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Manufacturing Cream - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Thread Starter 
There is. Michael Pollan said it in just seven words, "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."

http://www.michaelpollan.com/article.php?id=87

Try not to buy food that has labels, or at least that doesn't have labels with polysyllabic words that require a dictionary or a chemistry degree to understand.
post #32 of 47
I guess you win. Don't let me bother you with your different meanings according to context. Is it possible that you aren't purer than I am?
post #33 of 47
Check out the Slow Food movement if you are not already aware of it.

Organizations – Slow Food


They embrace some of the food philosophies expressed in this thread.

If I wasn't such an old grouch and liked being around kids more, I'd probably volunteer for their Taste Education program for elementery schools.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #34 of 47
Thread Starter 
There was a big Slow Food Nation event in San Francisco Aug 29 - Sept 1 and it appears that similar events have taken place worldwide

http://slowfoodnation.org/ It was almost impossible to be living in the SF Bay Area and not be aware of the event ... and to have been aware of the movement these past years.
post #35 of 47
Where can I find real, unadulterated double and single cream in Montreal or Westmount?
post #36 of 47

An ancient thread but it raises the issue of oil drops.  If you are still here, does anyone know where and why oil drops occur?

 

I have raw cream which I suspect is actually manufacturing cream, i.e., it's almost butter, and oil drops are present when it's added to coffee.

 

I'm leaning strongly towards adjusting my Milky Cream Separator so as to thin the cream but I'm not sure how far to thin it.

 

How thick do you like your cream?  Isn't manufacturing cream really too thick to utilize in many if not most applications, e.g., pouring over fruit or cereal, etc.?

 

Thank you.

post #37 of 47

I use manufacturing cream for any heavy cream application.  Have never experienced these "oil drops".

post #38 of 47

I've never encountered "manufacturing cream."  

 

Is it available in any retail setting?  I really don't need a 55-gallon drum of it, but I'd like the chance to play around with an ingredient that sounds to be significantly different from the regular commercial products.

 

Thanks for any suggestions.

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #39 of 47

In my area it is produced/marketed by Alta Dena Dairy in half gallons, and sold at Smart & Final stores.

post #40 of 47
@shire, fat that isn't homogonized into your cream welt melt when added to your coffee.
post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

@shire, fat that isn't homogonized into your cream welt melt when added to your coffee.


My cream is raw.  Nothing is homogenized.  So, are you saying the oil drops are melted fat from my raw cream?

 

And my raw cream comes from Jersey cows which have a very high butterfat content.  I wonder if thinner cream, i.e., something less than manufacturing cream but still raw cream produces oil drops?

post #42 of 47
As long you still have those globs of fat it will
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

As long you still have those globs of fat it will


I was thinking 'globules.'

 

'A small globe or ball'

 

Are those globs controllable or don't they just occur naturally as a component of raw cream?

post #44 of 47
Thats the natural fat from the milk that would theoretically become butter. I guess you could control it by using lower fat milk? I don't work with raw cream but can buy heavy cream i have tto let warm up before i open because the fat clogs the bottle- thats where i've seen this before.
post #45 of 47

Maybe a science perspective will help answer the oil drops question:

Background info (long answer): raw whole milk is comprised of water, lactose (sugar), water loving proteins, fat loving proteins and both water & fat loving proteins.

when left standing raw milk separates to cream and milk.  The cream is on top because oil/fat is lighter than water particularly water weighted with sugar (i.e. lower fat milk at the bottom).

The natural use of milk is to feed an infant a somewhat homogenous blend of nutrients (carbohydrates, protein and fat) and calories to sustain growth (yes also hormones and antigens which are essentially a class of proteins as well).  The evolution of mammary milk production was not meant for milk to be stored but to be consummed as needed (i.e. suckling).

That said, when milk is excreted, fat loving proteins englobe oil/fat droplets into micelles (tiny microscopic beads of fat).  These micelles can somewhat remain in solution because fat&water loving proteins act as emulsifiers (soap)... like dissolving oil with soap when washing dishes.  The purpose of this is so that fat can be easily dispersed in the milk for nutrient consistency as consumed.

 

quick answer: Cream skimmed off the top of milk has large micelles that coalesce into larger micelles of fat and can grow to become visible oil drops. When heated proteins lose their ability to emulsify and bind to fat hence why oil drops often appear on top of hot coffee. Homogenizing cream or milk mechanically (violently) breaks down the size of the micelles to the point they don't float to the top anymore which can minimize oil drops from appearing. Homogenized whole milk does not seperate.  When gums are added (carrageenan, locust bean and guar gum) it thickens the water that further prevents fat from rising.  Fat loving ingredients (polysorbate 80 and mono and di glycerides) makes the fat more liquid and easily to remain in suspension.  the purpose is to prevent the micelles from breakdown and releasing its fat to coalesce into oil drops when heated.

When cream is slowly beaten (particularly using cool temperature), the fat micelles merge, solidify and become butter fat (i.e. butter).

 

Hope this helps?

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 

Maybe a science perspective will help answer the oil drops question:

Background info (long answer): raw whole milk is comprised of water, lactose (sugar), water loving proteins, fat loving proteins and both water & fat loving proteins.

when left standing raw milk separates to cream and milk.  The cream is on top because oil/fat is lighter than water particularly water weighted with sugar (i.e. lower fat milk at the bottom).

The natural use of milk is to feed an infant a somewhat homogenous blend of nutrients (carbohydrates, protein and fat) and calories to sustain growth (yes also hormones and antigens which are essentially a class of proteins as well).  The evolution of mammary milk production was not meant for milk to be stored but to be consummed as needed (i.e. suckling).

That said, when milk is excreted, fat loving proteins englobe oil/fat droplets into micelles (tiny microscopic beads of fat).  These micelles can somewhat remain in solution because fat&water loving proteins act as emulsifiers (soap)... like dissolving oil with soap when washing dishes.  The purpose of this is so that fat can be easily dispersed in the milk for nutrient consistency as consumed.

 

quick answer: Cream skimmed off the top of milk has large micelles that coalesce into larger micelles of fat and can grow to become visible oil drops. When heated proteins lose their ability to emulsify and bind to fat hence why oil drops often appear on top of hot coffee. Homogenizing cream or milk mechanically (violently) breaks down the size of the micelles to the point they don't float to the top anymore which can minimize oil drops from appearing. Homogenized whole milk does not seperate.  When gums are added (carrageenan, locust bean and guar gum) it thickens the water that further prevents fat from rising.  Fat loving ingredients (polysorbate 80 and mono and di glycerides) makes the fat more liquid and easily to remain in suspension.  the purpose is to prevent the micelles from breakdown and releasing its fat to coalesce into oil drops when heated.

When cream is slowly beaten (particularly using cool temperature), the fat micelles merge, solidify and become butter fat (i.e. butter).

 

Hope this helps?

 

Luc H.


Most excellent!  If presented the choice of cream types which would you opt for:

 

·  Whipping cream: made specifically for whipping, contains 30-36% milk fat. Often contains stabilizers and emulsifiers to ensure it keeps and holds its form when being whipped.

·  Raw Heavy cream: also called heavy whipping cream, has a fat content between 36-40%.

·  Raw Manufacturing cream: has a fat content over 40%, and is generally not available in retail stores. It is primarily used in professional food service.

And if you prefer the manufacturing cream that requires that you use a spoon as opposed to being able to pour the cream, why isn't that a negative?  Wouldn't you prefer cream that is pourable as opposed to cream that requires a spoon to dispense?

 

Thank you.

post #47 of 47

If I was faced with many choices of creams, I would choose according to the intended use, look and feel.

examples:

whipping creams (retail) with additives are stable in coffee, taste ok, and whip up stiff with less fat.

Raw heavy cream is great to pour over berries and soups

Raw manufacturing cream whips up stiff and has tons of flavour and mouthfeel, also perfect to make crème fraîche.

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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