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Forgot the salt.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I made some french bread dough about an hour ago, and it's still on its first rise, and I just realized I forgot the salt. Should I just knead some salt in before the second rise? Dissolve the salt in a tiny bit of water and then knead that in? Leave it as is and have unsalted bread?
post #2 of 15
(deleted - user error)
post #3 of 15
I disagree very strongly with Dillbert.

There are four critical elements to bread: Flour, moisture, leavening and salt.

Get out your salt shaker, we're gonna use that baby.

Instead of punching the bread down after the first rise, fold it, by dumping it out of the bowl on to the board and gently stretching it into a square. Then fold it letter style as follows (salting as you fold):

Lightly salt the top with your salt shaker. Then fold one side two thirds of the way toward the second side, and lightly salt the newly exposed side. Fold the remaining third over the salt, and lightly salt the newly exposed side. This should net you a rectangle -- about one third as wide as the original square.

Now fold it letter style again from the bottom and the top -- salting the first exposed side, but not the last. You now have a roughly cube shaped piece of dough with 9 surfaces, 7 of which have been salted. Replace the dough in the bowl and let it take another rise before forming loaves.

To form loaves, cut the dough into as many pieces as there will be loaves. Stretch each piece into a square about 2/3 as long as the desired finished length and roll them up, jelly roll style. Then use these rolls to form your loaves in the usualy way. This will distribute the salt well enough, and form the basis for a great loaf, too.

The "next-best" alternative is to try and knead the salt into the dough as evenly as possible. But you run the risk of over kneading and coming out with a tough, tight crumbed loaf. I'd prefer that to no salt, though.

BDL
post #4 of 15
There's a huge area of italy that insists on eating salt-free bread - in umbria and part of tuscany. It has a lousy texture and no flavor, though i guess if you grow up with it you like it. The story is that the pope put a huge tax on salt and the independent-minded people of umbria and tuscany who were in the vatican state at the time (centuries ago when the vatican was a large and powerful country) protested by not adding salt to the bread.
The story doesn;t convince me, because if you were going to do a salt boycott the first thing to go would be the prosciuttos and other preserved food. the salt in bread is negligible in comparison. But it makes a good tale.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 15
What's the (deleted-user error) about?
post #6 of 15
If you left out the salt in the bread, you can easily make up for it by how you serve it. I don't see it as an obstacle. In fact, some of the saltier accompaniments to bread might be perfect with your bread.
post #7 of 15
I disagree, oregonyeti, i think even eaten with something very salty, unsalted bread is different all around, a different texture, a different rise, and a taste that just isn;t right. but then i am a salt addict.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #8 of 15
Salt adds flavor, aids in texture by relaxing gluten, slows fermentation by retarding the growth of the yeast, and helps with crust and crumb coloration.

Salt is more than just flavor.

Hey, I would start another dough, add the old dough ( like an old dough starter if you will) and then the double amount of salt mid way through the development process.

or save the unsalted dough as a starter or food for a sour.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #9 of 15
Siduri,
My mother complained bitterly about the bread in Umbria w/o salt!!!
:crazy:

I know what you mean.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #10 of 15
On the other hand, Tuscan - Umbrian ciabatta is the best. Love the chew.

BDL
post #11 of 15
Ah, ok, I didn't know it affected more than flavor. Now I do.
post #12 of 15
OY,

It affects so many things including how moisture is held and distributed. As I said there are four necessities to making good bread -- everything else is a variation -- but you have to have leavening, flour, hydration and salt to make good bread. In fact, flour, water, salt, yeast are all you need.

The reason I tsuggested that Penguinbeats (wonder what happened with him/her and the bread?) to use the salt shaker is because it has table salt, and table salt dissolves more easily than sea salt or kosher salt and will diffuse through the bread while the yeast and gluten develops (two rises after adding the salt), through nothing more than the layering techniques of folding and pin-wheeling. My feeling was that if (s)he'd kneaded the bread correctly, kneading the salt in would be too much kneading.

The dough gets increasingly sensitive to kneading after every rise -- siduri can give you testimony on that.

Stuff happens sometimes to even the most disciplined and careful cooks. And even more often to people like me. You do what you can to make the most graceful recovery possible. One of the people who had the strongest influences on me was Graham Kerr (the Galloping Gourmet), because of the way he never panicked, kept his cool, and made the save. I recall a show in which he was talking about one dish, stirring another,while chopping a dishtowel in half because it had caught on fire, sweeping it onto the set floor, and stomping it out -- without ever missing a beat.

Speaking of saves, I liked m.brown's ideas quite a bit, too.

Time for a short slurp,
BDL
post #13 of 15
Hah! Funny story about Graham Kerr:bounce:

Reminds me of some saves I have done in customers' homes. (I do heating and air conditioning). Once I accidentally shorted a control circuit in a condenser unit with my needle-nose pliers. I was hoping that all I did was blow a fuse. I went inside and walked by the thermostat and it was dead. I opened up the furnace to work on it and found the 3 amp fuse on the control board blown. That was a 1-minute fix, replacing it. If the thermostat had taken the damage, that would have been a lot more difficult. As it was, the customer never knew I screwed up. WHEW

I'll fess up to my mistakes if it's not that simple to fix them. I also do whatever I can to minimize them in the first place.
post #14 of 15
if you are REALLY lucky, sometimes you will even make a mistake to your future benefit, something of an ah-ha moment.
Or at least learn from it :)
Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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post #15 of 15
WAY off topic, but can;t resist-

Oh my god, the galloping gourmet, i remember him. Julia child's tv show taught me cooking technique like holding a knife, and opened my mind up to many things and her recipes are perfect, easy to follow, always come out, but i think for style, food flying all over the kitchen, dishtowels on fire, and no-nonsense ideas, I identified more with his. I don;t remember any of his recipes or even what kind of food he cooked, but I took in the pure joy of the kitchen as a playground/battlefield. And his wonderfully simple, obvious and quick way of slicing apples was a revelation and i;ve done it ever since. (Stand the apple up, cut to the side of the core, lay it on that flat part, cut the other side of the core, turn to the other flat side and cut the other side of the core... then lay it on the third side and cut the rest off the core. Then with the pieces flat side down, just slice away, rat tat tat tat tat.) I still read recipes that tell you for an apple pie to "peel and core the apple, then slice" - if it;s not a tart with visible apple slices why on earth would you core it with a corer?
Oh, yes, and he said "parsley stems have as much flavor as the leaves, just chop them up fine"
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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