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Adapting a fried eggplant recipe.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Last night I made fried egg plant from a recipe that someone showed me.

I cut the eggplant into slices (about 1 / 4" thick), dipped the slices first into flour to lightly coat them, then dipped them into egg for another light coat, then dipped them into bread crumbs for a heavy coat.

Some slices I dipped into the egg and bread crumbs a second time.

Then I fried the slices in a pan on the stove in about 1/2" of olive oil for about 2 minutes per side to get them golden brown.

They were delicious and even my wife liked them. However, she asked if they could be baked instead of fried, to cut down on the oil.

So, that's my question - can the recipe or steps be adapted for baking in the oven? I figure I won't get that nice golden brown color on the bread crumbs.

Thanks.
post #2 of 17
Yes. In short, you can pretty much follow the same recipe and technique and then put the eggplant into a lightly greased dish, or perhaps on a silpat, and bake them. I would guess at around 350-deg F for about hour. You could also put them on a rack in a baking pan and bake them, maybe eliminating the fat in the pan. If, when they're done, they don't have that nice, golden crust, a few minutes under the broiler will do the trick.

Caveat: I've never "oven fried" eggplant, so my time/temp is just a guess. However, I have prepared other foods using the technique, so I know it works. There are lots of recipes out there for eggplant and other vegetables, chicken, pork cops ....

Have fun,

shel
post #3 of 17
Eggplant parmesan is a nice way to do this. If you've got a bit of extra time you may want to draw some of the excess water out of the eggplant first. Peel ( or not - older, larger specimans tend towards bitter skins, I usually peel regardless ) and slice. Place some slices in a colander, hit with a dose of table salt. Another layer of eggplant, another dose of salt. If you are only cooking for the two of you, most likely there won't be that much eggplant and not many layers. Let it sit for a while, allowing the salt to draw out some moisture.

After an hour or two, rinse the eggplant slices, rinse again, and drain on paper towels. Then do your flour, egg, crumb thing, arranging the coated slices in a lightly greased baking dish. Stick into a 350 F oven for about 5 minutes. Flip them over, you'll probably get some crust sticking and pulling away from the slices, don't worry too much about it. The cheese and sauce will cover a multitude of sins. Then back in for another 4 -5 minutes.

While the eggplant is baking, warm up a cup or two of your favorite spaghetti sauce over low heat. Prepare a sufficient quantity of mozzarella slices to cover the eggplant. Fresh, soft cheese in brine is the best, but harder blocks of more processed stuff will work too. You can even grate it to get even coverage, though I prefer mine a bit more blobby, so to speak.

Pull the eggplant out of the oven and arrange the cheese over each slice. Spoon on the sauce, be generous. Top the whole mess with grated parm, perhaps oregano and crushed red pepper flakes. Back into the oven for another 15 minutes or so, when the whole thing should be nice, bubbly and aromatic.

If you're not opposed to eating pork, a few thin slices of proscuitto or speck placed on the eggplant slices before you layer on the cheese is a nice addition.

mjb.

.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 17
Another way to draw off the extra moisture is to layer your peeled slices between paper towels with a plate on the top to apply slight pressure. Place in the fridge for an hour or so then you're ready to go.


Willie
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Sounds yummy! A couple of questions.

One, how thick would you cut the egg plant slices?

Also, when I'm rinsing the eggplant slices (after I salted them), do I need to be careful about how much moisture gets back into the eggplant slices?

And, after I've baked the slices, am I putting two layers of cheese on teh slices (one layer under the sauce, and then one layer on top of the sauce)?

Also, I'm figuring on putting the completed eggplant slice onto a nice roll and adding some alfalfa sprouts.:look:
post #6 of 17
About 3/4 of an inch or so. Roughly as thick as your thumb.

You shouldn't have much water getting back into the slices when rinsing. When draining on the paper towels you could use Willie24's suggestion about weighting them down a bit to squeeze out some more. Sort of like drying a block of tofu.

I put a layer of the mozzarella on the eggplant, then the sauce, and top with a generous dusting of grated parm. So yes, two layers of cheese. But there's no law that I am aware of that says you can't add more mozz on top of the sauce. Fresh basil, too, if you've got it.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 17
Have you ever seen anyone use a deep fryer to make the eggplant paremesan? I always end up using so much olive oil for this recipe. It's necessary to fry it, yet, but I thought maybe it would be easier to do it all at once in a deep fryer. It certainly sounds less healthy, but I'm unsure if it would work at all. Thanks for the posts, I'd appreciate any feedback.
post #8 of 17
wow, again I post on a thread from a couple years ago! I have to start checking the dates!
post #9 of 17
Old or not, good questions still should be answered.

Reason you're using too much olive oil is that you can't get it hot enough, and the eggplant is absorbing some of it. That's the basic reason why "they" say frying is unhealthy.

Try switching to an oil with a higher smoke point, and heat it to 350F. Add your eggplant slices and fry until the breading turns brown and crisp---which shouldn't take very long. Don't crowd the pan, or you'll steam them instead of frying.

Instead of draining on paper towels (which, in effect, means you have them sitting in a puddle of oil), drain them on racks.

See if that doesn't make a difference for you.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 17
I don't think the original question was answered well enough.  I don;t think you can get anywhere the same taste baking eggplant slices as frying them.  I would like to hear from someone who has tried both and says they taste the same.  They can't.  My solution, eat fried eggplant rarely, but eat it well!  Forget the ersatz "fried" eggplant.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by novice_01 View Post

Last night I made fried egg plant from a recipe that someone showed me.

I cut the eggplant into slices (about 1 / 4" thick), dipped the slices first into flour to lightly coat them, then dipped them into egg for another light coat, then dipped them into bread crumbs for a heavy coat.

Some slices I dipped into the egg and bread crumbs a second time.

Then I fried the slices in a pan on the stove in about 1/2" of olive oil for about 2 minutes per side to get them golden brown.

They were delicious and even my wife liked them. However, she asked if they could be baked instead of fried, to cut down on the oil.

So, that's my question - can the recipe or steps be adapted for baking in the oven? I figure I won't get that nice golden brown color on the bread crumbs.

Thanks.
Healthy Option?
Slice eggplants with skins 1/2 inch. Place slices on small amount (1/4 inch ) Tomato Sauce in oven dish of choice on the angle in the portion size you want...so three large slices or four medium per person ...space them out in portions . Grate  mozzerella over each individual portion ...grat parm also the same
Bake for 20 -30 minutes in convection preheated ..Take out and place on plate of  tomato sauce
My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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post #12 of 17

I like to grill the eggplant with some olive oil. Then use as you would the fried.

post #13 of 17

I agree with Siduri, and also IMO unless you well fry or whatever using the correct amount of oil the eggplant  will be vile.

post #14 of 17

SIDURI is 100% correct don't try to change it, just don't make it a lot or ""If it ain't broke, then don't fix it""" If I have to eat diet ice cream instead of the real thing, then don't give me ice cream.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #15 of 17

I like eggplant recipes and have not tried baking it since we don't usually prepare eggplants with ovens. Usually, we grill it, peel off the skin, mash it and make it into salad with hot coconut milk and some spices. It has same taste as when I fry the sliced eggplant. Usually, I can make 4-6 pieces in 1 eggplant depending on its length (we have longer and slender variety here). Never have to crowd the pieces as it may absorb the oil in seconds. You do not have to fry it for long, same as when you grill it so that is how the taste are same. I believe it also tastes same as when you bake it but do not mind about the color of the crumbs, it will surely not be same cause its not directed to heat on the pan.

~it's the heat that makes things crisp~
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~it's the heat that makes things crisp~
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post #16 of 17

I also have a suggestion and this is one of my favorite. It's like an eggplant omelet. I really love this. 

 

You could also try boiling the eggplant first until it's cooked. Then sauté some garlic, onions, tomatoes, ground pork and salt to taste. Then slice the boiled eggplants in the middle but don't cut it into two or you can just flatten them. Some people peel the skin of the eggplants but I don't coz I find it tastier. Put the sautéed ground pork on top of the boiled eggplants.  Then in another bowl, beat 2 eggs and season them with salt and pepper to taste. Then dip each eggplant into the beaten egg and fry them. That's it. It's good with ketchup as a dip. 

post #17 of 17

One of the few times my wife ever cooked for me she did a recipe for eggplant pitas. peel the eggplant cut into 2-3 inch wide strips drizzle with oil/salt/pepper and bake. the texture is more chewy then fried eggplant but the flavor was really pretty good. especially with the fixings that came with the recipe. I should try and find it.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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