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May have to fire a friend.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Asked a friend and REALLY good worker to be my pastry cook but she ends up moving. I convinced a different friend to quit her other job and work for me (I was her boss at the other job; the owner is a craaaazy businesswoman so I thought IW as doing her a favor). After a little over a month, she's not meeting my standards and definitely not the Chef's standards. Didn't stay to pitch in with every other employee to clean after a busy Saturday night. Isn't striving for perfection.. you know that sort of thing. I need to have a talk with her and I Want to give her another chance, but it's my job I have to worry about and I just don't see it. It's hard because I stole her from somewhere else and she needs the money. Also, the other girl is now moving back. How convenient.


Never had to fire a friend before.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #2 of 9
Always a difficult situation hiring friends. The fact that the friend had worked in an employer/employee relationship with you prior should allow you to easily take the employer position once again.

The one thing I didn't see you mention was that you sat this person down to talk and give them the opportunity to succeed. You just can't take it for granted that the friend (or anyone for that fact) is going to be able to read your mind and understand what is needed.

They are still your employee regardless of friendship. Sit the person down and discuss things in a productive manner. If the person takes a defensive stance give them a little breathing room but be firm. Stress what is required of them and explain that they will be held to this standard, no matter what.

Then let them know that it's their option/decision/choice to perform or not to required standards and that if they fail to perform then it will probably result in their being let go.

Give the person, no matter if they are friend or not, the opportunity to redeem or hang themselves. If they succeed then none the worse for wear but if they fall short, you know that you gave them every opportunity to succeed. They may not see it this way as is always the chance no matter what the prior relationship may have been but at least you'll sleep better at night.:chef:
post #3 of 9
I agree with Oldschool. Whether its friend or not a sit down should take place. Its the honorable thing to do. If her attitude and performance doesn't change after you have sat her down, then at least you will be able to keep face knowing you didn't just let a friend go with out the oportunity for change. If not for her(profesional curtisy) do it for your own well being.:smoking:
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #4 of 9
Sounds like your new gal dropped the ball. You shouldn't have to ask someone to do the things one naturally would do after a busy night.
It also sounds like it could cost you your job. Jobs are a little tough to
find right now.....I would sit down with her and say: "Give me three reasons I should keep you". She probably won't have any. Then explain to her why you are so dissappointed with her. Offer her the option to resign.....extend a letter of reccommendation in hopes that this was a wake-up call for her. It's a restaurant. Your not only doing a diservice to yourself, but, to your staff.
Sounds hard, but, if your not hindered by HR practices and procedure, I would let her go.
post #5 of 9
I have hired a friend once. I explained to him that " MY " kitchen is a production kitchen, If you cant quickly catch on, keep up with the orders,and stay busy even when orders are not comming in, I'll fire you. Its hard to do, but if let them know how things work before you hire them, then they understand why you are letting them go when the time comes. Yes this person is my friend, but doing my job comes before friendship, under most conditions. Doing it this way has worked out best for me. Good luck to you and I hope your friend understands why you have to let her go.
post #6 of 9
When you worked previously with this person did they do a good job or did you hired her just as a favor? If it's the former, then you need to have a talk with her and give her a chance to save her job. After all, you recruited her. If it's the latter, then shame on you for making a bad hired for the wrong reasons. Almost everyone that has hired and fired has been in your shoes - we all eventually learn not to hire friends/family or to hire out of desperation. It will usually come back to bite you.


Good luck,

Willie
post #7 of 9
The FIRST person I ever had to fire, was my best friend. Not an aquaintance, but this was, for all intents and purposes, my brother. I gave him numerous chances, and sat down and explained things with him on both a professional level and a personal level. The day I fired him, I was sick. But it was my job. He got mad at me for waiting so long and for being upset about it. Two things if this personi s a true friend , it wont affect the friendsship, and if they were a good worker you wouldnt be having the problem of terminating them. I dont like terminating employees, it still makes me sick, but when I find myself having difficulty with the situation, I simply say to myself, "well, you fired your best friend, this should be easy", and when i put it those terms.. it is.

sit this person down and explain where youre at both in a business situation and on a personal level. Put the ball in their cort, ask them to "help" you resolve the situation. And leave it up to them.... hope this helps.
post #8 of 9
Dear you should give her one chance and talk to her of your problems. Table talk is the way to remove the all tensions and clashes. And as a professionally :chef: i advice you that don't enter in any other life in future.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your replies.

When she worked with me at the other place, she was a good worker. She got stuff done, etc. However, the atmosphere was different, and she was in line for my job.
Time has passed, and I have talked to her about what I expect, what the E. Chef expects, and gave her a chance to respond, etc. There were three strikes against her, including her last day being 2 hours late. Her heart wasn't into it. I could tell. I don't even know why she accepted the job in the first place. I thought it's what she really wanted. The chef and I had actually planned on letting her go that day, it was just easier because she showed up 2 hours late.

Well, long story short, it was totally my fault that she didn't work out. Got my other friend in, she was totally professional when she visited, a lot more enthusiastic and excited. She worked a couple days and was hired. She's just great. Pastries are her passion and she likes expirimenting with things people normally order in (e.g. puffy pastry). I don't have to tell her how to put a cake or bread together and she has her own recipes. I'm very happy.

Thanks for all your advice. I think I was desperate at the time because like all new restaurants, I was living there and needed a break. It can bite you back if you make a bad decision.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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