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Truffles?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ok, saffron is very expensive, but so worth it, makes everything taste and look great.:lips:

Truffles are super expensive and smell like foot and a** after a Saturday double. I personaly have them on my menu, would never eat them. :eek:

Why do people like to eat truffles so much? I don't get it? :confused:
Just my thoughts and opinion!
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #2 of 12
there are alot of really bad truffles in the world. .....until last year I thought all truffles were overpowering and not worth the effort/expense.

But, I've since had fresh French truffles that had a glorious nuiance, compare it to plonk vs. a great vintage.

So, not every truffle is the same.....possibly you've just gotten junky ones in the past.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 12
I agree.
I used to think I hated chevre until I tasted Cypress Grove's goat cheeses.
Then I realized I didn't hate chevre, I hated crappy chevre.
Some owners think that cheaper is good enough, whether it be truffles, caviar, whatever.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #4 of 12
In some cases I think its the prestige thing.
Me I wouldn't give you ten cents for them. Just the fact that they use trained pigs and dogs to find them turns me off.
I have had good ones and bad ,white and black, small and super large, still cannot aquire a taste for them . So I guess it's everyone to their own.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #5 of 12
Personally I would rather plow through a plate full of fresh picked morels, maitake, boletes or a nice fresh puffball in the afternoon after a morning in the woods.
Life is like Plastic Wrap!
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Life is like Plastic Wrap!
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post #6 of 12
Meh, I kinda like the white ones, and don't really care for the black ones, but when it's my money, I don't buy them.

However when I do have the chance to dine out I will pay for a nice rissotto made with white truffles and some white truffle shaved on top. One of the tricks I learned with truffles is to store them in a mason jar in the fridge with chunks of butter or, raw eggs-in-the-shells, as both of these ingredients will absorb odours very quickly
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 12
Truffles are great, when used correctly. Even cheap ones. One thing I learned from training with french chefs is that truffles do not have to be the prima donna scene stealer in a dish. They are (ok, were) rustic fair that can be subtlety added to food. In North America I sense that truffles are expected to be a runaway train of flavour, or just a way to boost the cost of a menu item. You mention saffron as a comparison. Over use of saffron in food drives me nuts. Makes everything taste like soap. Truffles are similar. They ought to be used judiciously, not as a war hammer.

--Al
post #8 of 12
Near complete agreement with Alan, although I think you can build a very successful dish which is "all 'bout" truffles. They're great with otherwise very simple, bland things like risotto and mashed potatoes.

Used judiciously and subtly they stimulate the palate and lend a sense of umami which makes things mysteriously delicious. I make a smoked brisket using a truffled inject which is to die for. Often people don't know what it is they like about it, because they can't immediately recognize the truffle for what it is. But like it they do.

Generally, the battle with truffles is about three things: Slicing them thin enough so they can really shine. Knowing when to add them (they overcook very easily). And having a good sense of how much to use. It's good to have an understanding, a plan and a good palate because truffles can vary so much one from another.

Thin, thin, thin.

BDL
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
On my fall seasonal menu I use truffle butter, just a small dollap on top of the Beef Tenderloin and I use a small dollap of the truffle butter for a truffle english pea sauce to finish it. When i open the container dam it reeks..Ofcourse i have tried both dishes with it being on my menu and i dont feel i over power either of the dishes. but fact is a fact when i open the truffle butter jar it smells like foot everytime.

Its just good to back in the resteraunt again as much as i wished my own personal chef company would generate enough profit, it wasnt, maybe some day..One thing i will say is being the chef of a beautiful bistro and working the line again is a huge rush, one i missed. i didnt get that adrenelian rush catering like i do banging out slips on a Saturday.

www.http://quincebistro.com
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #10 of 12
i'm very early on in my career, but i've always had this kind of internal conflict about truffles.
"i know i'm SUPPOSED to think these are great, but... i really don't!"

there were two times i liked that flavor.
once was taking a large chunk of maytag blue cheese and spreading truffle honey on top of it.
that was unlike anything i'd ever tasted before in my life.

and then the other was this mushroom alfredo sauce with truffle oil in it, where the chef i worked with used such a small amount that you could only just barely taste it.

its a very 'dissonant' flavor to me.
just like in music, that one dissonant note in a piece of music might sound really cool and interesting, but if there were too many, it would just sound unpleasant, and wrong.
same goes with truffles.
post #11 of 12
Here In melbourne Australia

black truffles are approx $6000 for one Kg

White alba truffles are $10.000 per kg



The record price paid for a single white truffle was set in December 2007, when macau casino owner stanly ho paid $330,000 (£165,000) for a specimen weighing 1.5kg (3.3lb)
post #12 of 12
The restaurant I work at uses truffle butter in a leek ragu that we put seared scallops on. Its a wonderful touch that adds a great earthiness to the sweet scallops. Im not sure how original the recipe is but I sure like how it turns out because I find properly cooked scallops to be too sweet for me most days.

We also have truffle oil that we don't use except for special occasions. I remember my chef opening a bottle, cringing then holding it up to my nose. Smelled like truffle oil to me. He tossed it out claiming it had turned. Then he got a new bottle opened it, sniffed, raised his eyebrows and headed up stairs with it. A couple of days later I told him that I was pretty sure truffle oil was supposed to smell that way, he ignored me I think out of embarrassment. What can you do?
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