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cordon bleu programs vs. schools

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Okay, here's something that has some of us confused.

I've been aware of Condon Bleu in Paris, London, Tokyo, Ottawa, and Syndey.

But suddenly there are all these "in association with le cordon bleu" programs at culinary schools in the US. I did a web search last night, and they all use the same exact paragraph decsribing their cordon bleu program, which I found slightly odd.

How are these programs compared to the already established Bleus? Is this just an example of the Bleu capitalizing on name recognition, and basically merchandising their name?

(I'm patricularly interested in whatever y'all might have to say, b/c I've been looking into Ottawa- The thought of living there for a year appeals to me).
post #2 of 13

Le Cordon Bleu Schools...

There is one in Portland, Oregon and Scottsdale (my school) in Arizona. They are owned and run by the same system.
What they have arranged is basically a sister school system to the main academy in Paris. We follow the same curriculum and have the same standards of conduct, uniform and stuff as the original campus in Paris. The reason there are campuses in australia or north america is because most people won't or can't move to a different continent to go to school for one year. They have the same blurb that you mentioned because it's the standard blurb handed down by LCB in Paris. My school uniforms have the seal for Le Cordon Bleu on the chest. It's no marketing ploy, I promise. It is 100% a Le Cordon Bleu school.
Hope this helps you out...
:D
Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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post #3 of 13
13dog, i would assume that the LCB that you do would be the intermediate course, cos i go to Ryde college in sydney and thats their course there.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #4 of 13

hmmm

i never heard any terms like "intermediate" .. it's just a plain old 2 year degree (done in one year) like you'd get from a junior college. I think we have a slightly different system here in the states... I may have over spoken myself back there. Alls I know is that my school is an LCB campus.
Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
I spoke with some folks from LCB, hoping they could clarify, and I was told that the schools in the US are not LCB campuses, but culinary academies that use the LCB curricula.

And it was hinted that these schools pay dearly for the right to use "Le Cordon Bleu" in their advertising.

I think I'm just as confused as I was before.
post #6 of 13
without dumping the fertiliser on LCB, it is quite expensive.

compare:

certificate 3 commercial cookery 2.5 yrs (AUD $220 per year)
certificate 2 LCB intermediate 10 wks (AUD$7000 per course)

and certificate II does not qualify you at trade level.

some info at:


http://www.tafensw.edu.au/nsi/course...pusGroupID=RYC
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #7 of 13

Well............

Maybe thats all a scam, but I'll tell you this.. I am learning a **** of a lot from these people. I'm not terribly concerned about the validity of the LCB affiliation after what you have just informed me of, but I will say that our instructors for the most part are some of the best people I've met in this business after five years of hard kitchen work. If nothing else I am learning about professionalism and that's really all that counts in the long haul as far as I'm concerned. Thanks for opening my eyes, I hope you've satisfied yourself in making the distiction, and I do appreciate it. But it's kind of like getting halfway through a great meal before you find out that it was microwaved or something stupid. It takes the shine off it, but it's still a good meal.
Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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post #8 of 13

OOH!

That came out so harsh... my god! I'm sorry if that pisses anyone off, but it is how I feel. I just phrased it sort of aggressively. My pardons...
Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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post #9 of 13
Actually, 13dog, the LCB course Nick is speaking of isn't what you're taking. The one he's talking about he states as being 10 weeks in length; your internship alone is 6 weeks, if I'm not mistaken. Your entire program is at least 18 months long, I'm guessing. So, no shine taken off then! :) As long as you are happy with the school and are getting as much or more out of it than you expected, then it's a good school for you.

BTW, there is an edit feature on this board. If you post something and want to change it, just look to the lower right of said post for a button that says "edit". The in-advance apology for the bad way some could take your wording works for me, though. Thanks, 13dog!
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #10 of 13

Yeah thats cool....

I know that having any culinary arts degree at all is valuable these days, but it's what happens when you're on the job that matters. thanks for your "boost" .
We take 78 credit hours of accredited college level classes without any more than 2 weeks off at xmas and one week off in july. The schedule is set in advance, you fail a class you retake it til you pass but you cannot go further in the program until you pass and you have to maintain at least a 2.0 GPA to remain a student. I've been to 'regular' college, this is much stricter and far more accelerated than even summer school classes. Instead of 2 or 3 days a week for 2 hours for 15 weeks, we have one class, 7:30 to 2 monday thru friday for 3 or 6 weeks, then tackle the next subject. If you miss one day, excused or not, a mandatory 5% is taken from your final grade percent for the class, thus lowering letter grades deeply, in some cases. It rocks. How else to learn the first and most important rule of the restaraunt business. That is, Show up, as scheduled, on time, every day, sick or not, tired or not, hung over or not and work your butt off, or you get tossed.
I like this mentality. It's why I chose SCI over CIA or J&W Denver.
Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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Thirteen is my dog's name, I am not 13 nor am I a dog......
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post #11 of 13

LCB coming to Orlando

The coveted Le Cordon Bleu is coming to Orlando. The Orlando Culinary Academy will open in July of 2002.

:bounce:
post #12 of 13

dont get trapped...........

most of these culinary institutions have become so commercial its pathetic..I could write a book on my first, worst experience with one of the most prest cul schools its,,,buy books and apprentice most of these "schools" are commercial education with private academy prices ,,,better of not having the name and paying less ..your paying for their fancy rolodexes with the hopes they will land you that fat paying job when you get out and reality is you will be starting with that little above minimum wage job when you get out..If you realize you have the love for the food and skilled hands, dont sign your life away to pay off student loans,, go to the best places and sell yourself..if they see the fire in your eyes they will give you a shot......I tell you its ,so because I remember years ago when I sat with Charlie Trotter to sell myself and be invited into the Trotter family and there are all kinds of great chefs that dont take much merit in what school you went to more ,,the level of hunger they can feel in your enthusiasm, and views on work ethic...........remember your not going to law school.......

Remember not all of the greatest food innovators , have worn the jacket of commercial colors...........
post #13 of 13
i wasnt rubbishing the content of the course, more the excessive cost. Its is only because of the comparitive costs, that for a similar qualification, that it seems somewhat over the top.

Many chefs that i have spoken have in fact rubbished the course, given that (and they have witnessed these things) that a lot of ppl who can afford the course have no idea whatsoever about the trade that they may be associated with.

one example that i can give is that all their commodities are virtually weighed out and separated on trays prior to their examinations and explanations are given as to what is required where and to not misuse them.

where in the real world would someone go into a restaurant situation and have that occur for them time after time?.

now this is what i have personally seen and had explained to me. Im not saying that all LCB students the world wide are like this, but from where i stand i suppose it is easy to make generalisations.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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