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How to make a 'crust' for roast beef?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Good afternoon, all...:lips:

My aunt used to make a delightful roast of beef which had a crust (for a sealant, I suppose) all over it. It was always so tender!

I wish I had asked her for the recipe/technique when I had the chance. I do know that it was a paste-like mixture that incorporated flour, softened butter (or margarine) and dry mustard. But I have no idea of what the ratio of said ingredients should be.

Also, I believe she started the roast in a very hot oven in order to 'set' the crust... and then turned the temperature down for the remainder of the cooking time. Here again, I don't have any specifics.

Is anyone familiar with this type of roast beef preparation? I'd sure love to recreate the wonderful roasts she made.

Thank you for any advice or tips,

Helen
post #2 of 11
Starting off in a really hot oven and then lowering the temperature is a typical way of achieving a crust on a roast.

For myself I make a paste using olive oil, salt, minced garlic, and crushed peppercorns. I rub it all over and then I sear it on the stove top. Once it's seared all over I then stick it in the oven to finish cooking.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Your technique sounds wonderful, Mapiva! Four of my favorite things... olive oil, salt, garlic and peppercorns... :talk:

Do you have a minutes per pound hint for the finish in the oven?

Thanks so much for your reply,

Helen
post #4 of 11
Your grandma's technique sounds a little bit like Beef Wellington. (minus the mushrooms and foi gras). Which is wrapped in puff pastry or pie crust. You could also check out salt crusts (you don't actually eat the salt).
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #5 of 11
Lately I've been thinking a bit about the start high and finish low approach. When you put the cold ( actually room temp, hopefully folks temper their roasts before cooking ) meat into the high temp oven you do get a certain type of crust. But if you start that roast in a cooler oven, maybe 275 - 300 F or so, and let it come up to about 125 internal, the surface will be covered with juices. What about then cranking up the oven to 450 or so and crusting up that juicy surface at the end of cooking? It might be good, it might be tough and chewy.

I might have to sacrifice a rump roast or two this week to work on this.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6 of 11
Generally I would say about 15 minutes per pound to get a medium rare center, but it would depend on the size of the roast. The internal temperature should be around 120.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 11

When I say Hot, I mean Hot!

For roasts of all kinds I start as hot as my oven will go, 500'F in a convection oven is perfect. Heavily season the outside and roast for fifteen or twenty minutes. Then turn the oven down to 300'F or so and take it to 120'F internal. Crusty outside and medium-rare all the way through.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
I found a recipe while at my mom's house today for beef wellington. It called for puff pastry wrapped around a beef tenderloin. Looked so good I had to copy it to try in the near future...

And I *did* check out salt crusts... another interesting variation that I'll definitely get around to trying out.

Thank you very much for the leads!

Helen :)
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Sounds awesome!

Thank you for your reply... :roll:

Helen
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Duly noted... thanks again, Mapiva!

Helen
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
My brother does this with Peameal bacon (back bacon to some) roasts. He says that baking it with conventional methods makes a nice roast... but he wanted the cornmeal crust to be, well, crusty... so after the roast is done he cranks the oven temperature up to about 450 degrees and watches it until it's crackling and browned. He'll talk your ear off about how perfect this technique is if you let him... ;)

Thank you ever so much for your response... and I hope all of your test roasts are scrumptious!!

Helen
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