or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rice Bran Oil

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Anyone try it? Using it regularly? Any comments?

Rice Bran Oil, Nutritional Data
post #2 of 12

Rice Bran Oil

I am so glad to see some chit chat about rice bran oil. It is my all time favorite oil for high heat cooking, salad dressings and baking. I like it because the smoke point is 490 and the taste is clean and light. I have enjoyed the health benefits.The oil has helped lower my cholesterol. I did a lot of research on it when a friend told me about it and now I am hooked.:roll:
post #3 of 12
Caution:
when it comes to rice bran, arsenic is a well known contaminate. Contaminated Rice coming from China and Bangladesh are often used as a cheap source of bran. This is a recent issue being raised about stabilized rice bran and oil.
If interested in reading more on this subject:
Rice bran contains high arsenic levels, study


Make sure you buy quality ingredients!
Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
post #4 of 12

Rice Oil

The Rice Oil I use comes from the California Rice Oil company. They told me their rice oil is not genetically modified. They do strict testing on their oil and they will give you the results if you ask them. I feel that rice oil is the best and healthiest choice for cooking and salads.:cool:
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
I don't buy any food products from China, and I don't buy from companies that I know buy food products from China.
post #6 of 12
I don't buy any food products from China, and I don't buy from companies that I know buy food products from China.
__________________
Shel

How do you know if product comes from China. If you buy a product that is blended or a combination of more then one ingredient it does not have to say made in China. If it says distributed by or marketed by nobody knows where it comes from. All it has to tell you is(is a warning) if it contains soy, peanuts,dairy etc.
Today evrything comes from all over example Toyota=Japanese car made or assembled in U.S., hubcaps made in mexico. all screws and some clamps made in China It is actually what I call a world car ,as are Fords and most others.
1 pound of chopped beef could be a blend of cattle imported from Spain, Japan and U.S. just go to FDA. website to check where they have allowed meat to be imported from.
Today you never know the real source of anything.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
I don't buy the things you've described, I don't buy ANY supermarket meat, fish, or poultry, not even for my cat. With the exception of some frozen Alaskan salmon, those items only come from known, local, and trusted sources. I check the origins on many items - for example, there is a major supplier of nuts to many organic groceries and many markets around here. I contacted the company and asked where the products I would buy came from. They were candid, and told me some of the items came from China. I replied that I will no longer buy ANYTHING from them, and found another source for my nuts.

There are country of origin labels on many items. An example is Trader Joe's products. I used to buy some canned beans from them, but when I discovered that those beans came from China, I stopped buying them. I now shop elsewhere for those beans, beans that I know are grown and produced in the US or Canada. And if that means I have to travel across town to get those beans, then I travel across town. And if I have to pay more to get those beans, then I'll pay more.

While I rarely eat frozen vegetables, I check the country of origin on the package before buying. When I found that even Whole Foods were selling Chinese vegetables, I stopped buying them. Fortunately, I get 99% of my vegetables fresh and from local farmers.

As for soy products, well, when I discovered that much of the soy comes from China, I looked for those products that I wanted that were grown and produced in the US.

If I can't find a product that I feel comfortable using - regardless of the reason - I just stop using it. Here's another example: There's a dairy here that used to be locally owned, and which has some pretty good products. Regardless, when I found out they are now owned by Dean Foods, a company whose practices I don't approve of, I just stopped buying any dairy products from that company. I now only buy dairy from two companies, plus some artisanal butter from a third. If the items from those companies are not available, I do without until they're back in stock or, if I must have them (a rarity), I'll travel to another store that may carry the item.

I don't buy chocolate from certain companies because of their politics and social stance. When I buy coffee, it's only fair trade coffee from certain producers. As much as I love Peet's coffee, I will only buy one or two blends from them, Peet's Las Hermanas is one.

If I'm not in the mood for Las Hermanas or the other blend (forget which that is), I'll go across the street and buy some Peruvian Fair Trade organic coffee,or down to the organic grocer that carries a good French roast.

In general, I don't buy national brands. I don't buy breakfast cereals in those boxes, like Cheerios or whatever; I don't buy cookies and snack foods from the supermarket, only from local bakeries that produce and sell goods of a certain quality. Bread? Only from the artisan bakers like Acme, La Farine, and a couple others. I haven't bought a packaged loaf in years with the exception of a local producer who makes some of the best whole grain breads around, and one special loaf every now and then from a bakery fifty mikes north. If I want ice cream, I eschew Ben & Jerry's and Haagen Das, and buy from local producers that use organic milk from pastured cows, like Straus Family Creamery.

I don't buy into your assertion assertion that "Today you never know the real source of anything." If you want to take the time, you can find the real source of many, many products. I KNOW where my milk comes from. I KNOW where my meat and poultry come from. I KNOW where my eggs come from - I can even tell you the name of the woman who gathers them. I KNOW who bakes my bread and where their flour comes from. I KNOW where my strawberries and tomatoes come from. I KNOW where my olive oil comes from - I talk to the woman who makes it. The list goes on ...

Anyway, I've rambled on too long ... my apolgies. It's just something I feel very strongly about. I just can't bring myself to eat questionable food and the cr#p that's found in most supermarkets markets.
post #8 of 12
I neither agree nor disagree with you . All am saying is it is very difficult to trace many sources. I worked in a place onetime where the GM told the chef where to buy from. He told the chef "Do not buy anything from Tyson Foods' as he had a friend who told him some of the things they do in processing. Only buy meat from IBP. I looked at him and said"Tyson Foods outright owns IBP" in fact they are not only chicken, but the largest beef operation in the country. He never told the chef where to buy again.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #9 of 12
I saw this thread and the arsenic comment and had to do some research. Rice bran is more susceptible to absorption of arsenic but all grains absorb it from the ground and probably all plants. Rice bran oil basically does not have any in it or no more than any other oil because it is in the bran not the oil and when they are separated it stays in the bran. I use rice oil regularly for frying and love it so that whole comment was pretty scary and thought all of you would like to know what I discovered. Craig O
post #10 of 12

Rice Oil

OK-I did some research as well since I use it all the time. The rice oil that I buy comes from Thailand which seems to be the only GMO free rice oil on the market. The company has testing and there is no arsenic in the oil. Sometimes it is good to go right to the company.:lips:
post #11 of 12

My investigation of 'California Rice Oil' is that it comes from Thailand.  If you investigate the company, you will find they own no farms nor rice processing facilities.  They have a license to import rice oil.  This is not well advertised, and I think they overcharge for this product giving the impression there is the sort of quality control that CA ag. industry exercises.  Not so.

post #12 of 12

would like to see craig-o's link or post data about rice oil being low in arsenic compared to rice bran.   I looked at the recent fda test data:  http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/UCM352467.pdf

 

brown rice and rice bran have high levels of arsenic.  California white rice appears to have lower levels than Arkansas, California, India and Pakistan basmati rice is fairly low.  By variety of white rice, longer grain has lower concentrations of arsenic.  I am going to stick with California long grained white rice, and hope the rice oil I buy from Arkansas has low arsenic; cannot find test results on rice oil.  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking