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Online Cooking Web Sites

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for online videos of how to cook different things and just wondering what people think about a fee-based web site called Cooks Illustrated.

Also, I see another fee-based web site called America's Test Kitchen - just looking for thoughts on that.

Thanks.
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 
I've already viewed a handful of amateur online videos of how to make an omelette. Some say use a medium heat pan so as not to burn the egg. At least one other one said to get your pan really hot. Sigh........
post #3 of 9
They're the same group. America's Test Kitchen should be free as I recall. Just sign up with an email address.

They're not bad. They're educational to a point and then they quickly lose value. Worthwhile for intermediate cooks and beginners who like the how and why.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
I just checked. America's Test Kitchen looks like it is free. Cook's Illustrated has a link for a 14-day free trial. There's also something called America's Test Kitchen TV OnDemand which has some fee.
post #5 of 9
Cooks Illustrated web site is an extension of the magazine and they charge the magazine subscribers extra for access. That reason is one that made me drop the magazine. The other is I don't agree with the lets change a recipe so it can be cooked in 1/2 hour no matter what happens to the flavor.
post #6 of 9
You can cook an omelet successfully both ways, and other ways too. Julia Child used a fairly high heat technique and cooked an omelet in about a minute making it a practical dinner party affair.

An omelet, like biscuits, appears deceptively simple. They have Very few ingredients, come together quickly to a great reception.

They are foods that I have never seen an adequate description for how to prepare them, even BDL's instructions fail. These foods are all about feel and technique. You have to learn it directly through experience and figure out what works for you and what doesn't.

As an example, I don't like my center to have runny egg as in the classic french fashion. So my preferred omelet technique is non-standard. This means I prefer to flip the omelet in the pan, fill, then roll. I start on medium heat with some stirring toget the egg about half set. I have to leave it undisturbed for a while so it holds together when flipped. Most omelet recipes include fairly vigorous agitation to get most of the egg cooked. Those tend to come apart if you flip them. I'll lower the heat quite a bit while letting it set up. Then I flip, fill and roll, all very quickly. Then cook a bit longer on low to finish cooking the egg and melting cheese if needed.

I cooked four of those this morning for my family and one batch of plain scrambled eggs for my picky eater.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 9
Does CI do this? If they do then it's taking me WAY too long to cook their recipes...
post #8 of 9
I like both sites.
post #9 of 9
Many of CI's recipes are modified for faster cooking. Some of the stuff they do can really impact flavor.
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