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Deglazing Stirfry

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
In the bao/chao techniques of stir frying is it traditional to deglaze the bottom with wine?:chef:
post #2 of 8
Generally no.

In chao and pao the food shouldn't be in one place long enough to develop fond. Any that did develop would be dislodged and incorporated into the dish as the spatula or ladle scrapes the pan. This also assumes you have enough stove output to really cook in the chao and pao styles.

Further, these techniques tend to combine the sauce as one mixture that is then introduced into the pan. In commercial settings, the cook will dip the ladle into the various seasonings and then dump it in the wok all at once. Home cooks usually do this before hand as part of the preparation.

So a deglaze and reduction isn't really part of the cuisine but that is no hindrance to you doing so if you feel so inclined.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 8
Having had the pleasure of working with chinese chefs, I can tell you that Phatch is correct. They cook with these huge woks on special open burner hi output stoves. Anything left in them to long would burn. I have never seen them deglaze.. After finishing the dish they quickly take it out, put water in and with a pot brush clean the wok. The water connection is built into the back of the stoves and turns on when faucet of same faces the wok. Soap never used cause wok is never really dirty
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hm. Thank you. Also do you know anything about bringing out the chi of the wok?
post #5 of 8
That's pretty much a Cantonese only concept, usually called wok hei.

Grace Young wrote a book about the topic and it's very interesting. Breath of a Wok and it's quite good. It's tricky to do at home, but she'll help you learn the tricks to do it.

In great simplification it's mostly about getting your wok hot and cooking in small batches so that your wok's temp doesn't drop much on the wimpy western stove. If you want to cook in the way you see the restaurant chefs cook in a wok, you'll have to invest in something like at Outdoor Stir Fry Stove - Home - Outdoor Cooking. with heat output up to 200,000 BTUs.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 8
Barbara Tropp apparently convinced the gasfitter who serviced her stove that, yes, she knew what she was doing and, yes, she did want a serious flame. So the guy just turned a couple taps or something inside her stove and she had a huge flame. I don't know whether this would work with every stove -- surely not, really -- and she didn't specify which stove she was using for this. But it might be worth looking into. After all, the high flame doesn't actualy heat the stove elements significantly hotter, so if you actually want a flame like that there is no intrinsic safety reason not to have one. The main thing is just that your basic Western home cook does not ever, ever want a flame like that.
post #7 of 8
<div style="border: 1px solid black; margin: 0px; padding: 2px; left: -100px; top: -100px; visibility: hidden; display: none; width: auto; height: auto; position: absolute; background-color: rgb(168, 236, 255); -moz-border-radius-topleft: 5px; -moz-border-radius-topright: 5px; -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 5px; -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 5px; font-size: 12px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-align: left; z-index: 1410065406;" id="gmbabelFish"><div style="border-bottom: 1px dotted black; padding-bottom: 2px; padding-top: 2px;"><span title="Close BabelFish" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" style="cursor: pointer;"></span><span title="Language configuration" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" style="cursor: pointer;"></span><span style="cursor: pointer;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar"></span><span style="cursor: pointer;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar"></span><span style="cursor: copy;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" title="Copy result to clipboard"></span><img style="border: medium none ; margin: 0px; cursor: pointer;" title="click to translate" src="data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAABwAAAAOCAYAAAA 8E3wEAAAABmJLR0QA/wD/AP+gvaeTAAAACXBIWXMAAAsTAAALEwEAmpwYAAAAB3RJTUUH1Q UUDyoqJjAqRwAAAN1JREFUOMu1lMkVwyAMBYe0JGpCNUFNVk3k 4AUwxPGS+ILxkzX8jyTH/Sfu9nrmJ3cXlnMASyWRPwd2d5XlHCBZn1BthcbRAdxTZQDI8k3 mQzg11rhF+QZ9jdNOcQib6GFQYJYgC***SRf6GsLU6wEY5yubT FqF2yq1vRwr3INXdQUWG+je1pELX4ED1wDyRAR0WfuAA9gloIT yvsFMIMgYInYRqF6rO9Sqz9qkO5ilyo0o3YBwJ+6vrdQonxWUQ llhXeHcb/wabMPkP2n81ocAIoLZrMqn/4y2RwP8DcQ+d6rT9ATiAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC" align="middle"></div><span></span></div><div style="border: 1px solid black; margin: 0px; padding: 2px; left: -100px; top: -100px; visibility: hidden; display: none; width: auto; height: auto; position: absolute; background-color: rgb(168, 236, 255); -moz-border-radius-topleft: 5px; -moz-border-radius-topright: 5px; -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 5px; -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 5px; font-size: 12px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-align: left; z-index: 1410065406;" id="gmbabelFish"><div style="border-bottom: 1px dotted black; padding-bottom: 2px; padding-top: 2px;"><span title="Close BabelFish" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" style="cursor: pointer;"></span><span title="Language configuration" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" style="cursor: pointer;"></span><span style="cursor: pointer;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar"></span><span style="cursor: pointer;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar"></span><span style="cursor: copy;" class="gmBabelMousishToolBar" title="Copy result to clipboard"></span><img style="border: medium none ; margin: 0px; cursor: pointer;" title="click to translate" src="data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAABwAAAAOCAYAAAA 8E3wEAAAABmJLR0QA/wD/AP+gvaeTAAAACXBIWXMAAAsTAAALEwEAmpwYAAAAB3RJTUUH1Q UUDyoqJjAqRwAAAN1JREFUOMu1lMkVwyAMBYe0JGpCNUFNVk3k 4AUwxPGS+ILxkzX8jyTH/Sfu9nrmJ3cXlnMASyWRPwd2d5XlHCBZn1BthcbRAdxTZQDI8k3 mQzg11rhF+QZ9jdNOcQib6GFQYJYgC***SRf6GsLU6wEY5yubT FqF2yq1vRwr3INXdQUWG+je1pELX4ED1wDyRAR0WfuAA9gloIT yvsFMIMgYInYRqF6rO9Sqz9qkO5ilyo0o3YBwJ+6vrdQonxWUQ llhXeHcb/wabMPkP2n81ocAIoLZrMqn/4y2RwP8DcQ+d6rT9ATiAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC" align="middle"></div><span></span></div>Barbara Tropp apparently convinced the gasfitter who serviced her stove that, yes, she knew what she was doing and, yes, she did want a serious flame. So the guy just turned a couple taps or something inside her stove and she had a huge flame. I don't know whether this would work with every stove -- surely not, really -- and she didn't specify which stove she was using for this. But it might be worth looking into. After all, the high flame doesn't actualy heat the stove elements significantly hotter, so if you actually want a flame like that there is no intrinsic safety reason not to have one. The main thing is just that your basic Western home cook does not ever, ever want a flame like that. There are also devious methods for creating a huge flame for wok cooking, but all of the ones I've seen used and heard about strike me as amazingly dangerous unless you are yourself a licensed gasfitter.<br>
post #8 of 8
[IMG]http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAABwAAAAOCAYAAAA 8E3wEAAAABmJLR0QA/wD/AP+gvaeTAAAACXBIWXMAAAsTAAALEwEAmpwYAAAAB3RJTUUH1Q UUDyoqJjAqRwAAAN1JREFUOMu1lMkVwyAMBYe0JGpCNUFNVk3k 4AUwxPGS+ILxkzX8jyTH/Sfu9nrmJ3cXlnMASyWRPwd2d5XlHCBZn1BthcbRAdxTZQDI8k3 mQzg11rhF+QZ9jdNOcQib6GFQYJYgC***SRf6GsLU6wEY5yubT FqF2yq1vRwr3INXdQUWG+je1pELX4ED1wDyRAR0WfuAA9gloIT yvsFMIMgYInYRqF6rO9Sqz9qkO5ilyo0o3YBwJ+6vrdQonxWUQ llhXeHcb/wabMPkP2n81ocAIoLZrMqn/4y2RwP8DcQ+d6rT9ATiAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC[/IMG]
Barbara Tropp apparently convinced the gasfitter who serviced her stove that, yes, she knew what she was doing and, yes, she did want a serious flame. So the guy just turned a couple taps or something inside her stove and she had a huge flame. I don't know whether this would work with every stove -- surely not, really -- and she didn't specify which stove she was using for this. But it might be worth looking into. After all, the high flame doesn't actualy heat the stove elements significantly hotter, so if you actually want a flame like that there is no intrinsic safety reason not to have one. The main thing is just that your basic Western home cook does not ever, ever want a flame like that. There are also devious methods for creating a huge flame for wok cooking, but all of the ones I've seen used and heard about strike me as amazingly dangerous unless you are yourself a licensed gasfitter.
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