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favorite dry rubs

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
i have been hosting more and more bbq type meals lately
and i have become a BIG FAN of "bad byron's butt rub"

i have been trying a lot of different dry rubs but it seems that
most are variations of the same ingredients: salt, black pepper,
granulated garlic, granulated onion or onion powder, paprika,
then maybe brown sugar, chipotle powder, cayenne powder,
or small amounts of other ingredients.

i am a fan of bad byron's butt rub because it has less salt so more
of the other ingredients can be tasted when you add more of it.

LET ME MAKE IT CLEAR ... I DO NOT SELL THIS PRODUCT !
i have to buy it like everyone else! but what i want to know is,
does anyone else have a rub you really like?

oh! and another great rub ... the "steak seasoning" from
"the goode company" in houston texas.
post #2 of 11

Perfect Rib Rub

crimsonmist,

If forced to choose a commercial rub it would be "Strawberry's Dry Rub" , the favorite of my Arkansas in-laws. I'm uncertain how widely available it is, also it fits the profile you mention of "salty". (Here are the ingredients by weight: Salt, Paprika, and other spices, Monosodium Glutamate, Dehydrated Garlic, Dehydrated Onion, Sugar, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein and Corn Gluten, Tricalcium Phosphate (to prevent caking), Extractive of Paprika (color), and Turmeric.)

Not too appealing now that I look at it in print.

My question to you is why do you have to buy rib rub? Mixing your own presents an opportunity to be creative, and more important, to adjust the results to your own taste.

After years of experimenting I now mix what I modestly call "Perfect Rib Rub" :smiles: which I am happy to share with you as a starting point for your own blend:

6 TBLS Brown Sugar
2 TBLS Chili Powder
1 TBLS Pimenton’ de la Vera (Smoked Spanish Paprika)
1 TBLS Garlic Powder

2 TSP Onion Powder
2 TSP Coarse Sea Salt/Kosher Salt
2 TSP Cumin
1 TSP Cinnamon
1 TSP Black Pepper
½ TSP Cayenne


Mix thoroughly (I use a spare coffee grinder I keep just for spices).

Make certain that silverback has been removed from ribs, ribs are washed free of blood, and they have been patted dry with paper towels.

Rub generously and firmly into prepared ribs.

------

The secret ingredient of course is the Pimenton'. It smells so good that when you first open the tin you might want to smear it all over yourself.

If you have trouble finding it locally here is the contact info from the label:
The Spanish Table
Seattle. WA 98101
(206) 682-2827
Berkely, CA 94702
(510) 548-1383


Cheers!

Dennis
post #3 of 11
This one is a favorite of mine:

Peppered Roast Rub

¼ cup ground black pepper
2 TBSP ground white pepper
2 TBSP salt
1 ½ tsp. thyme
1 ½ tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. onion powder

Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight spice jar. Rub evenly over pot roasts and stakes.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
My question to you is why do you have to buy rib rub? Mixing your own presents an opportunity to be creative, and more important, to adjust the results to your own taste.

===== i understand that fact that creativity is a plus, but
understand also that some of the commercial rubs are products
of extensive "field testing". i was researching dry rubs on the web
and "buttrub" caught my eye. seems that "bad byron" has won
quite a few bbq cookoffs with his rub, so i decided to try some
and it is just plain delicious! as mentioned, it is not as salty
as some other rubs i have used.

the one big advantage to the "buttrub" is that the particle grains are
very uniform and the rub itself is very well blended. it must be the
anti-caking agent they use i suppose.

whenever i make a rub (and i have tried quite a few!) my problem
is that the brown sugar is "wet" and tends to make the dry rubs
clump, thereby making the final product kinda clumpy. when i make
something with the buttrub the coverage is nice and uniform and
the finished product has this nice mahogany finish to it.


After years of experimenting I now mix what I modestly call "Perfect Rib Rub" :smiles: which I am happy to share with you as a starting point for your own blend:

6 TBLS Brown Sugar
2 TBLS Chili Powder
1 TBLS Pimenton’ de la Vera (Smoked Spanish Paprika)
1 TBLS Garlic Powder

2 TSP Onion Powder
2 TSP Coarse Sea Salt/Kosher Salt
2 TSP Cumin
1 TSP Cinnamon
1 TSP Black Pepper
½ TSP Cayenne


Mix thoroughly (I use a spare coffee grinder I keep just for spices).

===== do you feel the coffee grinder makes the grains more uniform?

Make certain that silverback has been removed from ribs, ribs are washed free of blood, and they have been patted dry with paper towels.

===== this is a matter of opinion for several of the bbq-ers i talk
to. some take off the silver, some leave it on. i tend to make
shallow slices between the ribs and keep it on. when cooked up
the silverback is crispy and pretty tasty.

Rub generously and firmly into prepared ribs.

------

The secret ingredient of course is the Pimenton'. It smells so good that when you first open the tin you might want to smear it all over yourself.

===== thank you for your generosity in sharing your rub recipe!
all are fun to make and more fun to eat.
post #5 of 11
I use a commercial rub for catering. It makes for a uniform product and a rub that doesn't clump the way a homemade one tends to do. There are hundreds of commercial rubs on the market so it is hard to say which is the best.
post #6 of 11
The Spanish smoked paprika is readily available at any Penzey's.
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #7 of 11
The coffee grinder does ensure uniformity of the blend. I put the blended rub in a plastic dry herb "shaker" bottle with a screw-on top - never had a problem with clumping.

It is all about pleasing yourself. My point is that one shouldn't let commercial preparations determine the outcome of your cooking - unless that's the taste you prefer :-)


Cheers!
post #8 of 11
There are about 2.37 bazillion rubs available on the market, ranging from small selections by individual barbecue enthusiasts to products produced by mass market corporations.

I still like to mix my own, as I prefer rubs with less salt and sugar than most of the ones available. I like to add some ground allspice to mine, sometimes a dash of cinnamon and ground ginger to evoke a bit of Jamaican jerk style. Or sometimes throw in some chipotle chili powder, for cases like the other night when I did some loin backs on the grill - the chipotle adds a extra hint of smoke that you don't get when grilling ribs for only an hour or two instead of a long smoke. And while I will sometimes use rosemary when oven roasting pork, I've never tried it in a rub. Would a saurkraut flavor rub work on ribs?

For beef I tend to use just salt, pepper and garlic, rarely a rub. One of these days I may like to try some of Billy Bones' cherry rub, since I do like cherry flavor with beef. For poultry it depends on my mood at the time, sometimes rubs, sometimes a simple splash of just 2 - 3 spices.

So I guess the summary is that my favorite rub is the one I am using at the time.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #9 of 11

Fennel and Orange

I'm a big fan of ground fennel seed and orange zest in my pork rubs. Fennel and Cumin together is the bomb.
post #10 of 11
I use rosemary in my beef rub. I have yet to find a commercial beef rub I like because most are sweet ad I dislike sweet with beef. For pork I have been using Smokin Guns Mild when I cater and sometimes at home for myself.
post #11 of 11
The grinder evens out spice sizes so it goes on more evenly. This can also address your sugar issue. If you use turbinado sugar, you don't have the wet issue. Turbinado sugar is a less refined sugar that still has some of the natural molasses in the crystal. However, it' is totally dry. But it is a larger crystal. Grinding the rub breaks up this sugar and makes the rub go on very smooth and even.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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