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Italian savory Pies

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
These are called Enjou. I'm not sure of the spelling but I have mentioned them a couple times before in other posts. Being as my Fathers side of the family is from Southern Italy and my Grandmother broght this knowledge with her when she arrived here in the 1920's I'd ahve to say they are a form of pie that is served in southern Italy.

Basically these are made with Swiss Chard but they can be made with curly leaf spinach as an alternative. The spinach is mixed with salt, squeezed dry as can be and then combined with olive oil, crushed red pepper (in this case ground Arbol peppers), garlic (either fresh chopped or powder) and paprika.

The dough is a form of basic Italian pastry for this application. Flour, Leaf lard, salt, dry yeast and water.

Here is a pic of the end product. The majority of things are the Enjou but there are two pepper breads that are on the inner and upper left corner. They closly resemble a jelly roll but have peppers and tomatoes with basil and garlic in place of the jelly. Another food that hasn't been made in close to 30 years in my family.


I decided to make these in honor of my family reunion this weekend. All the folks that are coming grew up on these so it will hopefully be a treat. If ya'll ahve been following some of the posts on threads I've started in recent months it's all be about getting things rolling or some practice in on the family favorites.:lips::smiles: So far so good. Even took a stab at Vintnering some wine last week. It has mellowed very nicely over the last week.

As far as tonights project went, I gotta say it's good thing the DW had experience with making these. It was about 10 years ago but she was still a valuable asset if getting things done. SOSDD as far as my end of things but it was fun making them. I just have to survive physically over the next 7 days and we're good to go.;):cool:
And of course one (actually two) nedded to be scrificed for the interst of taste. :rolleyes:;):D


The recipe is one of those that's written in the "about this, pinch of this dash of that, almost" format so I really can't provide anything. It also something that has been passed down over the years and I'm not sure how the family would feel about it getting out so I do apologize for not providing it.
post #2 of 15
Looks good.

Reading the recipe and seeing the pic, it seems like a cross between a calzone and an empanada.
post #3 of 15
Those look really nice.
What part of italy did your grandmother come from, oldschool? I've seen these made with swiss chard, pinoli, raisins, garlic and gaeta olives in an olive oil crust, made by my mother-in-law from southeastern lazio. Instead in the area around naples they make them with escarole. I can';t imagine what word enjou could actually be in italian.
Enjoy your reunion.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #4 of 15

great

This is really a great post.
Thanks for sharing
post #5 of 15
Beautiful! enjoy your family reunion.....so cool that you are making family favorites to pass along.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 15
Seen these before years ago in some places in Brooklyn. Never ate one, but I remember that there were different varieties. When the man told me danderloin. pine nuts and cheese, I passed and settled for regular calzone with marinara sauce. Great idea going back in time with family favorites. Have fun!!!!
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks gang!

Siduri, I've only heard them called that. It's almost pronounced like au jus but with "au" being replaced by the "en". Only it sounds like your saying a cross between un and on. That side of the family is from the Village of Alexandra del Coretta ( or Corette again with the spelling I'm not sure) in Calabria.

Swiss Chard is specifically used in my family but Spinach was given as a substitute for times when it was scarce. She would normally put currants or raisins in the pie but began to eliminate those for the newer tastes (myself, brother and cousins) in the family.

It is similar to a calzone but the dough is all pastry. It does also have eggs in it which I seem to have forgotten to mention in the original post. Plus no cheeses at all in the mix since being in southern Italy, dairy was not as plentiful as the more northern exposures. Again how it was explained to me so long ago.

I'll try and get a cross-section of both the pies and pepper bread. I just could get to it last night. For one, things cut and appear better when cooled and two....I had a hard enough time holding the camera to take the shot I did.

Later gang and thanks again.
post #8 of 15
They are gorgeous, old school, thanks for posting!

I have lots of bieda (sp?) in the garden, I haven't been all that inspired to use it, now I will have to try something like those. No schkarol though to make the Napolitan ones.

:cool:
post #9 of 15

do you deliver?

nice, old school..that's a labor of love for sure..nice kitchen too! i think it is so very, very important that we keep our heritages alive through cooking, sharing food, and preserving recipes..my sicilian grandmother wrote down her recipes always using the same 'pinch of this' method as well...but all the recipes are in italian!!! have a glorious time with your famiglia
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #10 of 15
Chard, pine nuts and raisins is an old regional Catalonian combination. Coincidence? Probably.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #11 of 15
i remember eating pasta as a child with raisins, pine nuts, butter and fresh parmeggiano..simply nirvana...i tried putting it on our kids menu when we had an italian restaurant here..couldn't give it away...go figure! but our tourist base is pure texan..they just like ranch dressing.... on everything!

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #12 of 15
Possibly not. There were spanish kings in naples for many centuries, and there are plenty of spanish influences there. Not to mention of course, the french influences, mainly seen in "catto' di patate" (gateau) and in pastries like baba' and brioche.
Or possibly yes, since swiss chard goes so well with pine nuts and raisins.
Actually much medieval cooking had salty and sweet (mincemeat pie, as tyou know, was once with real meat and raisins and other sweet stuff, and there's a flat tart from romagna with spinach and sugar and raisins).
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
As I promised I have a cross section shot (well sort of). Not exactly the angle I wanted but it's not possible for me to get at that angle for the moment.





As soon as I get the chance I'll replace these with better pictures. ;)

Thanks for all the kind words too.:cool:
post #14 of 15
never saw anything like the pepper bread. looks great
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #15 of 15
This sounds delicious. You know I often find that kids' menus are so limited in restaurants and we definitely need a change. I would never allow my child to order from one. If I really wanted to push this dish I would serve it as complimentary to each person ordering an entree or as an appetizer. I've seen this done at restaurants - they'll bring me amazing hush puppies and then a month later they are suddenly on the menu, not complimentary, and I'll order them.

Nothing against ranch - love the stuff. Anyone on the boards here from Texas?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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