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Chuck Roast: Poor Man's Porterhouse

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
OK not quite, but most of you are aware that the (supposedly) second most tender cut of steak comes from the Chuck. In trendy circles this is called the flatiron steak. This kinda thing isn't new. In the old days we just called it the big chuck steak. :D You can either grill the whole thing or separate out the flatiron from the stew meat. I prefer to grill the whole thing because I don't mind eating the tougher section, which if done MR, isn't more or less tender than a sirloin.

Next time you're at the supermarket, pick up a nice 2" thick chuck roast. The flatiron is one long distinct piece of muscle. It looks a little bit like a strip steak, wider on one end than the other, slightly tapering. You can remove it and either butterfly it or just grill it whole. I prefer grilling it whole, and if you have to share, just treat it like a roast.

This is by far the most economical way to great steak. So next time you're feeling the need for steak and prices are getting you down, try the old big chuck steak!
post #2 of 22
I buy chuck steaks sometimes and chuck roasts quite often. I'd say that most of our beef consumption is chuck. We eat more chicken and pork than beef the majority of the time.
post #3 of 22
silly question, but, i LOVE flatiron. but can never find the cut at the supermarket.....what would it be labeled as? there are about 4 different kinds of "chuck roasts" at my market...chuck bottom roast, chuck shoulder roast, chuck semi boneless roast etc.

what cut do i get when i order it in a restaurant?
post #4 of 22
The "Chuck-eye" is also a great lower cost steak found in the Chuck roast. Ask your butcher to cut and package a couple of 1 1/2 inch Chuck-eyes, and grill them hot and fast. I think they compete with a Rib-eye for flavor. The flat iron steak is second only to tenderloin in re.. to tenderness, but the marbling that it has makes it a better cut in my opinion.
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post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
The top part is what you want. Different parts of the country label it differently. In the midwest it's called chuck roast or sometimes pot roast. I don't think restaurants serve this cut. It's a good idea though, someone could come up with the Homer Simpson steak. :D

post #6 of 22
I was going to start a new thread about this, but this was conveniently at the top so I'll just post here =)

The first time I bought flat iron steak, it was from the supermarket and came pre-packaged and vacuum sealed(ie not from the store's meat dept). The steak was long, about 8-9 inches, and the marbling wasn't very visible. However I marinated it and grilled it at work the next day and it was excellent. Very flavorful, VERY tender. It was a big hit with my co-workers.

Ever since then I've only seen flat iron steak cut by whatever grocery store I happen to be in's meat dept. I haven't bought any yet, but visually it is very different than what I had. They're more like medallions, about 5 inches max, and have alot more matbling. This is the only way I've seen them ever since. Why are they so different than the one I first had? And will they be just as good?
post #7 of 22
RPMcMurphy: I buy a steak that is labeled "chuck shoulder tenders" which is in fact a flat iron. A flat iron looks like a brisket, having a horizontal grain. Cut into medallions, it has the vertical grain and apparent marbling we associate with a steak.
post #8 of 22
gotcha, i'll be on the lookout, although I doubt they carry it. I'm sure wholefoods does, but I only get there once every two weeks or so on my work lunch break and usually don't have time to shop around.
post #9 of 22
I am a stone mason by trade. Each winter I find a job in the culinary world. This winter I am a fry cook and learning how to butcher.

The supermarket I am working at just got in chuck tenders. I will try to get a pic of them tomorrow.
post #10 of 22
Cuts of meat are different here, but is that the same as a shoulder piece that is sort of roundish, about as big as a hand without the fingers, and with a single strip of gristle through the middle? Here it is very cheap (relatively, considering all beef is several times as expensive as in the states). It needs no special treatment, it doesn't need marinating or anything to make it tender, it's extremely tasty and is tender, except for the single line of gristle, but even that is edible, and less tough than much gristle.
Here it's called "spalla e arrosto" (shoulder and roast) or Sora (which is the name of a small town in central italy, but i doubt that is the origin, or is a dialect word for Mrs.
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 22
Flatiron is fantastic,also known as chicken steak,blade steak,under blade steak,top round and so on.

Great cut of beef and very flavorful,don't expect a very tender piece of cow that can be cut with a fork,it's packed with flavor,little chewy and takes care of the need for red meat.

I like cooking it in a hot skillet and then making a simple red wine pan sauce to go with it.
post #12 of 22
The last couple of times that I bought a chuck roast I ground it at home and made hamburger. Cook it to a nice medium rare and WOW is it flavorful (please don't be cruel to cow and overcook).

It taste soooo good it makes you wonder what they make ground beef in the stores out of. Beats me???


dan
post #13 of 22
The rib end of a chuck roll has a couple of nice steaks also. Very similar to a rib steak.
post #14 of 22
I have been on a search for good meat. I'll be on the look out for flatiron cut.
post #15 of 22
Flatiron steaks come from the shoulder of a steer, up near the front of the beast, part of the chuck primal. Top round comes from, oddly enough, the top of the round primal, located at the other end of the animal.

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post #16 of 22
I thought I edited that,I was going to say the top round is also a nice cut of beef that is pretty cheap at my market and tasty.
post #17 of 22
Chuck is great for "overcooking." I used it to make a pot roast, braised in the oven for 3 hours and it came out meltingly good. I didn't break it down into 1 inch cubes, just left it whole and there was absolutely no need to use a knife to serve. Just spooned it out onto our plates.

Ground beef in the stores might be made from quite good cuts of meat (or maybe not). Ground beef is usually made from scraps after the butchers cut perfect little steaks and filets. So they are scraps from skirt steak, flatiron steak, sirloin, chuck, even prime rib scraps. It's not all that bad you see, but if you prefer to know exactly what's in your meat you're better off buying the cut you want and grinding it yourself as you did.

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post #18 of 22
Overcooked ground beef is a taste I could do without. At work I try to accommodate every person eating, but I refuse to cook a hamburger beyond an early medium. I just leave the grill on for them:lol:

dan
post #19 of 22
Then you should always grind your own meat. Ground beef is a breeding ground for bacteria. As much as I like a rare steak I can't go any redder than medium on ground beef at restaurants, only at home if I'm careful. Too many stories that I've heard.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #20 of 22
Totally agree about not overcooking ground beef when it's for burgers. However, when doing a spaghetti sauce I always simmer very, very slowly for at least 3 hours, longer if I have time.:lips:
post #21 of 22
Before cooking lay a fewpieces of KIWI skin on it, the acids in the kiwi will make it real tender (about 20 minutes at room temp, should do it depending on thickness.;)
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post #22 of 22
When I was a kid, the beef my mom served us most of the time was chuck steak and chuck roast. We'd fight over that flatiron! Sometimes she'd put it through the food grinder for hamburger.

I've also found flatrions in cryovac in one store, as someone mentioned. They weren't pumped ('marinated' in a salty solution), so I tried one. Very tender, very good. :lips:
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