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What!! There's no cranberries in here!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I just bought some cranberry beans, and there were no cranberries inside.

I heated them up in some oil, and the outside was inedible, and inside there were just regular beans.

Anyone had these before?
post #2 of 17
uhmmmmmm, cranberry beans are not cranberries. they are beans.

the name refers to the marbleized coloring
post #3 of 17
Cranberry beans, Abe, are heirloom common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). There are two types.

The true Cranberry bean is named for the fact is is pure red, and resembles cranberries. From any sort of distance you could easily mistake one for the other.

The Vermont Cranberry bean is mottled. It's one of the top three preferred choices for making New England Baked Beans.

You can substitute the Cranberry beans in any recipe calling for dried beans.

Sorry you were confused. As a rule, if a package says "beans" it usually means it. The major exception is that in some locales they use the word "bean" to describe cowpeas. In Jamaica, for instance, they call black-eyed peas black-eyed beans.

There's also a candy they call "Boston Baked Beans." But there's no mistaking it for anything else.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 17
What are the others?

Is New England Baked Beans the same as Boston Baked Beans?
post #5 of 17
The other two are Yellow Eye (aka Molasses Face)---which is the number one choice, especially in Maine, and Trout (aka Jacob's Cattle).

Trout is a Native American variety, dating to pre-contact. If you've ever seen the anasazzi bean they are very similar in appearance.

Yellow Eye has not been dated, to the best of my knowledge, except as "very old" (Benjamin Watson). Oddly enough, Fearing Burr, despite his decided New England bias, does not mention it by either name. But he does list a Yellow Eyed China, whose description is similar. Beans of New York lists them as synonyms, which dates them to pre-1863.

Amelia Simmons, in the 1796 American Cookery (said to be the first American cookbook) refers to the Cranberry.

So, they're all rather old.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 17
>Is New England Baked Beans the same as Boston Baked Beans? <

Yes and no.

I was using the term generically to include all of the dozens (perhaps hundreds) of variations. Seems like every housewife in the Northeast has her own recipe.

They vary by the herbs and spices included, and whether onions are or are not part of the mix. While most use salt pork, some are made with bacon. And so on. But the major difference is the type of sweetener used: molasses, brown sugar, or maple syrup being the most common.

Yellow Eye was the dominent bean in the commercial Boston market. So we could say with some assurance that Boston Baked Beans are made with Yellow Eye beans and molasses as the sweetener.

However, John Withee's recipe for Boston Baked Beans specifies either Navy or Pea beans, and maple syrup as the sweetener. And his own baked beans recipe specifies either Jacob's Cattle, Yellow Eye, or Soldier beans, with blackstrap molasses as the sweetener, and smoked bacon instead of salt pork.

So, as is often the case with rustic foods, you pays your money and takes your chances.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 17
Thanks! I was going through an old cook book recently and saw a nice recipe with great photos on Boston Baked Beans. Never made 'em before, and was thinking it might be nice to do so this fall and winter. So I'm starting to look for ideas and techniques, and seek out some good "authentic" ingredients.
post #8 of 17
Shel,

See if you can find a copy of John E. Withee's long out of print, Growing and Cooking Beans. He's got more than a dozen "authentic" baked bean recipes in it, along with numerous other bean recipes.

It was published in 1980 by Yankee Publishing.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 17
you'll be needing a bean pot too.....there's a grower that sells shell beans in Santa Monica, Windrose Farm.....they are certified organic through CCOF....(805) 239-3757. I picked up a variety last trip to CA. I'm looking at Black Eyed Peas aka tohono O'odham, which don't resemble black eyed peas at all. There's a farm that sells fresh giganti beans (and others) at Ferry Plaza.

I've got D'Allasandro's Trout beans, Cranberry beans and Marrow beans.....
they are commercially sold throughout the US.....they wholesale also.

Marrow would make an interesting bean pot, with MO sorghum.....midwest version if you will.....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #10 of 17
Not to stray off topic but you have me thinking now, about beans and cranberries together! Maybe this could work with chick peas and cardamom, perhaps cinnamon, over couscous....!
post #11 of 17
'shroom,

Are there any variatal names associated with those marrows?

Beans of New York lists five varieties: Nova Scotia, Perry, Red, Vineless, and White.

Fearing Burr only lists on, the White Marrow. Which would indicate that they had gotten more popular over the 70 years between the two books. By 1998, however, the 5th edition of the Garden Seed Inventory lists only the White Marrow as available, with only one source. But it also lists the White Marrowfat (which Burr says are the same bean) with six suppliers.

The Tahono O'odham is just one of about 240 cowpea varieties. It's almost a mirror image of black-eyed peas, having white eyes and black splotches.

BTW, if anyone finds a bean variety they particularly like, keep in mind that all beans are open pollinated, so you can grow them out and save the seed. But also keep in mind that most beans sold for culinary purposes are bush types, rather than pole types. So you'll need more room for them.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 17
dug alittle deeper....marrow beans didn't have any other descriptions. Found the Italian butter beans sold by the Giganti grower in Half Moon Bay, CA. Iacopi Farms. I've got appoloosa, soldier, lots of cranberry type and then some unmarked and long forgotten named ones. One is plump and the size of a cranberry bean only black and white.
Got funny little rice beans......too fun.

Just found out our local shell bean farmer has colon cancer, he had surgery last week and is trying to get his beans thrashed this week.
Pintos, black beans (midnight?), red beans (ala New Orleans) & new this year was French Heirloom which was pink and white. Some of the guys have played around raising tongues of fire or rattlesnake, one farmer raises crowder peas......

So, KY seems like no one around here has heard of field peas with snaps. Used to be a standard in the deep south, wonder which states have them....any idea?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 17
I only know one person who mixes cowpeas and snaps. So don't know how common that might have been.

But there are lots of people who use cowpeas just like snaps; that is, cooking them in the pods while they're fresh and green. If you think about it, cooking yard long beans is the same thing, as they are related.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 17
not to hijack the thread, my 8 year old niece and I were dining al fresco at a nice Italian restaurant.....her bean guancala (sp?) came and she ate the green beans leaving the dark purple (black) pieces from foot longs......I asked what was up with that and she bent toward me, lowered her voice and said," their black, they burned them"........I could not help but laugh.....

field peas and snaps.....Mississippi, Arkansas, not sure about northern LA or Al.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #15 of 17
Ya gotta love kids.

Now, when you add that to one of your menus, you have to call it "they burnned the beans somethin" :)
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #16 of 17
I have not seen any type of field peas with or without snaps since moving to Indiana 10 years ago from southeast Georgia. My dad grew crowders, black eyes, zippers, big boys, etc. in our home garden and those were the best peas ever! I've also not seen any shelling beans since moving up here. I miss those fresh butterbeans and peas so much. Yeah, I can get frozen or canned peas and beans but have not found any way to cook them so they taste like the ones my parents have. One of the nice things about visiting is my mom always cooks some from their freezer so I get to eat my fill while there.
post #17 of 17
a pot of butterbeans cooking for hours on the stove, garlic, thyme, onion, bay leaf, possibly carrots and celery.....usually with a smoked pig piece....

Hot cornbread with butter and possibly sorghum.....

ok, it's time to go to the store and pick up that buttermilk.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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