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avocado question

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I’m perusing recipes for avocado gazpacho.
Most call for two avocados, with out giving the variety.
I like Haas but have always preferred the “Florida” avocados, the ones that are now being marketed as the “slimcado”(smooth green skin and large in size). Florida avocados are huge in comparison to Haas.
Would it be reasonable to assume that a recipe calling for two avocados (probably meaning Haas or a similar variety) could yield similar results using one Florida avocado?
post #2 of 15
Since Avacados vary greatly in size, I think the recipe should have asked for a specific amount in cups or ounces, rather than saying a certain number of fruits. (and yes, it is a fruit...I'm sure we all know that). However, since they did say a number though, I think you would be in starting with only one large one. You can always put more in, if it needs it, but you cannot take it back out.

I think you might expect at least a little difference in the taste between the two varieties, and or various regions, owing to the the soil and growing conditions being different. Whether Haas are better than others I think would be a matter of individual taste. The main thing is to be sure they are ripe enough.
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post #3 of 15
I believe they're a Fuerte hybrid developed by Melissa. Ounce for ounce they have less fat and flavor than a Haas. As to your gazpacho -- if you want mild, use an ounce for ounce substitution. If you want an intensely avocado soup, you'd be better off increasing the Slimcado amount. Assuming one Slimcado supplies the same amount of flesh as two Haas, I'd use 1-1/2 Slimcados to replace 2 Haas, and save the remainder to slice and serve on tomorrow's toast.

One of the best things in the world is mashed avocado on sourdough English muffin with really good salmon roe.

BDL
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
I’m expecting a flavor and texture difference if I use the Florida because they naturally contain less oil and have a less “creamy” texture compared to Haas. I describe the Florida as having a slightly “brighter” flavor and Haas as being “muskier”. Which is just my subjective loo-loo take on the differences.

I guess I’m just seeking someone to grant me permission to act on my assumption that most recipes are going to assume “avocado” means Haas or a similar Mexican/Guatemalan hybrid versus the West Indian varieties that are commonly (at least around these here parts)called Florida and further that 2 Hass = 1 Florida.
So BDL, I am safe in my assumption about rough size equivalents but you suggest upping the amount of Florida/Slimcado to make up for the flavor difference?
post #5 of 15
In Indonesia, and probably some other places, avocados can be as big as a football. I think the variety or at least size should be specified.
post #6 of 15
I live in Florida and have avacado trees outside of my house. I can tell you that flavor and a creamier consistency. You will need a large Florida av. to derive the same amount of flavor that you get from 1 Haas.. Florida has a short growing season because its so hot . Tomatoes look great, so do strawberries and melons as well as mango and papaya but they lack flavor.Florida basil, I need 2 times the amount to make a decent pesto sauce. I find California is better source.
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post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Ed,
Being in Florida you are more familiar with the avocado of which I speak. I actually prefer the milder flavor of the big smooth green ones. I’m quirky that way. Like I said, I find Haas to have a musky attribute that I do not always find pleasant. And my DH prefers them because as a Miami native he grew up eating the ones off the tree in his sainted grandmother’s yard and if he is to be believed everything from Maymaw’s kitchen is the pinnacle of perfection and the standard to which all things must adhere. (I’ve spent years trying to replicate Maymaw’s chicken and dumplings from his description alone, given that she’s been gone since before I was born. It’s been a difficult task and I’m glad to report that I’m almost there.)


So general consensus seems to be 2 Haas = 1 Florida in volume and 1 Haas = 1 Florida in flavor. Is that about right?

If I plan on using a recipe for avocado gazpacho that calls for 2 Haas, I should use at least one Florida (for volume which was my original question) but it is being recommended that I use more to oomph the avocado flavor.

Having never made gazpacho at all, I then need to ask what will the additional avocado volume (if not flavor) do to the balance of the soup?

I just live to make things complicated.:rolleyes:
post #8 of 15
California hothouse, Hydroponic avocados are really sweet. Not organic but nice for sauces and soups. Like a hass but HUGE!:talk:
post #9 of 15
Take it from Lard Country. Just joking, I do find the city name Manteca interesting.
post #10 of 15
Interesting it is! I love lard!:D
post #11 of 15
Iz,

Not only new to this gazpacho, but new to gazpacho, generally? Well, whatever. I smell new recipe anxiety. It would be a good idea to let it go and remember what a good cook you are. I'd get the texture first; then tweak the avocado flavor with a combination of diced avocado added after the soup is blended and those perennial avocado tweakers -- lemon and salt.

Your palate is such that if you taste and adjust, whatever was wrong will be fixed.

BDL
post #12 of 15
Word!:chef:


I made a watermelon gazpacho a few weeks ago. KILLER!!!!
post #13 of 15
I would love to have recipe for watermelon gazpacho for my files
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post #14 of 15
I also would love to see a recipe for watermelon gazpacho!!
post #15 of 15
Izbnso - if you get the opportunity, why not try it first with one, exact same other ingredients and process, then with same quantity of the other, same way.

You may find you prefer one or the other, or think a mix between both would be good.

Like any recipe, it takes some practice, good luck!

Let us know :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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