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Label Readers

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
i read the nutrition facts on everything..pop, cereal...frozen dinners. what about u? what do you think about this at Safeway.com its called the Food Flex application and it monitors the nutritional values of the groceries u buy. think this is a good way to watch what you eat?
post #2 of 13
I read the ingredients lists a lot:D

I don't trust Safeway to care about my health as much as they care about their bottom line ($), but it can't hurt to get more info.
post #3 of 13
It seems to know only what you've bought on your membership card. I dont' use such cards and buy from many different places, rarely places that have loyalty card systems. And I spend less than the prices at those stores that run loyalty card systems.

So to me it's useless.

And it's more prying with customer research which is what those loyalty cards are really used for. There is also compelling research that those loyalty cards actually raise the prices overall at the stores that use them. They have to pay for all that backend overhead to run the program afterall.
post #4 of 13
When I get a loyalty card or whatever, I give a false name and address. I don't want to be bothered, but I like the savings even if it's not much. They don't know the difference.
post #5 of 13
I'm to the point that I rarely buy anything that's packaged, so for the most part, there are no labels to read. However, when I do buy a packaged product (seems to be limited to canned beans, some soups, hot dogs a few times a year, maybe a couple-three other items) you bet I read the labels. Mostly I buy known products, but I still read the labels just in case there have been any changes. Apart from ingredients and nutrition, country of origin is also important.

There's no need for Safeway to "help" me watch what I eat.

I do have a Safeway card because I sometimes shop for a client at the Safeway store near her house a few times a year. Safeway prices are high, overall their quality is poor, and I wouldn't trust them to shine my shoes.
post #6 of 13
As someone who develops food and writes label for a living I will say that you have to "read between the lines" when reading an all natural or organic label. Know what you are reading before assuming that something is really all natural or organic. Every company/farmer/manufacturer has different definitions for the claims and they are still not regulated by the govt nor are their techinical definitions. As for nutritional statements and ingredient statements they are what they are and just because I use potasium sorbate as a preservative(vitamin K) and someone else uses sorbic acid (a chemical compound without a scary name) doesnt mean its not natural, ppl think that just because its on the whole foods list it must not be good for you. If you ever read what whole foods doesnt allow you would be surprised.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #7 of 13
Are you saying that potassium sorbate is Vitamin K?
post #8 of 13
Chefhow!
Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe potasium sorbate is derived from sorbic acid. I remember way back when we sprayed it on some Salamis and other drier food components as a preservative before they went in package.. The other thing we used was sulphur dioxide which was nasty and made me sneeze. I dont remember it associated with Vit. K ?Or at least then it wasnt.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 13
That's the way I understand it ....
post #10 of 13
The part in bold is not accurate to the three store chains in my area of Massachusetts, namely Stop 'n' Shop, Shaw's, and Hannaford's, the last of which doesn't use such cards, and has been advertising with the slogan, "no card games!"

The point about the cards is that it allows them to mark things as discounted when they aren't. You jack up the price a bit, then add a "special card discount" to lower it again. If the customer believes that he or she is getting a deal, he or she is more inclined to buy. And because that "deal" is dependent on loyalty, the customer is less likely to notice the trick because he or she isn't comparing to other stores.

A local market survey group did a 3-month survey and found that prices at Hannaford's were on average lower for essentially everything than at the other two stores, even with the "special card discounts"; without these, the difference was ludicrous. Interestingly, some of the things that were most consistently cheaper at Hannaford's were the things most consistently card-discounted at the other stores. Translation: if it gets card-discounted often, it's overpriced even at the discount.

So when I left the US in June, at least in Massachusetts, the loyalty cards were completely dishonest. People should be able to figure it out themselves, really: have you ever gone to the checkout and forgotten to bring your card? They have one at the register and beep it for you as "customer service." In other words, unless the cashier is obnoxious (or you are), you always get the "loyalty" discount. Shouldn't that be suspicious, something for nothing, a big corporation just giving things away?
post #11 of 13
Four years or so ago, the Wall Street Journal reported a survey of loyalty-card supermarkets versus non-card markets, one of each in cities across the country. They shopped a standard, complete shopping list in each store.

In every case, the card markets were more expensive, even after getting the "discounts". So, if you're persuaded to do most of your shopping at a market because of the "deals" you're getting... you're getting screwed.

The Jewel/Osco here - a strong loyalty-card operation - is presently running a promotion on 1.5L Svedka Swedish vodka; supposedly marked down from $42.99 to $34.99. Such a deal!

I buy it at Costco for $17.99 all the time. It's a pretty nice vodka.

So much for the bargains.

We only go to Jewel because my wife likes their Osco pharmacist; try not to buy anything else there. :mad:

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #12 of 13
Chef ED and Shel, they are used interchangably in indredient statements depending upon whether its a natural product or not. This was my point, if you dont know what to look for, how to read them and what the ingredients are its difficult to understand.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #13 of 13
Funny how it seems different in different parts of the country. I do a good bit of my shopping at a Kroger-owned store which uses the card system. I compare prices at all the stores in my area and can rattle off prices for items I buy frequently at each store to within a few pennies (unless they've suddenly gone up as has happened recently with quite a few items at Walmart, in particular). There are times when the card prices are higher but, in general, I actually get a value on the items I buy using the card.

I've found that simply knowing the regular prices at the local stores, helps me to know when a deal is actually a deal. If you look at different dollar stretcher tips, keeping a price book is always highly recommended. That's the only way to truly know if you're getting a deal when looking at the sales each week.

BTW, if you have a Kroger (or any of their stores) card and forget it, you can simply enter your phone number into the credit card machine and it will work the same as scanning your card. Of course, you have to use the same phone number you used when registering.

Edited to add:

Back to the subject at hand, yes, I do read labels. I'm interested in not only knowing what we are eating but I also read labels to figure out how to make things myself...particularly spice mixes, condiments, etc.

I don't know if I'd utilize a system like what you described at Safeway but I do like getting Kroger coupons on the items I frequently purchase using my card.
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