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High School Home Ec Class

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Next week I'm speaking to a rural/urban/would be suburban but it's 20 minutes outside of STL on the ruralish side....High School (1st year teacher) contacted me and asked me to talk to her Home Ec (now called something else) class. Thought I'd spend the 50 minutes minus 10-15 for Q&A speaking about various options in the food industry. Anyone wanna help round out the list? tia.


food writer
food writer/editor
publicist
chef, restaurant, country club, private club, diner, fine dining
food stylist
food photographer
caterer
food stage director
television stage manager
prep person
baker
pastry maker
teacher
RD
market manager
sales rep
farmer, small/large, sustainable, commodity, food....produce/meat/both, fuel, other products...ie cotton, hemp, wood/bamboo
chains vs independent scratch restaurants
event planners, offsite caterers, wedding planner

ok, off to teach an orthodox jewish man how to cook local produce, please continue with the list....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #2 of 8
You may want to break R&D out into a couple of segments,
Food Science(Dairy and Meat science are very high paying),
Food Technology,
Food Engineer,
Chemical Engineer.
Bioengineering(nutricutecals, pre and Probiotics)
Plant engineering,there is a whole world of engineers who have food backgrounds that design the equipment and lines to run the food in plants.
Quality Assurance and Quality Control, Biology
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #3 of 8
As a High School culinary arts teacher, I would STRONGLY suggest NOT discussing/lecturing/talking for that length of time. While I am sure you have great intentions, their attention span really is about 9-11 minutes. After that, good night.
How about 'chunking' your presentation into group activity, individual/hands-on time time and small group time? Is there some brief activity you can try with them?
  • Perhaps some menu writing?
  • Best/Worst dining experience?
  • Role-play customer service scenarios?
  • PowerPoint (keep it brief!) of local foods, unusual food photos?
  • "Guess the Cost" of... fabricating a whole steer... restaurant ownership... etc
  • ... whatever happens to be your speciality?

Good luck with your presentation! Keep us posted!

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #4 of 8
As a high school chef instructor, I agree with Jim.

A presentation about careers in the food service industry is typically found in home economics or culinary arts textbooks.

Last year I gave a presentation at a small rural school.

I took a selection of food with me ... cumin grilled chicken burritos sliced at the bias, honey glazed fruit kebabs, glazed strawberry tarts, chocolate chip cookies etc.

Although I briefly touched upon careers in the food service industry, I primarily talked about traditional career paths in a restaurant. I also talked about a typical work day and what it's like to work "in the back of the house." While I talked, I sliced and plated chocolate cake, drizzling each slice with chocolate syrup, and garnishing it with whipped cream, and a strawberry fan.

Before the presentation was over, I had set up a buffet. Students were invited to have one chocolate chip cookie and one other food item of their choice. You should have seen the food disappear! I had a lot of fun.

Best of all, the students got to see me in action. I wore my whites, demonstrated the appropriate use of sanitation techniques, gave them something to look at while I was talking, and personalized the discussion.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
feed them, yep that gets attention every time.......pictures too, note to self: hire the kindergarten kid to show you how to make a power point presentation.

The last couple of years I've talked to university students.

1) food writing class on local food, brought pig pictures some of the head shots were X'd by the instructor as potentially too gross for some of the kids.

2) food literature class on local food ethics

3) RD & nutrition class....we broke down a local pig half.....

it's been a while since I've talked to HS kids about catering careers for an hour, usually it's more themetic or multiple weeks of 3 hours a day culinary camp.....either farm camp, ice cream camp or culinary intensive...most rewarding but also most exhausting.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
follow up, 9 students.....out of the 9 one guy wanted to get into culinary profession.
the teacher was a newby and didn't prep the class in advance....
I took them through the variances of personal cheffing, offsite and onsite catering, how to start a business, fiscal benefit of breaking down a pig, fiscal variences of catering vs personal cheffing, local and national schools, how to write a local seasonal menu......

It would have been better if they'd done some research prior to my talk and had questions......
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #7 of 8
I think if you are presenting culinary products, services or even talking a class thorugh recipes and how the processes work its useful to have a presentation behind you with imagery that supports your content - I started doing this a few years back with a secondary school class for HE and it seemed to keep thier attention. Reading sites like visual communications, vis.com and vconline helped me quite a bit to understand why using images helps in education, even though their content is not necesserily about food or cooking . . .
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
I took in photos, used a chalkboard.....essentially old school.....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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