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Homemade mayo goof

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just made a batch of homemade mayo using all olive oil - the olive oil flavor is overpowering. Is there any way I can fix this? Maybe do a second batch with a lighter oil (corn, canola) and mix them together or do I just scrap this batch and start over? Or could I fold in well beaten egg whites, whipped cream?
post #2 of 19
I would make another batch and addsome of the olive oil mayo to it. Whenever I have made mayo with olive oil I have used only about 1/4-1/3 of the amount of olive oil and the rest a neutral oil.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your prompt reply! I made a second batch and incorporated some of the olive oil mayo and it tastes great. Thanks for your help.
post #4 of 19
I would NOT add egg whites -- they'll deflate if you don't use all the mayo soon, and you'd probably need an awful lot to smooth out the flavor. If you made a mousseline with whipped cream, as well as a higher proportion of neutral oil-mayo to olive oil-mayo (as Pete suggested), you might be able to use a bit more of the olive oil stuff, since the cream will also cut the strength of the oil flavor. :lips:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'll try adding whipped cream tomorrow to the olive oil intense mayo - I think more cream than mayo. I'm thinking open faced crab sandwiches and drooling. Thank you Suzanne.
post #6 of 19
You don't say what type of olive oil you used, but next time don't use extra virgin. People are conditioned to think extra virgin is superior to virgin or pure olive oil. This is not true. Extra virgin is the first pressing and has more olive flavor. Use it in salad dressings or to saute or dress vegetables where you want that flavor. Otherwise, use virgin or pure, which are the second and third pressings respectively. They have less olive flavor and are more suited to some applications. No one form is better or worse than the other. They are all olive oil, but are used in different manners.
post #7 of 19
My last few batches I've used safflower oil which has a mild, neutral taste. Some years ago I made a batch using all sesame oil - not a good idea. It was probably worse than your overly olive batch. But 3 - 4 parts peanut oil to 1 part sesame is a whole different story.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #8 of 19
I haven't tried making my own mayo yet, but I'd like to. Would grapeseed oil work? What oil is best?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 19

My basic mayo

After some trial and error, I found that 3/4 canola oil and 1/4 extra virgin olive oil in my food processor mayonnaise recipe is the ideal flavor most general mayo uses, including remoulade, tartar sauce, and particularly chicken salad. The recipe I use also has white wine vinegar and lemon juice. Using pasteurized eggs at room temperature results in a very light and creamy product.:chef:
post #10 of 19
Can I use grapeseed oil or safflower oil?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #11 of 19
Taste the oil before using. The mayo will taste like whatever oil you use. Unsurprising since it's about 3/4 oil. Safflower oil has very little taste, grapeseed more, rapeseed (canola) practically none. Safflower has a very light texture. If you're looking for a silky-velvety mayonnaise, safflower won't be much help. Corn oil is fairly neutral and good for mixing with stronger flavored oils like EVOO or walnut for instance. Sesame oil is extremely strong, and should be used by the tsp only for flavoring.

As a general rule: If you know your ingredients, you have a pretty good idea of how any given oil will affect the mayonnaise. Map -- this goes double for you, because you have a very good palate and do know your ingredients.

BDL
post #12 of 19
Aww shucks, no one's ever complimented my palate before! :bounce:

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #13 of 19
One thing that you can try and do is add some garlic to it, season it with lemon juice and pass it off as a fake Aioli. Better than throwing it out. Serve it up with some bread and cut up vegetables, and you have created a new sensation.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
I ended up making a second batch with canola oil, then mixing in half the olive oil mayo - tasted great. Whipped up some cream and added oilive oil mayo - really good. Have about a 1/4 cup left of the oo mayo - still haven't decided what to do with it...so many ideas, so little time. Thanks for all the feedback everyone.
post #15 of 19
maybe it's my old fashioned thinkin' but I would never alter the oil, canola+ eggwhite + good seasoning. Personally I make it up w some garlic, and wholegrain mustard, but a basic sauce, should remain basic. Okay-okay mayo is not a sauce as such. Anyways I think people are goin'mad with olive oil,- but it's just my point of view.
post #16 of 19
Reparon,

Your recipe is simple, but not "old fashioned," and certainly not basic nor classic. Is it seems to be some sort of "lite" version?

Mayonnaise is a mother sauce, and is made with a recipe which includes neither canola nor egg whites. You can make a mild, low-cal version with canola, and you can "cut the fat" by using a lot of white with very little yolk. Unfortunately, your mayonnaise will lack richness and good texture. FWIW, olive oil, if not a fruity extra-virgin, is one of the traditional ingredients.

BDL
post #17 of 19
huhh, I always write silly things. Of course yolks, not eggwhite. On the other hand I would still consider Mayo as a dressing rather than a sauce,- but it's just a terminology question. What I was trying to say is, that the technique is important, beating the egg as a lunatic is important as well as slowly adding the oil. I would say still that olive oil is just way too overrated.
:crazy:
post #18 of 19

Macadamia Nut Oil

Recently an acquaintance suggested using Macadamia nut oil in cooking and salad dressings. I've not done so yet, but have been reading about the oil, it's benefits, pros and cons ... from what I can tell, not having tried it - still need a good local source - it may be a nice oil to use in mayonnaise. Has anyone used the oil, either in mayo, in cooking, or on salads? Comments?
post #19 of 19

Mayo

When I make my own mayo, I use rice oil because it is neutral in flavor and you get health benefits as well. Check out October 08 issue in Cooks Illustrated for a comparison of rice oil and canola oil for taste.

S:lol:ometimes I put in wasabi powder for a good kick.
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