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Beer Pickles

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thought I would share a recipe that I make every summer for friends. I got the name when a friend said these pickles go very well with beer.

Basic brine:
1 part water
2 parts white vinegar

Combine the water and vinegar in a stainless or other non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil and add salt until it won't dissolve (you can cut back on the salt if you must).

While this comes to a boil pack sliced cucumbers, onions, and garlic(I use 4-5 smashed cloves per quart jar) into clean sterilized canning jars. Add the brine, cap, and once cool refrigerate. These must be kept cold, they are not processed! Let age for 3-4 weeks and enjoy in moderation.
post #2 of 10
These are great, I make a batch or two myself every summer, I refer to them as fresh pickles. It also works well for green tomato slices instead of or in addition to the cukes. Sometimes I add a sprig or two of fresh dill, sometimes I'll blanch a hot chile pepper or two in the boiling brine before tossing it all in the jar.

The process works for other veggies too, such as carrots, cauliflower, string beans, beets, hard boiled eggs I've never done pickled potatoes or lettuce. I have been meaning to try asparagus, though.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
The recipe difference is probably in the amount of salt. These are very salty but very tasty.
post #4 of 10
Green tomatoes--I have to try those.

And Mary's recipe comes out crunchy and garlicky, I bet. Sounds right on!
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have seen fights over the garlic :lol: I use a lot of onion too. The pickled onion is great on a burger!
post #6 of 10
What type of onions do you use? Yellow, white, red, or something more specific?
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Usually yellow but I have used red and white. The yellow seem to add more flavor to the pickles. I just slice it and pack slices in the jar in between layers of cucumber.
post #8 of 10
Well then, I might make a batch using all three colors. I wonder how much the colors show when they're ready to eat.
post #9 of 10
I've also used red, yellow and white at various times. Your basic yellow onions seems to end up more 'oniony' in the final product, though the others are good. Red ones I seem to remember, leach a bit of red into the brine, giving it a pale pinkish hue.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #10 of 10
Pink brine, eh, wouldn't look as good. I sure do like red onions, though. Especially when a slice of raw onion in a sandwich is called for. Maybe it's not as good for pickling. The pink color would throw me off.
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