However, I don't think it's really possible to do too much shaping after the tube has cooled. Maybe hit it with a heat gun in short bursts and bend??
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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Jenni
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Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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post #13 of 14
Here's what I do:

I take 1 inch vinyl tubing, tape the unpoured side to the side of your table. Tape it really well, it gets heavy.

prep your sugar/isomalt and carefully (I do this with a towel around my hand sort of like a funnel) pour product into the tube. make sure you pull up just a bit so the air bubbles float to the top. tape pouring end to it's end of the table well.

When the tube is touch-able, pull from edge of table and lay out flat and re-tape. when tube is cool and product will still maintain it's form, slice the vinyl off using an exacto blade or equivalent.

You can then cut into pieces to work with, roll out thinner, stretch and pull, whatever you like.

Now, I get coffee!!
post #14 of 14
Hi all, I spray my isomalt that I use for showpieces with car lacquer as it is not going to be eaten. It holds it own for weeks and doesnt go tacky and sticky.
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