New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

sweetness scale?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
David brought home a new blackberry jam. Before committing myself and my Sunday breakfast, I tried a tiny taste. YIKES! :eek: WAY too sweet! I didn't even want to pull my tongue back into my head until I'd washed the taste away first.
This early morning shocker started me thinking: is there a relative sweetness scale like the Scoville scale for relative hotness?
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
post #2 of 9
Not that I know of, but you can look at the nutrition label and figure out how much sugar there is to a given amount, say a tablespoon. Then compare. That won't be precise though as other agents will affect the balance such as vinegar, citrus juice, or maybe they used something to negate tartness as baking soda would, but I doubt they'd use baking soda.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 9
This is the only thing that I am aware of that relates to sugar content which would relate to sweetness

Brix - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
jbd, I forgot about Brix, thanks. So that suggests that sugar is an absolute, since Brix measures water to sugar ratio. But what kind of "sugar" are they talking about? Sucrose? What about other forms? Would a T of pure fructose combined with a cup of water achieve the same Brix level as a T of sucrose?
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
post #5 of 9
I'm not sure of labeling, but i notice many jams with "no sugar added" on the label, but are as sweet as those with the standard 60% sugar ratio. I think the reason is that they jsut boil down the fruit so it ends up being much less water, so the proportion of natural sugar in it is the same. So i don;t think the ingredients list will tell you how sweet it is. Was it noticeably sweeter than other jams you had?
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #6 of 9
According to this article the Brix scale applies to fructose as well as sucrose.
High-fructose corn syrup - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I also found a reference that indicated that fructose was 1.73 times sweeter than sucrose.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks jbd, I thought the Brix scale was for sucrose which combines fructose and glucose. I'm still wondering how base-level sweetness is measured, or maybe against what is it measured. The Scoville scale measures the amount of capsaicin present. So which of the "oses" provides the absolute?

Phil and siduri--The jelly (actually black berry preserves) was 13 g per T of sugar while the other jams we have are labeled 12 g per T.
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
Reply
post #8 of 9
There are many such scales on ebay any other personal website, Search the main words in google, you will find many. :peace:
post #9 of 9
I did find this as a semi sweetness scale reference:

Sweetners

But nothing like a Scoville scale for hotness/heatness seems to exist.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking