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Horseradish, how do you feel about it?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
This is sort of an open ended subject I am reaching out to all you professionals. I want to know anything and everything you know about horseradish.

Questions I'll raise:
What kind of recipes do you love to incorporate horseradish in?
What food group do you consider horseradish?
Is it an indulgent food in your opinion, how would you describe the flavor?

These are just a few thoughts, but I would like to hear how your taste buds feel! I want you to spill your feelings and to really help me understand the significance of horseradish in your cooking.
post #2 of 22
How do I feel about horseradish?
...that putting a small piece of fresh HR in your blender is the best way to rid yourself of annoying guests.

No really, I love the stuff-so much so that something possessed me to plant a small little plant in my herb garden. Four years later, I'm yanking it out like weeds.

I dug up one of the large roots, well, most of it anyway-I think the roots actually reach to the center of the earth. I then launched into putting by some grated horseradish for my use in future dishes. After washing it and peeling the skin (tears, tears, tears) I cut it in chunks and ran it through the fine grater attachment on my food processor.

OMG! We almost had to call the Hazmat crew!!! I thought my eyes were going to melt out of my head!:eek:

I donned my husband's gas mask (the one Bear Stearns issued after 9/11/01) and was finally able to finish the job. I now have about 2 quarts of grated horseradish in my freezer.

Even though I had difficulty bringing myself to use it after that ordeal, I like making HR butter for roast beef and steaks. It's also good mixed with bread crumbs and patted on meaty fish (like grouper) and sauteed for a crispy coating-delicious. Needless to say, it makes Bloody Marys especially kickin!

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post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

Brought me to tears!

Thanks so much for your "tearful" input. The reason I am reaching out and asking about horseradish is this: I am a graphic design student and I am current working on a re-branding campaign for Long's Horseradish. I am focusing primarily on the aspect of the product being pure in nature, and focusing much of the advertising on "foodies". So if your a foodie, this campaign is for you!

I wanted to get some actual feedback from the people I will be advertising to and hear what kind of things they would actually like to see in a horseradish campaign if you will. Because I have seen some interest in the subject, let me pose my next question:

For you as someone who loves food and horseradish of course, would you describe this condiment as indulgent? I am searching for the proper term to help bring home the gourmet aspect of horseradish, without using the very cliche word of gourmet itself. Can you help me with some descriptive words?

I want to make this as much about the foodie and the culture as possible, and who knows I might be chosen to go forth and represent this company in actual print ads, packaging, etc.

Your comments much appreciated!
post #4 of 22
I don't think I would describe horseradish as "indulgent". In fact, for me, in conjures up the opposite. It seems like a condiment of the common man. Something to accompany sausages, roasts, etc., foods that scream more of pracitcality than indulgence. Don't get me wrong. I love horseradish. My fridge is never without it, and it gets used often so what I say is not a bad thing.
post #5 of 22
I'm Belarusian, and live in a polish, ukranian, belarusian town.....

If I didn't eat horseradish, the kind that grew out back and made your ears bleed when you ate it..at age 5, my parents would have disowned me.

I eat it a lot. I love it. hotter the better for me...nothing like easter ham, horseradish and fresh rye bread....
post #6 of 22
No, I wouldn't call horseradish "indulgent."

Assertive, kickin', bright, robust, potent, sharp, brilliant, pungent, vivid, piquant, biting, spicy, aromatic, lively, peppery, pungent, snappy, stinging, zesty, provocative, harsh, rash, sharp, defined, intense, piercing, fierce, fiery, incisive, acute, cutting, caustic

Have you eaten horseradish before?

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Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #7 of 22
Im not understanding how it can be perceived as indulgent??
Where heat with real strength of character is needed, its the ideal ingredient.

We had venison casserole recently and horseradish was essential. Game or really good beef are made for it.
You do need to be careful not to overdo it though

Likewise, Wasabi, which is considered the Japanese version . Sushi just wouldnt be the same without it
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #8 of 22
I love horseradish, it can certainly beef up the flavor of your meal, especially if it involves beef. I love it on corned beef, pastrami sandwiches. I hate going to some restaurant and getting prime rib with 'horseradish sauce' where they mix maybe a teaspoon of it in a gallon of sour cream - that's for wimps, I want the REAL stuff! And I want to taste it in the cocktail sauce for the shrimp - maybe that one is a bit indulgent.

Bratwurst, hot dogs, etc. need to have a good mix of decent mustard and horseradish on them. Well, unless you're having a Chicago dog, which is a different story. Have you ever tried dipping a slice of swiss cheese into some prepared horseradish? Fold a blob of it into your scrambled eggs? Stir a spoonful or two into your beef stew or pot roast? Potato salad? Horseradish is a fairly versatile vegetable, though I wouldn't put it on ice cream or in my coffee.

Gee, now that I'm thinking about it, I don't recall ever using it on any chicken dishes. Hmmm....

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #9 of 22
Good horseradish is ... Good Eats!

By good horseradish I mean no cream sauces, fillers, preservatives, chemicals ...

I don't eat it often, but when I do it's gotta be the straight and powerful stuff. I'm with teamfat on this.

I love it on gefilte fish - I grew up with it on gefilte fish. My cousins and I would have horseradish eating contests at the Passover table. We'd have some strong stuff, and the six of us would try to outdo one another in the amount we'd eat.



It's good on roast beef sandwiches, too.

California grows and processes a lot of horseradish, and there are a few good brands here that are excellent. My uncle Irv makes his own - mmmm! I've not tried that yet. Someday ...
post #10 of 22
Indulgent. Yes. And buttery. Nearest thing to chocolate. Don't forget "meltingly tender." Are you nuts? The only sense indulged is masochism.

The palate knows horseradish as half delayed gratification and half sidekick. In exchange for a little pain, things taste better. Oh, and let's not forget the half humor of tears and clear sinuses.

Twisted sensuality works far better than a girl-food buzzword as the hook for your campaign. Horseradish hurts, but it hurts so good.

BDL
post #11 of 22
All of the above - great with meat - great for clearing the sinuses too. Love it with corned silverside, a touch mixed in with mashed potato. Also (surprisingly) teams well with a savoury banana salad when you mix some into some sour cream and toss it all together.

Works well with beetroot, smoked fish/ eel.

I guess its just a vegetable, as far as what food group it would be classed as.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 22
Ha! I've used it like that too, opening a jar and inhaling deeply. The stuff I use is pretty strong, yowza!
post #13 of 22
I’ve had a miserable two days, complete with a root canal, I want to thank you for the best laugh I’ve had all week.
post #14 of 22
I love horseradish and it is hard to find the root here. I may plant some next year in the garden. The only thing worse than grinding horseradish is when I grind habenero to make chili powder :lol: that will really open the sinuses!
post #15 of 22
I like to take the blender, or the processor, or the stand mixer with the grinder attachment outside when I do horseradish. The fumes can really hurt you.

I find one use for horseradish is in a sourcream/ horseradish/ dill dressing for cucumber salad; and, with a slightly different balance, as a sauce for salmon.

Oddly, this sort Scandinavian accented cucumber salad is something I associate with barbecue, having spent some of my childhood in the valleys around Solvang. At the deepest "comfort food" level, barbecue means Caesar salad; a 2" or 3" top sirloin cooked medium rare over an open pit burning live oak; sourdough bread; pinquito beans (cooked Mexican style -- de la olla); and the aforementioned cucumber salad. I know the Southerners are cringin, but that's how we've done it out here since forever.

The salmon thing is self explanatory.

For beef, I like to fold a lot of horseradish into a little bit of whipped cream; or mix it with a hot mustard, creme fraiche and green peppercorns.

BDL
post #16 of 22
I use it in barbecue sauce, baked beans and deviled eggs, among other things. Think of it as American wasabi, because that's what it is. I would classify it as a root vegetable although it's used as a condiment. It seems less lethal to process if you use an old fashioned crank grinder that clamps to the table. I know people that spend the summer scoping rummage sales for food processors and blenders just for horseradish season because they wreck several in the grinding process. It grows wild around here, but I haven't dug any for years. Wonder what would happen if you roasted a whole root? Hmm, might have to try it. Throw a root in with a beef roast. Anyone ever tried this? (I'm sure someone has.)
post #17 of 22
My favorite commercial horseradish makes a wasabi-horseradish blend. I've never tried it - it's new - so can't speak to the ingredients or quality.

Beaverton Foods - Horseradish
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

We want you!

We want you! Best answer I have heard so far. And I bet your thinking, does she still think it is "indulgent"? No. We have completely erased that from our minds. We should have known better. Were going on a more powerful direction. Thanks to you we had brillant ideas, and a really good laugh. I really appreciate it!
post #19 of 22
My cousins and I would have horseradish eating contests at the Passover table. We'd have some strong stuff, and the six of us would try to outdo one another in the amount we'd eat.


Ah...the Atomic Horseradish (the pinkish stuff)...is the BEST for eating shmeered on Matzo. My spousal unit takes her Matzo, spreads on some Atomic Horseradish, tops it with peanut butter and eats the whole thing up. She just luvs the stuff. Me...I love it on sandwiches (i.e. the Horsey sauce consistancy)...or shmeered under something sweet. When we make Matzo Pizza(s), we mix it with the sauce and then layer mozzarella cheese on top...place in toaster oven until melted, and then "FEASTTTTT"...mmmmm:chef:
Cantor Posner aka ChefBoyof Dees

"An Armed Society is a Polite Society"--Robert A Heinlein

"You either Do or Don't Do...There is no TRY" --Yodah
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Cantor Posner aka ChefBoyof Dees

"An Armed Society is a Polite Society"--Robert A Heinlein

"You either Do or Don't Do...There is no TRY" --Yodah
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post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Another Question to Raise...

If you could create your own personal fountain of youth, what 5 things would you bring?

What things are your idea to a key to a long life?

What food products do you feel extend your life? Doesnt necessarily have to be healthy in the conventional way, just something that makes your life complete.

...Now keep in mind, horseradish has to be one of these things. Whatever your impression is to the question, I want to know!
post #21 of 22

Horseradish is sort of a vegetable condiment because it has roots, but is usually used on the side of an entree.  I love it with baked, smoked ham and my boyfriend and I love it in a sauce to dip prime rib in - fantastic.  Our neighbor was just diriving down the road, saw the roots in a farm field, and the farmer actually gave her about 20 lbs of the stuff for free!  She doesn't know what to charge for it if she sells it, but I think it's pretty expensive.  She took it all outside, peeled it with a carrot peeler and put it in the food processor.  I added about a cup of white vingar and a tsp of salt to the almost full quart she gave us, and am letting it sit a few days before using it.

Indulgent is the right idea about horseradish, but not the right word.  I would say it's more "sassy" or something like that!

post #22 of 22

horseradish.... and whole grain mustard.... on smoked coffee rub prime rib is the cornerstone of sunday morning before a brunch shift. not to mention a few marlboro reds

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