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Bean Pot

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Plans are afoot to make baked beans this fall and winter and I'd like to get a bean pot in which to bake the beans. What should I be looking for? I'd like to use something traditional, but am open to suggestions. Also, what size should I consider ... I was thinking a gallon size, but I don't know why. It seems like that may make a lot of beans. Maybe 2 or 3 quarts?

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post #2 of 17
Shel,

A traditional bean pot is designed to be buried in the ground.

Calling something destined to be used in the oven a "bean pot" is the same as calling a kettle a Dutch oven. It's modern usage. But it's not truly traditional.

Thus, anything with a tight-fitting lid will serve.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
I want to get something like this:



Is that not a bean pot? If not, what would it be? The web site I went to called it a bean pot ...
post #4 of 17
equipment posts belong in the equipment forum. At least I assume that's part of why we have an equipment forum.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
So move the post - you're able and authorized to do so, are you not? I'm just an ignorant member who sometimes screws up the location of where to post messages.
post #6 of 17
I don't have any power in the questions forum. Just suggestions.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 17
2 qts is too small for a pound of (dry) beans. 3 qts is more like it.

It seems to me that a close fitting pot makes better beans than one that's too large. One that's even close to too small will overflow -- guaranteed. So size is very important. You can always buy more than one.

I've used all kinds of pottery -- Chinese sand pots, Georg Jensen "Iron Mountain" pottery, you name it, with good results. The little, old-fashioned, Boston style do a fine job, and so does enamel over cast iron, and for that matter, plain cast iron.

Heavy seems to be better than light. The beans will burn and stick to the floors and walls of lighter pots.

Bean tip: After soaking your beans, try par-boiling them in water heavily "salted" with baking soda for a few minutes; then thoroughly draining and rinsing before baking. It makes for a creamy, tender, less gaseous bean.

BDL
post #8 of 17
""Bean tip: After soaking your beans, try par-boiling them in water heavily "salted" with baking soda for a few minutes; then thoroughly draining and rinsing before baking. It makes for a creamy, tender, less gaseous bean""
BDL

If you soak beans over=night in salt and baking soda, it does same thing. I believe it changes the PH of the water and makes beans actually expand more so then in just water, it works well and cuts cooking time down about 1/3 to 1/2 depending on type and size of legume.

I use my moms old crockpot and they come out great:lol:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks 4 ur suggestions. I'd like to get a pot like the one pictured only because it may make a nice serving piece at the table. I'm not wedded to the "Baked Beans" logo, but the general pot design seems nice.
post #10 of 17
shel,
i have a pfaltzgraf(sp?) bean pot that has served me well for about 20 years, it holds a pound of pre-soaked beans plus other ingredients. if you google the name, there is a catalogue available.
kathee
post #11 of 17
Shel,

I'm not sure about your dating status -- but those old fashioned bean pots fit nicely in the "chicks dig it" class. I've never met a woman who thought they were anything other than "cute." You could do worse.

BDL
post #12 of 17
Shel, there are lots of pots with that design floating around, and you should be able to find one without much trouble.

The pot body shape is more or less traditional. The major difference is that original ones did not have loop handles, because they could break off too easily in the burying and digging up. Instead they either had no handles, or molded in drawer-pull type undercut handles.

And I certainly agree with BDL in terms of capacity.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 17
Crock pot with a removable liner. I use a half size steam table pan that's 4 inches deep then transfer to a warmed serving dish. The stainless is much easier to clean! :lol:
post #14 of 17
Got a funky glittery pot from New Mexico for my birthday.....apparently there's clay that has sparkles inherently in it. Not cured it yet, still sitting on my coffee table.....looked alittle garish when I opened the box prior to knowing that it's magical. :p:smiles: It'll be interesting to see how it cooks.

Cute bean pots, yeah that's what chicks dig in a guy....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Magic beans?

Glad to know that you and BDL agree. I've been trying to get by with good looks and personality ...
post #16 of 17
guess they would be the giganti ones......

twinkly eyes and a sense of humor always was my downfall.....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #17 of 17
And here I thought it was because I could cook.

BDL
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