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Fresh squeezed, home made..?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
There is a restaurant that I used to frequent that sold fresh squeezed orange juice for breakfast and during the day. When you'd order OJ, they would squeeze it for you right before your eyes - each glass made to order.

Some time ago they started selling juice that was squeezed elsewhere, purchased in one gallon sized plastic containers (like the milk jugs), and the juice was poured from the containers whenever a glass was ordered.

I questioned the owner of the restaurant and asked how she could sell the juice as "fresh squeezed" and she replied that when the juice was made, it was fresh squeezed. The fact of the matter is that the customer, and even the staff, didn't know for sure how old the juice was that was poured from the container - a day? two? a week?

Over the years we have all seen juice described as "fresh squeezed" on various restaurant menus, and in most cases the juice was squeezed elsewhere at some undetermined time. Now, am I being picky by suggesting that this juice is not fresh squeezed? Do you get such juice at your favorite breakfast place, and accept it as fresh? I don't, and I don't buy juice that's poured from plastic jugs. And I cannot help but wonder what other "fresh" items come prepackaged from somewhere else.

It was mentioned in another thread that some places sell pre-wrapped Costco muffins that are described as fresh or home made? What actually constitutes a "home made" muffin or pastry? I'd think to deserve that description the item must at least have to be made on the premises. What do you think?
post #2 of 12
To me "fresh squeezed" or "homemade" means it was done at the location I, as the consumer, am purchasing it.

As I recall from back in the days when I had my bakery, there were regulations form the state that pertained to these kinds of claims.
post #3 of 12
It was mentioned in another thread that some places sell pre-wrapped Costco muffins that are described as fresh or home made? What actually constitutes a "home made" muffin or pastry? I'd think to deserve that description the item must at least have to be made on the premises. What do you think?
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Shel


Unless somebody lives there, in my opinion it isn;t home made, it's home style!

Is Home Made juice from outside source pasteurized? Are oranges impoprted?
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post #4 of 12
From what I understand about labelling laws, and I'm no lawyer. Fresh squeezed can be applied to any OJ that was not made from concentrate. Even if it has been pasturized, stuffed into a cardboard carton, and left to sit on a supermarket shelf for 2 weeks, as long as it wasn't made from concentrate it can be labelled "fresh squeezed. At least that is my understanding.

There is the same issue with poultry. As long as the bird has been kept at 26 degrees or higher (not exactly sure of the exact degree but 26 sticks in my head) it can be called fresh, though technically at 26 degrees it is partially frozen. Got into a fight with a local grocer over that one.
post #5 of 12
Hmm fresh squeezed chicken juice. Yum (Jes' bein' silly) :lol:
post #6 of 12
Oh Yeti, That's totally gross hehehehehe :lol: Do you have that on ice or thru a straw with a li'l umbrella stuck on the side?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 12
Years ago the FDA calloed this FROSTED
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post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
What's your point? Are you suggesting that because some government agency says old, processed, frozen items can be designated as "fresh," they are fresh? Personally, I've long ago stopped using the government as my reference point for anything regarding food
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Bingo! When I used to see "Home made" on a menu, I believed the food was made in someone's home and brought into the restaurant. Of course, I'm older and, perhaps, wiser these days, and have come to realize that was just nonesense. Now home made can mean anything, just as fresh can mean anything.

But I bet back in the good ol' days, there were a lot of places selling real, home made pies or cakes. It wasn't long ago that the little Italian deli I frequent was selling home made chocolate turtles made by the owner's daughter. She'd make them at home, wrap them, and put them out on the deli counter in a little straw basket. Mmmmm - they were good. And Margaret, one of the long-time clerks in the store, would sometimes bring in her famous Crostata di Ricotta alla Romana, slice and wrap it, and offer it for sale in the cheese display.
post #10 of 12
But I bet back in the good ol' days, there were a lot of places selling real, home made pies or cakes. It wasn't long ago that the little Italian deli I frequent was selling home made chocolate turtles made by the owner's daughter. She'd make them at home, wrap them, and put them out on the deli counter in a little straw basket. Mmmmm - they were good. And Margaret, one of the long-time clerks in the store, would sometimes bring in her famous Crostata di Ricotta alla Romana, slice and wrap it, and offer it for sale in the cheese display. SHEL

Dont know the local health Dept laws in all states, but here and NY you could not processs anything in your home and sell it in a retail or wholesale outlet. The owner would have to make sure the source of product was licensed and inspected. God forbid you purchased interstate, then the FDA became involved. That in itself was asking for disaster.
SHEL, I just accepted a part time position cooking and explaining things to the public in our new local Whole Foods Store to keep me busy, I cant handle this retirement life. I will now be able to tell you things about source and handling of products first hand.
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post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
That's the case here, too. However, Joe Zarri, the deli's owner, started his business before a lot of the regulations now in effect took place, and he was "grandfathered" in for a lot of things. When he sold the business, John, the new owner, had to put in new refrigeration, new floors, new electrical, yadda yadda yaddda. Now you can't get a warm salami sandwich - all the sandwich meats are cold because of the stupid regulations regarding refrigeration. If I want a room temp sandwich - which is nice and flavorful - I have to call ahead and ask John or Margaret to make it and set it aside for pickup later in the day. Or I have to let it sit in the car for a while and warm up on the dash board.


That's great! Just like my grandfather. When he retired and moved to Miami, he couldn't not work, and ended up working in some produce markets for a number of years. He was a produce guy all his life, and when he retired, he sold his stores and moved to Florida, where he then worked in the same type of stores he retired from.

IMO, it's wonderful that you're doing what you're doing. Your knowledge and experience can be helpful to so many people - if they take a moment to listen and learn.

Just a little parenthetical aside: After grandpa Jack sold his stores, he wanted to keep working, and was looking for a part time job. At the time I was working for the E.J. Korvette supermarket chain, and asked Julie Kravitz, the head of the produce department, if he might have a spot for grandpa. He said that there were no openings, but then asked who my grandpa was. When I told him he said that he'd find a place for him. Grandpa Jack had quite a reputation in the NYC produce business, and Julie was grateful to have him working at the store in The Bronx.

It was grandpa Jack who got me interested in, and understanding of, good fruits and vegetables, and why I'm such a stickler for high quality produce these days. Grandpa Jack would love some of the current farmers' markets. Back in the day, he'd buy directly from the farmers. They'd drive in to the produce market in NYC in their trucks, and Grandpa Jack would buy directly from them. Sometimes I'd go with him to the market - we'd leave at 2:00am and head to the market, buy produce from all over the east coast - citrus from Florida, apples from upstate NY and New England, vegetables from local farms in NY and New Jersey ... the farmers and growers would often save the good stuff and special deals for Jack - he'd pay top price for top goods, and was, in addition, very friendly and outgoing. Everyone, it seemed, liked him.

Nice memories ....
post #12 of 12
He was probably arround in my time, when the wholesale market was downtown on the west side before HUNTS Terminal market. I also remember EJ Korvette. Do yoy know what E J Korvette name stood for? I was amazed when I found out.
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