or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Potato Gnocchi - How to get just a LITTLE more fluffy/light
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Potato Gnocchi - How to get just a LITTLE more fluffy/light

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
2 decent sized russets - baked, peeled, then riced

Added a large egg yolk

2tbs butter

and about 1 cup flour....

worked it for a little bit, rolled out, cut, then sauteed a little under medium heat in some duck fat.

amazing tasting, but I'm trying to recreate a dish from our favourite restaurant and thiers is just a little lighter, almost melts in your mouth, like it's filled with air.






don't get me wrong, they were very light and fluffy, but still not my 4-star joint.

input? neeeeeeed innnnpuuuuttt.....
post #2 of 28
RPM,

They look great. To make them lighter, two, maybe three, things: First, cut the flour by about 1/4 or 1/3. As little flour as you can get by with and still have them hold together. Second, when you make the dough, treat them like biscuits or pie crust -- "work" as little as possible. The optional third is to poach until they rise up to the surface, before draining, drying and browning.

BDL
post #3 of 28
RPMc,

When are we having potato gnocchi again? :bounce:
What else did you prepare to go with the potato gnocchi? Any plating pictures to go with it?
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Seared duck breast with a little redwine pan sauce and sauteed spinach, nothing special....



I know I know, this is NRatcheds plate, she likes her duck a little (a lot) more cooked than I do. :rolleyes:
post #5 of 28
As BDL said.....less flour.....perhaps omit the butter and use just a little
EVOO.......you might try using OO flour as well....the trick is to use as little
flour as possible.....and to work just enough to incorporate into a smooth mixture that will roll out....You don't have to brown them either....once the float remove and add to sauce....good luck.....
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
thanks!

any suggestions for a sauce? At the restaurant I am trying to replicate they serve a little dish with the gnocchi, sugar snap peas and braised artichoke, but not sure the sauce. but it's heaven on a plate.

I'm going to try again today as, i think as it was pretty easy, and think i can nail it. I'm real close.

I like them a LITTLE browned or crispy.
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
The gnocchi at Nicholas (the restaurant I oggle over) is on the menu as Parisienne Gnocchi, but I'm quite sure it has potato. (although maybe not?)

As i posted about in my blog, should I continue to try and replicate with a pate a choux/parisienne method (something like Fotocuisine Blog Archive Gnocchi Parisienne with Vegetables) ....or just make "mine" better :D

i mean, duck fat makes everything better! although I may try a quick poach with my method and less flour first.
post #8 of 28
As far as sauces go......Pomodoro with grated Ricotta Salate over the top or
Cream, Gorganzola, and Speck......being lactose intolerant, I go with the first suggestion most of the time....they are great with pesto, or a duck ragu even. Believe it or not...they freeze well also.....dust them down with a little flour and semolina....freeze them on a sheet pan.....store them iqf in ziplocs.
Pop them in the water frozen.....good luck.....
post #9 of 28
Parisian gnocchi is simply choux-paste, there's typically no potato in it (unless you want to make a variation).
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
yep, that's what my research tells me too, however for some strange reason I think that the one at my fav restaurant does...I've had it a few times, and remember them explaining it, heck, sat in the kitchen while they were making it, but it was after a bottle of wine. :lol:
post #11 of 28
Try putting your gnocchi together by cutting all the ingredients together with two bench knives--it's loud, but it's a great way to get out some aggression without overworking the dough. :) Don't use them to smear the dough, just to cut straight down through it. I agree with cutting down a bit on the flour and/or using 00 flour.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #12 of 28
What makes them light as air is ... (wait for it) air.

When you make the dumplings, what you want to do is create (or leave) air pockets. When the dumplings are cooked the first time the air heats up and expands and the dumplings get larger and light.

Choux paste and potato gnocchi both rely on turning their internal moisture into steam to open the structure. Choux paste relies on a lot of fat to surround each grain of flour; while potato gnocchi use the structure of the potato. That's why it's important not to overwork them. With potato gnocchi it's important not to put too much flour in because it dries them out and the steam can't work it's magic.

You poach first, in order to form the steam which expands the dumplings. BTW, that's why dumplings float. When they swell -- they displace a greater mass of water than their own weight and become bouyant as a result.

Jenni's board knife method sounds like fun. I usually use the volcano with two forks or just paws.

BDL
post #13 of 28
It all depends on what you're into, BDL! Seriously, this is a technique that all of our cooks were required to learn (because our chef had learned it that way, of course). It does make for a really light gnocchi. As far as I know, the technique came from Bacchanalia in Atlanta, but I'm sure it could be traced back farther than that.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #14 of 28
I'm sure it can be. Sounds very old country. I doubt it's much different from two fork or two knife cutting in. What I like about the volcano/hand method is absolute control over the amount of flour. The downside I guess, is the dough takes some working. I try to make up for it by rolling out the snakes a very soft touch. Always seeking that balance.

You do realize that in two months RPM is going to be kicking our butts on this, don't you? The guy is a monster; I'm not sure we should be giving him more advice.

BDL
post #15 of 28
We're tough (but not our gnocchi); we can take it!:roll:
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
hey hey hey...that's not fair! :crazy:

In turn, I offer if anyone has any questions regarding Motorcycles (vintage), pre1965 cars, auto-pinstriping and art, or computer security, I'd surely call myself an expert and professional in all of the above!! haha.

I can build from scratch a 1939 Harley motor with 80" flywheels, and have it tour the country at 80mph all day....AND make the covers of magazines...(have ya SEEN my garage?!)

...but I'll be damned if I don't know how to make chicken stock :lol:
post #17 of 28
I can't offer up the knowledge or experience of the previous posters. But I will include a link to an article that has helped me make vast improvements in my potato gnocchi. I was amazed at how light and airy these little pillows could be. Of the flour in the recipe I would use as little as I could get away with.

A master chef's take on potato gnocchi, by Tom Colicchio N.Y. Times News Service

EDIT ADD: This is the link I meant to include. It's an article from the SFGate


take care,
dan
post #18 of 28
I've never used butter in mine, maybe that could help. Don't work it too much. What I do is cook in boiling salted water until it floats, shock it, then freeze them individually and put in seperate baggies. Then when an order comes in, saute those bad boys. I personally have to have my gnocchi browned, just a personal preference though. I like mine with brown butter and sage or bolognese, especially the bolognese. Rich as a you know what but tasty. Also, if your a big fan of gnocchi, try making different versions of it. Sweet potato, ricotta, goat cheese, use spinach or roasted red peppers, maybe some beets. You could make them bigger or smaller. Once you get the hang of gnocchi, its pretty easy to manipulate into different things.
post #19 of 28
They look great, but I'd be tempted to ditch the egg yolk. Tends to make them heavier than it sounds you wouldl ike them to be.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #20 of 28
Hey even stephen, You'll get a kick outta this. I can remember back in Atl having been to VVV when you worked there and having the gnocci. Outstanding dish in a sage brown butter sauce. One of my favorite ways of eating the dish too.

Personally I like the dish in a sauce so I can taste the gnocci. Most hearty sauces weigh down things to the pallette. Ragu's allbeit more hearty are a good option when used in moderation.

RP, As far as the question of making them more tender, light and fluffy...... I'm not sure if it's been mentioned yet but......personally have never used a baked potato. Usually steamed or boiled then riced. I think that a baked potato can be light and fluffy right out of the oven but as they sit they become too dense. Where as a boiled or steamed potato doesn't seem to get as dense.

I've noticed this in something as basic as a potato salad. Not trying to shift the conversation but when I use baked potatoes instead of steamed or boiled, they hold together better. That said I would follow the advice on working the dough like a pastry dough and try the potatoes boiled or steamed.

It's been a long time since I've made gnocci so........ :D
post #21 of 28
Old,

Bringing up "how to cook the potato," was a good add-on to the discussion. I've heard recommendations for both baked and boiled. I hate to admit it, but my best luck has been with the micro-nuke.

On a related but slightly different tack -- can we all agree on Russets/Idaho dry baking type potatoes? I think we can.

RPM -- the whole moisture/ how you cook / what type of potato thing is related to managing the moisture with flour. And as has been said, the less flour, the better.

BDL
post #22 of 28
I prefer boiling, peeling, food mill.......something about boiling them, seems
to make them lighter....another point of interest.....never let the potatoes cool down below moderate room temperture.......mill them hot, spread them out on a sheet pan......
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm going to give it another shot tonight, I have a pork belly braising in the oven.....and 2 pots of stock on the stove :)
post #24 of 28
:bounce: :bounce: I can't wait for the pictures!!!!!!
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 
JBD check out my "stock" pictures in the recipes section...or if you want to cheat.

rtimko : photos : Cooking- powered by SmugMug

but the stock post is better.....

everything is still cooking. camera battery is on charge too...only thing to do now is listen to some tunes, (billy joel today) and drink my drink of choice....old-fashioneds with Sazerac rye.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Ok gave it another try....nuke/baked potato, just like last time....and just enough flour to keep it together....and poached....till they floated (that was fun, like fishing!) and I sauteed in butter (probably too much butter) came out mushy. last recipe was better so I think I'll stick with that.


















they were OK, but not as good as last time. no worries though, perhaps I'll just try poaching the first recipe first and see how that works out.



other dish is Braised pork belly over shallot-ginger confit type thing...not very good either...but...that's another post HERE!
post #27 of 28
I'm probably going to get flamed for this but I don't know about this gnocchi. I'm curious as to making it, the step mom likes it but I was wondering about a fluffier and softer flour instead of all purpose. As well as egg white. Why wouldn't those work? Any good recipes? Sauces? Need vegetarian, step mom is a weirdo.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
Reply
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
Reply
post #28 of 28
I'll stick to making matzoh balls, less of a hastle
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Potato Gnocchi - How to get just a LITTLE more fluffy/light