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Smoked Salt

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I was watching an episode of Daniel After Hours and while I've seen smoked salt before, this episode piqued my curiosity again.

There are obviously 1,001 different types, but which have you guys had experience with and what did you use it for?

anyone smoked salt themselves? if so, how so, how did it turn out etc?

how about pepper?
post #2 of 18
I've put kosher salt in my smoker while smoking other things. Stirred it every few hours. It has a nice smokey flavor. I'll do it again this week as that salt jar is getting low.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
what dishes do you use it in?
post #4 of 18
A friend who's into salt-tasting set out a few different kinds, some of which were smoked. We just dipped radishes into the salt and ate them with a lovely Portuguese white wine. The smoked ones were fabulous!
Emily

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Emily

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post #5 of 18
Smoked salt goes on most anything that will visit the grill. Steaks, burgers, chicken, chops. But it's also good on roasts in the oven and pan seared meats. Not every time of course but as a variation from the norm. Also grilled vegetables, but mostly meats for me.

As noted, it's a fun contrast with fresh vegetables offering a taste associated with cooked foods but on something raw.

I also use it in my barbecue rubs frequently, but again, not every time.

If you want to shortcut the whole thing, besides buying smoked salt, you can buy smoke powder, essentially powdered liquid smoke, and mix it with salt at your own intensity. If you want to darken the color, a bit of cocoa powder. You can get smoke powder through Welcome to the Spices Etc. web site! Here you'll find both common and unusual herbs, spices, seasonings and other quality cooking ingredients you'll come to expect from Spices Etc.. I've used it before and actually like it better than liquid smoke.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 18
I've never had smoked salt its about time though
post #7 of 18
can you smoke low sodium salt??
that smoked salt sounds gorgous
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #8 of 18
Any salt can be smoked, Tessa.

It's best to use indirect heat, though (which is true about any smoking), and keep the temps low. As somebody said, run it for several hours, stirring now and again.

When I was heavily into smoke curing I developed a seasoning mix used as both a dry rub and the base for a brine. It's since become a basic seasoning, particularly when I'm on the road. It is good as-is, or smokes wonderfully. If you're interested, just sub the low-sodium salt for the regular:

Smoking Salt

1 container (1 lb 10 oz) table salt
1 tbls onion salt
2 tbls celery salt
1tbls garlic salt
2 tbls paprika
4 tbls white pepper
2 tbls dill salt
4 tbls white sugar

Mix all ingredients in a bowl until well blended. Store in an air-tight container (I use a 1 quart canning jar).
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 18
We use it for seasoning meats which are about to be grilled over charcoal -- especially steak and lamb. We also use it as a just for the heck of it salt sometimes, the same way we use pink and black salts.

BDL
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
on the episode of After Hours with Daniel (Boulud) they were at a steakhouse (BLT) and they were smoking their own salt and pepper to use on a nice dry aged steak.

worth a watch. I watched it on HULU.
post #11 of 18
Anybody have experience with truffled salt? It's very expensive, but I might give it a try.

Is it really truffled, or synthetic like truffle oil?
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #12 of 18
I've used smoked sea salt which we used for a smoked/grilled foie gras terrine. Nice flavors, but can get super intense if smoked too long.
post #13 of 18
The one I tried had small bits of black truffles in it with the sea salt, although I wouldn't be surprised if some of them have the synthetic oil added as well. I had one of the truffled salts but don't remember which one. It was nice...of course it did have truffles in it :lips:.

I'm not too crazy about the smoked salt. I'd rather buy some Fleur De Sel or one of the others. But I may have to try and smoke my own. Now that would be worth it!



dan
post #14 of 18
what does the pink salt taste like , and black salt that sounds intriguing please tell me some more about it
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #15 of 18
Salt is a clean, white crystalline mineral. A rock, basically, composed of a chemical bond of two substances that would kill you if ingested seperately. I'm just guessing here, I've never inhaled a whiff of pure chlorine or chomped on a chunk of pure sodium, so I'm still here annoying you with my blathering posts.

The mix, though, is great stuff, one of the miracles of life and a mainstay of culinary arts. Pink, black, whatever, the additive in the salt is some sort of dirt that gives it the different taste and color. Not exactly dirt dirt, like what is under the grass in your lawn, but various minerals and such leached out of the ground or surrounding beaches or whatever.

I'd like to try some of these more exotic salts someday. I'm a bit surprised that living here in Salt Lake we don't have a big supply of brine shrimp salt available!

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #16 of 18
At the restaurant I used to work at, we used smoked sea salt whipped butter on our house-made Gruyere biscuits (we love excess:-) We just through about 20 pounds of unsalted butter into the mixer and whipped it with the smoked salt. Lovely. We also used truffle salt on our fries for steak frites and moules frites. Ditto, lovely:lips:
Jenni
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Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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post #17 of 18
Smoked salts are delicious on a variety of meats. I especially like grilling with them. Vegetables are pretty good too. And its pretty easy to do yourself. I think that phatch did a good job of describing how to smoke salt. But make sure you don't over do it or it could over power your food.:smoking:
post #18 of 18
Even if you over do it, just thin it out with plain salt to your taste level.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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