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Job interviews

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I went to a job interview this morning and talked with the chef about his open position. He explained the position, what was expected of the person who filled the position, the hours and the benefits. He then asked me some questions about past employers and the usual "whats your best qualities/ negative qualities/ best dish/ etc. etc.". He asked, why I was interested in the position, I responded. At the end of the interview he asked me if I had any questions. I didnt and do not so far. My question to you guys is "what did I miss?". He looked at me kind of funny and if I did later feel free to call him. I thanked him and said if i did i would definitely call. He was just about to say something when another employee needed his help and the interview ended. He did call back this afternoon for a second interview. Any thoughts?
post #2 of 8
I tell my students to ask questions (at least 1) at an interview to show the potential employer that they are genuinely interested. I wouldn't sweat it, though.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #3 of 8
Jim has a good point, something simple. Like! How soon are you looking to fill this position? or a good one is May I come in at your convenience and work a few hours helping you out for free and show you what i can do and see if we are a good match?

Honestly the most important things you did were. You showed up, you called him(that is so important), and you got a second interview.

All in all sounds like you had a great interview, focuss on that, not asking a question is no big deal, he will never remember that. What ever you do don't remind him, lol :lol:

Best of luck to you.
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #4 of 8
When I was in a position to hire people, I liked for them to have some questions. When I go on job interviews, I like to look prepared, so I spend a little time thinking of questions. Some things I sometimes ask:

What do you think is the hardest part of this job?

What sort of opportunities are there for advancement?

How would you describe the working environment?

What is the next step in the hiring process?

Also, I try to make sure I have the interviewer's name and correct spelling (I ask for a business card, if I need to) so that I can write a follow-up letter immediately. And I mean immediately, like as soon as I get home from the interview. I like to have it postmarked the same day. The follow-up letter is a great way to emphasize what a good hire you would be, and to slip in any information you forgot during the interview.

It really makes a difference when you are prepared for an interview. I find that putting in just an hour or so beforehand makes me feel much more relaxed and confident during the interview.
post #5 of 8
Did you say anything that was even remotely negative about your current or former employers? If you did that always left me with a bad feeling about the person I was interviewing.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys, lots of info there, he did explain about how big the company was so there was definite room for advancement and what he thought was the hard part of the job, the hours. I did manage to blurt out something about uniforms but all in all I just thought he did a good job of explaining everything I needed to know. I definitely will not bring it up today, thanks, and thanks again for your guys thoughts. Oh and chefhow I did not say anything negative about my past, a good chef I know, like you, told me no matter how bad it was try to stay positive.
post #7 of 8
It is always good to go with questions, old school professionals are taught that this one way of showing you are truly interested. But that often puts me in quandry because the only questions I could think of I don't really care about - that's how much I want the job!

So if the major ones have been answered, like time, shift, expectations, etc.... and they ask me if I have any questions I usually say something like. "I had a few concerning the job and company, but you did a pretty good job of explaining everthing that was important to me. I am very interested in learning more about the menu company and staff, but no concerns that would make me hesitate to take the job if it was offered. May I follow up later?"

Also if it hasn't been asked yet I will say "Is a try-out part of the interview process. I would be happy to come in at your conveince if you think it would be helpful for evaluating my skill."
This seems to work most of the time.

These always seem to leave good impressions. (I get offered most jobs I interview for)
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #8 of 8
Did you demonstrate any passion for cooking? Most chefs like to see a certain amount of passion. I will echo Jim by suggesting that a few questions would have demonstrated interest. It would have also given the chef an opportunity to start a discussion and to get a feel for you as an individual.

As you probably know, an effective kitchen staff has to function as a team. Adding a new employee to an existing staff always creates questions about how this person will fit in. Will this person be able to do the job? Will this employee be able to get along with others? How will adding this person affect overall production?
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