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Salisbury Steak

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
How did Salisbury get associated with something called steak that is sometimes, here in the USA, an excuse to use any quality ground beef (usually the lowest quality), combined with who-knows-what?

I need to believe that the original Salisbury steak was much better than what is sometimes sold with that name here. Help me out.
post #2 of 8
I have a vague recollection of some fellow named Dr. Salisbury that about 100 years ago was a proponent of ground meat, claiming it was easier to digest and therefore healthier than solid cuts. Of course, once chewed up I don't see much difference.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 8
Don't know how true it is, but the story I was told was that it's merely a rename for hamburger. Many dishes with Germanic names were changed that way during the two big wars, as part of anti-German feelings in Great Britain and the United States.

Only time I've had it was in school. Which means, of course, it was a badly prepared hamburger patty served in a pasty brown sauce. Bad food memory to say the least.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 8
You are right, It was named after Dr.James J Salisbury from NY. who thought it would be a cure for Diarrhea for the troops in the civil war. He thought they were eating to much starch, so he made the meat mix with only 1/3 crumbs of old bread and chopped onions, claiming that was enough starch for the total daily consumption.
He felt cutting back to only 1/3 of our total starch consumption for the day would heal all of our ills.
In 1945 the name was brought back because people did not want to read on a menu "Hamburger Steak," so Salisbury Steak sounded nicer.
Swanson even made it more popular in the 50s with the advent of the tv dinner.It was the second tv dinner in their product line.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #5 of 8
a CURE for the squirts? pssh....if he only knew what swanson would do..
post #6 of 8
Properly made its not a bad meal with some roasted garlic mashed potatoes. I start with organic ground beef that's about 85% lean, add 1 egg per pound, enough bread crumbs to help bind it, some water from the dried mushrooms (I have 2 pounds of morels left from this years season) that I rehydrate for the gravy. Form the meat into patties, sear in a very hot pan with a little bacon fat to form a nice crust, remove from the pan and add a sliced onion. Cook the onion until it starts to brown, add a small clove of garlic and the rehydrated mushrooms. Cook this down over lower heat until some of the water is gone from the mushrooms. Add good beef stock and the strained mushroom liquid and bring to a simmer. Add the meat patties back to the pan and cook until done. Remove the meat and thicken the gravy in whatever way you prefer. Serve over roasted garlic mashed potatoes. Don't ask for exact amounts, I never measure :lol:
post #7 of 8
Nice information. Thanks.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
As I just now said in another thread about meatballs (which I really like done my way), I think chopped onions don't belong mixed in with ground meat. Cooked on the side for a sauce, sure!
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